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My reviews of various different capos and what I finally settled on


twalker

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Say, you said...

 

Shubb 12 string Capo - $22.00 : The shifting of strings problem as well as the weird fit for thick necks on the vintage guitars was solved! Who would have thought?

 

===

 

I can't tell what you mean. You like it or not? And if you do, for six string or 12 string?

 

I need a good capo for an 8 string baritone Taylor. Such that the capo will fret the octave strings correctly.

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Toby, you are right about beefy necks and some brands. My old shubb works ok on my Gibson, not so much on my NRP steel. The Keyser doesnt pop off on the National but is really too tight if I'm fretting. Are they making these things with low profile gits in mind? Still looking. May have to go retro and get one of those 60s jobs.

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Say, you said...

 

Shubb 12 string Capo - $22.00 : The shifting of strings problem as well as the weird fit for thick necks on the vintage guitars was solved! Who would have thought?

 

===

 

I can't tell what you mean. You like it or not? And if you do, for six string or 12 string?

 

I need a good capo for an 8 string baritone Taylor. Such that the capo will fret the octave strings correctly.

 

Well, I said the problem was solved so yes, I like it. As I primarily play 6 string I'll use if for that purpose.

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Toby, you are right about beefy necks and some brands. My old shubb works ok on my Gibson, not so much on my NRP steel. The Keyser doesnt pop off on the National but is really too tight if I'm fretting. Are they making these things with low profile gits in mind? Still looking. May have to go retro and get one of those 60s jobs.

 

 

The Ultimate and 12 string Shubb all work on my National. I can play up to the 7th fret with the Ultimate and the Shubb because of it's design has no problems there.

 

The Paige can only go up to the 5th fret.

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Personally I got no use for capos. Then again I still use a tuning fork.

 

But capos fashioned of a rubber band or shoe lace and a pencil as well as punching holes in a speaker with pencils to get a fuzz sound were in a lot of player's bag of tricks back in the early to mid-1960s.

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Thanks Toby,informative post.

As a kid I started with the Dunlop, moved to the old Hamilton Capo for years and then discovered Shubb,

which is the only capo I've used since the early 1980's.

Might check out the Paige based on your article.

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I am a Keyser fan. Have 9 or 10 of that bradnd - different variations o drop D, Drop A...

I have one Dunlop Victor - amazinggly good working.

Got one G7th Nashville capo - use it when the guitar is with some 11-52 strings.

But I prefere the Keysers.

Of course I started with some pencil too msp_biggrin.gif

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Personally I got no use for capos. Then again I still use a tuning fork.

 

But capos fashioned of a rubber band or shoe lace and a pencil as well as punching holes in a speaker with pencils to get a fuzz sound were in a lot of player's bag of tricks back in the early to mid-1960s.

 

I did the razor blade thing on some speakers in an old amp. I think I read that Sumlin did that too.

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I did the razor blade thing on some speakers in an old amp. I think I read that Sumlin did that too.

 

The speaker on my first practice amp just blew from being cranked up too high at small gigs. Had much the same effect, and involved less risk than playing with razors!

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Personally I got no use for capos.
Fair play--neither did Gary Davis. It works, as long as you don't mind working out of closed chords positions. If you want some open string to work with and the singer you are plying backing calls a number in F# or Bb, well.......
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Personally I got no use for capos. Then again I still use a tuning fork.

 

But capos fashioned of a rubber band or shoe lace and a pencil as well as punching holes in a speaker with pencils to get a fuzz sound were in a lot of player's bag of tricks back in the early to mid-1960s.

 

How can you possibly have no use for capos ?

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I need a good capo for an 8 string baritone Taylor. Such that the capo will fret the octave strings correctly.

 

Try the Paige 12 string capo. Oddly, it's hard to find product information at the Paige site, but it's shown here http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/paige-12-string-guitar-capo . It is the only capo that I've found that really works on the octave strings of my 12. I have a Shubb 12, but like others I use it on my larger necked 6's. The Paige 12 requires a little time and patience. You have to get it lined up on the octave strings just right. But it actually works, which is the key thing. I don't see why it wouldn't work on any guitar with octave strings.

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Somebody needs to invent a capo with a nut with grooves on it, so we can bend strings to our heart's content.......

 

It would obviously have to be under the strings like a nut, have the correct size holes, but will obviously need some kind of spring-loaded gadget with individual nuts per string so we can move up the ever-increasing neck sizes.....

 

 

I have nearly all of the above capos and really prefer to play without the thing - I guess I will have to try an Ultimate.

 

(I have the 12 string Paige mentioned above, but WARNING to 60s Gibson B25-12 owners - it only fits as far as the 3rd fret on a 2 inch Gibson neck! (without removing paint). It works great for that limited amount though!

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

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Toby, I've heard stories about designs like the Paige and Ultimate damaging the neck of a guitar if they're too tight. I was told they can put a crease in the wood. Have you heard anything about this? I've got a Paige, but I'm hesitant to use it.

 

 

I haven't heard about that but I can't see how it's possible as both of those capos have soft material, rubber or fiber between the metal and the neck.

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Hi Toby,

 

I wish I had time to get involved in this discussion, but I am too lazy right now. My wife is a capo-aholic, so we have most of them. We keep one with each individual guitar, so it would take me all day to open all the cases (100+), take a picture, and then put them all back. Maybe I'll do it after I retire from my retirement. Our current favorite overall is the Paige Clik.

 

 

Here is a picture of the stuff in our capo drawer.

 

capos.jpg

 

clustercapo.jpg

 

Best,

 

-Tom

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Hi Toby,

 

I wish I had time to get involved in this discussion, but I am too lazy right now. My wife is a capo-aholic, so we have most of them. We keep one with each individual guitar, so it would take me all day to open all the cases (100+), take a picture, and then put them all back. Maybe I'll do it after I retire from my retirement. Our current favorite overall is the Paige Clik.

 

 

Here is a picture of the stuff in our capo drawer.

 

capos.jpg

 

clustercapo.jpg

 

Best,

 

-Tom

 

I hate to admit this but I'm thinking of trying one of those out myself. I already have a Paige but not the 'click.'

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I have Shubbs also but I remember having a hard time learning to play a B7 chord around them. I'm wondering if a Paige or Ultimate's shape might make that position a little easier. If you're a beginner and you're reading this it would be the deciding factor as far as I'm concerned. Perhaps Toby can come back on this issue as regards his comparison? And Tom, jeez man, you have a freakin' capo museum!

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