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Simple Question


cwgatti

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Hello and welcome to the Forums!

 

Mainly physical size.

 

There a couple of variations of both size Gibson humbucking pickups with different designs and output levels.

 

There are two(?) minis: 1. The "Epiphone New York" as used in the Les Paul Deluxe and the Firebird (not sure about the latter, please someone confirm). 2. The new rail-type mini as used in the first-run of the 70s Tribute LPs.

 

There are a whole bunch of full-size humbuckers: 1. The ceramic ones: 496/500. 2. The different AlNiCo magnet ones: 490/498, '57 Classic and Classic Plus, Super '74, Burstbucker 1,2,3, Pros, Dirty fingers. These differ in output and the AlNiCo magnet used in them.

 

I guess, there will be a lot of replies with more detailed explanations. :)

 

Cheers... Bence

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Hello and welcome to the Forums!

 

Mainly physical size.

 

There a couple of variations of both size Gibson humbucking pickups with different designs and output levels.

 

There are two(?) minis: 1. The "Epiphone New York" as used in the Les Paul Deluxe and the Firebird (not sure about the latter, please someone confirm). 2. The new rail-type mini as used in the first-run of the 70s Tribute LPs.

 

There are a whole bunch of full-size humbuckers: 1. The ceramic ones: 496/500. 2. The different AlNiCo magnet ones: 490/498, '57 Classic and Classic Plus, Super '74, Burstbucker 1,2,3, Pros, Dirty fingers. These differ in output and the AlNiCo magnet used in them.

 

I guess, there will be a lot of replies with more detailed explanations. :)

 

Cheers... Bence

The Dirty Fingers pickups have one ceramic magnet each, like the 496R. The 500T features three ceramic magnets.

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" The "Epiphone New York" as used in the Les Paul Deluxe "

 

I am going to buy a 2012 LP Deluxe Gold Top. IS this a "cheaper" version of the Standard?

I would assume it has the Epiphone mini p/u. What kinda tone do you typically expect from these p/u?

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Hello!

 

After Gibson purchased it's former biggest opponent The Epihpone Company in 1957, Epi instruments became identical to Gibsons. Probably the only article that had the opposite fate was the Epiphone "New York" humbucker.

 

In those days, the Epiphone brand wasn't associated with cheap Gibson copies. It was an up-market maker.

 

The LP Deluxe appeared after Gibson reintroduced the Les Paul model in 1968, after an 8-year hiatus. It had the minis, as they fitted into the bodies that were carved out for the Gibson P-90 single-coil pickups. The Deluxe is a separate model, it's not a cheaper version of the Standard, which wasn't offered as a regular-run model at that time. It could be custom-ordered with full-size humbuckers in the early 70s.

 

The minis sound brighter. If You have a chance, test a couple of instruments with both type of pickups. Or at least check out a couple of Youtube videos.

 

The Deluxe.

 

The Standard

 

Hope it helps... Bence

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Actually, "New York" pickups, and Mini-Humbuckers, are quite different.

They do have a similar look, but "New York" pickups, were Single Coil!

The first Gibson produced Sheratons, had the "New York" (single coil) pickups,

of left over stock, from Epiphone, from 1958, until the '61 models, came out

with the "mini-humbuckers," replacing the single coil "New York" pickups.

 

http://search.aol.com/aol/imageDetails?s_it=imageDetails&q=Epiphone+Sheraton+w%2F+%22new+york%22+pickups&img=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pinrepair.com%2Fvgi%2Fepiphone%2F60_sheraton_3.jpg&v_t=comsearch51&host=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.provide.net%2F%7Ecfh%2Fsheraton.html&width=181&height=126&thumbUrl=http%3A%2F%2Ft3.gstatic.com%2Fimages%3Fq%3Dtbn%3AANd9GcSK2ddoWenLaEUqdzTtbRoK__iz7sfd5uymdZ2TkbNX5ZrgBygbl_sNzbsIZw%3Awww.pinrepair.com%2Fvgi%2Fepiphone%2F60_sheraton_3.jpg&b=image%3Fq%3DEpiphone%2BSheraton%2Bw%252F%2B%2522new%2Byork%2522%2Bpickups%26v_t%3Dcomsearch51%26s_it%3DimageResultsBack%26oreq%3Df66ccf27e62e46759aee0cde5e608bbb&imgHeight=700&imgWidth=1000&imgTitle=Epiphone+Sheraton+guitar+Gibson+ES335+guitar+info+thinline&imgSize=123599&hostName=home.provide.net

 

 

These, which were later changed, to Mini-Humbuckers. Mini-Humbuckers,

are dual coil, like regular sized humbuckers, only smaller. The term

"New York pickups" AKA "New York Mini-humbuckers" names, or designation,

are often used as being the same, but there really quite different.

