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You cannot serve two masters... you will hate one and love the other..


AndyK

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I only have two guitars: my LP Classic and my Firebird V. In the past, I've had up to four guitars, but my problem is always this: I love the Les Paul so much more than any other guitar I've ever had, to the point where I hardly play anything else. And if I do, I only do it out of guilt that the other guitar is just sat there unused (part of the reason I only have two - the other being finance-related!). Just today, I decided to play the Firebird (a beautiful guitar I dearly wanted, and took a lot of effort in actually getting it). I plugged her in, messed around with amp EQs and drive, and got a decent sound. I played a few songs. I unplugged her, and plugged in the Les Paul... and just like every time I do, I marvelled at the beautiful neck, the way she fits into my torso just right, the gorgeous pickups: more drive, smooth, but with a twang on the top strings too. Just so much better than any other guitar I've had - why else would I play any other? Why else would I love any other??

 

Am I alone in this? :unsure:

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Am I alone in this? :unsure:

Nope.

 

I play my #1 Lester 95% of the time.

Having said that; recently another forumite and I hired a rehearsal studio for four hours and I played my #1 and #2 in roughly equal measure.

The #1 sounds just perfect at any volume level whereas the #2 (which has a matched pair of SD Antiquities) only really comes fully alive when she's let off the decibel leash (as it were). Don't know why. The p'ups?

The other pair of Pauls were still in storage (from July!) until I got them re-installed at my chair-side just two days ago. I'm intending to take those two along the next time we go for a blast.

 

I play my 1940's G-Jazzer in the mornings when I'm waiting, patiently, for my daughter to get ready for school. As this can take a while I'm getting the hang of the guit...

My Tele I occasionally grab for a bit of twangy fun.

The Strat came out of storage with the LPs so I hope to play her with more regularity from now on.

The rest don't get played except out of a feeling of guilt and/or curiosity.

 

P.

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I love guitars, plural. I had my Les Paul out the other day, and I loved it just as much as the last time I used it, I'm not sure when that was. I had my tele out that day, and I loved it just as much as ever. They each do different things, they are different things, and we have them all for different reasons. I love them all, I have nine currently, I'd like a few more before I'm done, for different reasons. I need a hollowbody jazz box, I don't have one. Sorrento probably one of these days. I need an Esquire, haven't had one in a long time, it's a great piece of guitar history that does what only an Esquire can do. I dearly love them all.

 

rct

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35 guitars here, no personal favorites, usually play 3 or 4 different guitars every day, from slide, to rock to blues to pop, classical to bossa nova and on.

 

Example; recording 'Lifes' been good to me or say "hold the line" the LP classic custom has the nice distorted rhythm I am looking for.

 

Steeley Dan lead = PRS SE

 

Kenny Wayne Shepard = Strat

 

Classical - Takemine or Guild

 

I think you get the idea.

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No mention of acoustics...

 

Yet... <_<

 

Moi enjoys the luxury of representatives of most types of guitar

 

From Fender S/C's through Gibson H/B's, P90's etc

 

In solid, semi and hollow configurations

 

Plus an acoustic or two... :blink:

 

6 and 12 string

 

I play them all as mood and gigs dictate

 

Life can be good... [thumbup]

 

V

 

:-({|=

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I tend to go with Shrek's comment that, "We love every guitar we have with a passion, they are our world."

 

Mostly the past year or so I've been playing archtops. But when I was preparing for a blizzard-cancelled cowboy music gig, I was using a similar-sized flattop.

 

Depends on what looks ahead, but mostly the 16-inch 24 3/4 scale archtops the past while or so.

 

I feel more comfortable with those instruments but I figure this, too, different guitars to an extent will encourage different feel for playing and therefore a bit different playing even if it's technically the same notes.

 

m

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In my case, music is the master. Playing songs created by my bandmates and myself, I am slave to these creations. Any instrument I play has to share this slavery I am addicted to. So when it is about music, singing, playing, the colour of sounds, the instruments work as tools, like the Latin word instrumentum means tool.

