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Relic'd Vs Comfortably "Worn In"


charlie brown

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As most of you (that have been around here, for any length of time), know...I'm NOT a big

fan of "Factory Relicing"! [unsure][tongue] But, that's just MY opinion, and personal preference,

and not meant to dictate anything beyond that. I would LOVE to know, however, a good

way to get beyond that "new" feeling, in regards to fingerboards, and frets. That "new"

feeling, has always been something I've wanted to get away from, as quickly as possible.

I know that oiling the figerboard, helps...most are way too dry, when you first get them.

But, are there other (quicker) ways, of getting that "played in" feeling, from a new guitar,

without sacrificing looks, or durability, in those areas. And, something besides the old

stand-by answer of "Just Play the Hell out of it, Dummy!" LOL Or...ARE there any good,

viable shortcuts??? [unsure]

 

 

I mean, they relic them, to make them look (and feel) "vintage", and well worn, and played.

I just want the "well played" feel (sooner) without the well worn aspect. [biggrin]

 

Any ideas, or things (fret dressing/polishing, etc., you guys have done, or any suggestions,

would be greatly appreciated. [thumbup]

 

CB

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But on a serious note,,

I'm not sure what feel you don't like about it but when I got my frets dressed

on my LP CC it made a huge difference in the feel of it.

 

But for me I didn't like how high the frets were, now it's perfect.

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But on a serious note,,

I'm not sure what feel you don't like about it but when I got my frets dressed

on my LP CC it made a huge difference in the feel of it.

 

But for me I didn't like how high the frets were, now it's perfect.

 

Yeah, I had the frets dressed and polished on my 2000 LP Classic,

and it went from not getting played much, to not being able to put

it down, except when I'm playing one of my SG's. So, that may be

the real "key" to this, for me, on my other's as well? I've always

liked the more rounded frets, on my Epi's, to the sharper edged Gibson

frets, as well. Although, I will admit, the recent Gibson's (last 2-3 years)

have been a LOT better, right out of the box.

 

Anyway, thanks, quapman...for your answer, and suggestion. [thumbup][biggrin]

 

CB

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I think there are many good deals in the used market. It does, however, take some looking around. I find the last day of guitar shows particularly good for bargains. Are you likely to find exactly what you want going to a guitar show? No. But you will find something cool and as long as you don't mind wheeling and dealing a bit, you can get a decent price on a worn in instrument.

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I remember when I first got my Les Paul and dealing with the sticky nitro neck and also slightly high frets.

 

As far as the nitro on the neck, I just kept wiping it down. But for the frets I would set the guitar on my lap, facing up, and press down on each string as if fretting and then rub the string back and forth to simulate wide string bends. I did this on all strings up and down the fretboard. I never read or had anyone tell me to do this, and it might not even be a good idea. :-k But that's what I did to kind of break-in my fretboard a little quicker than normal playing would have done.

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