The actual "New York" pickups, would be more closely akin to a smaller

(brighter sounding) P-90.

 

 

From Wikipedia (below)...which also uses the term "New York Humbuckers"...

 

1968-69 Les Paul "Deluxe"

 

The Deluxe was among the "new" 1968 Les Pauls. This model featured "mini-humbuckers", also known as "New York" humbuckers, and did not initially prove popular. The mini-humbucker pickup fit into the pre-carved P-90 pickup cavity using an adaptor ring developed by Gibson (actually just a cut-out P90 pickup cover). The DeLuxe was introduced in late 1968 and helped to standardize production among Gibson's US-built Les Pauls. The first incarnation of the Deluxe featured a one-piece body and slim three-piece neck in late 1968. The "pancake" body (thin layer of maple on top of two layers of Honduran mahogany) came later in 1969. In late 1969, a small "volute" was added. 1969 Deluxes feature the Gibson logo devoid of the dot over the "i" in Gibson. By late 1969/early 1970, the dot over the "i" had returned, plus a "Made In USA" stamp on the back of the headstock. The Deluxe could be special ordered with full-size Humbucker T-Top pickups, these full size versions of the Deluxe were "Standard" spec. They were also available with "Gibson" embossed pickups in 1972 only and considered rare, as only 9 were produced. David Bowie Can be seen playing one of the 1972 "Standards" in his 1972 release Jean Genie video. By 1975, the neck construction was changed from mahogany to maple, until the early 1980s, when the construction was returned to mahogany. The body changed back to solid mahogany from the pancake design in late 1976 or early 1977. Interest in this particular Les Paul model was so low that in 1985, Gibson canceled the line. However, in 2005, the Deluxe was with more popularity due to its association with Pete Townshend [1] and Thin Lizzy.

 

In 1978 the Les Paul Pro Deluxe was introduced. This guitar featured P-90 pickups instead of the "mini-humbuckers" of the Deluxe model, an ebony fingerboard, maple neck, mahogany body and chrome hardware. It came in Ebony, Cherry Sunburst, Tobacco Sunburst or Gold finishes. Interestingly, it was first launched in Europe, rather than the US. It was discontinued in 1983.

 

 

 

CB

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So, would THIS be the Gibson Les Paul Deluxe w/ mini humbuckers?

 

 

Yes! Personally, I've always felt like the LP Deluxe had a bit more

"Twang" factor, going on, due to the mini-humbuckers, and you can

hear a bit of that, on the beggining of "Roadrunner" song, and as

Pete cleans it up, toward moving into "My Generation." [thumbup]

The more "mid-range" growl, is noticeable, toward the end of that

song, as well. Mini's are just a bit "edgier" than the full size

humbuckers, IMHO.

 

CB

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To make matters more confusing, aren't the new mini-humbuckers "high output" and made with ceramic magnets? If so, I would expect that older Deluxes to sound brighter than anything with the new ceramic pups in them. Can anyone tell me which minis are in these 2012 Les Paul?

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My new Firebird has the mini-humbuckers, and they are a totally different animal from the full-size ones. Yes, very twangy and really cut through the mix, and tonally completely different. However, they have lower output - my 97 LP Classic has loads more sustain and drive. For this reason, I don't play the Firebird that much, because it would mean I have to change all the tone and drive settings on my amp every time I want to use it.

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My new Firebird has the mini-humbuckers, and they are a totally different animal from the full-size ones. Yes, very twangy and really cut through the mix, and tonally completely different. However, they have lower output - my 97 LP Classic has loads more sustain and drive. For this reason, I don't play the Firebird that much, because it would mean I have to change all the tone and drive settings on my amp every time I want to use it.

 

Andy, ever tried an EQ pedal? I have a similar issue,

going from Gibson's, to Fenders, to Ric-12 Strings,

as to tonality, and output differences. EQ pedals,

have "saved the day," for me. Although, I don't really

mind resetting my amp, as/if needed. The pedal just

makes it easier. With the Ric-12 string, I add a

compressor/sustainer pedal, as well. Won't play IT,

without one.

 

Cheers,

 

CB

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The Dirty Fingers pickups have one ceramic magnet each, like the 496R. The 500T features three ceramic magnets.

 

 

Hello Capmaster!

 

Right! Sorry. Rushed...

 

Cheers... Bence

 

 

Hello!

 

Some more information: http://www2.gibson.com/news-lifestyle/features/en-us/humbuckers-1013-2011.aspx

 

Cheers... Bence

[blush] Sorry, this time it was my fault. The Dirty Fingers pickups do also have three ceramic magnets each.

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