 

For me, loving creating music doesn't mean loving one specific instrument but using the appropriate one. The song is the master I want to serve, and there is no loving one guitar and hating another. I care for them all, they deserve my passion and caution to keep them in fine condition since they have to serve me in being a servant myself.

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In my case, music is the master. Playing songs created by my bandmates and myself, I am slave to these creations. Any instrument I play has to share this slavery I am addicted to. So when it is about music, singing, playing, the colour of sounds, the instruments work as tools, like the Latin word instrumentum means tool.

 

For me, loving creating music doesn't mean loving one specific instrument but using the appropriate one. The song is the master I want to serve, and there is no loving one guitar and hating another. I care for them all, they deserve my passion and caution to keep them in fine condition since they have to serve me in being a servant myself.

 

 

This! +1

 

CB

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i'm sometimes asked which guitar is my favorite. i always say theyre like my kids. i love them all equally. i'll play my LP standard and think, god i love this guitar. then i'll play my PRS custom 24 and think, jeez this thing is sweet, then i'll take out my LP Classic and think my god this is nice, then i'll drag out my old '72 Strat and think ahhh, my old friend. i love them all.

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Although I don't have as many guitars as Markini has-I only have 32- I constantly rotate my guitars that I have out to play,I guess you could call me an equal opportunity guitarist.Even though I do have my favourites-my '65 John Lennon Casino that was one of the first 50 made and my '65 Strat- the Casino is the most comfortable guitar that I ever played but I insist on going through all my guitars as each one has its own unique voice,even several examples of the same model can sound quite different from each other while still having the signature tone of that particular model.I find the tonal differences of guitars to be fascinating as some of these guitars sound out of this world and it would be a sin just to leave them sitting unplayed in their cases from year to year, especially guitars such as the Vox Phantom XII which sounds like it could be a Strat/Harpsichord hybrid.It's true what they say "Variety is the spice of life."

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When I bought my Parker DF all my other guitars got jealous. I haven't put an hour total on my Gibson ES and Epiphone Casino since my Parker arrived. I like the Parker so much I'm having a second, custom one made with Duncan P-Rails (should arrive by the end of the month). Then I'll have one for the gig and one for the studio.

 

I plan to eventually sell the 1970 ES-330 and keep the Casino. Neither needs to be plugged in, so figuring out chords can be easier. But I don't need two.

 

I don't think of me serving the guitars, but the guitars as serving me. And right now, the Parker serves me better than the others that I own.

 

Insights and incites by Notes

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Try as I may, to the contrary, I still manage to play some of my guitars,

more than other's. But, they're all important to me. IF/When they stop

being so, I'll sell them, or pass them down. I love having the diversity,

of tone, and look/styles as well. Some just work better than other's for

a particular song/style. Why limit one's self, if you don't have to?

 

With some folks, one sound becomes their "Signature" sound. BB King, for

one, Willie Nelson, Roger McGuinn's Ric 12-string, etc. But, for most of

us "lesser gods," variety IS the spice of life. Nothing wrong with that! [thumbup]

 

 

CB

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I suspect anyone who loves one guitar above all others is both extremely comfortable with it physically AND tends to play the same styles of music on the regular.

 

I am not suggesting that an LP can only do rock/blues, but I know when I want raunchy power my LP is my best bet. Prince always plays Tele/Strat. I mean...I know he's little but I don't think he picks the guitars based on weight. He plays the same style and the Tele/Strat thing works well for his sound.

 

Here is why I have several guitars;

 

1. Changing guitars makes me a better player. I do appreciate the concept of learning one guitar so well its like a part of you and you never look down at the fret or dials, but I sort of like being able to go from short scale to long to a higher action and larger gauge to acoustic. We've discussed this before. Switching guitars can make you a better player.

 

2. Different needs require different guitars.

Physically, I find my "Duo Sonic" most comfortable of my whole pack. Duo Sonic is FUN for HOURS!

I can play the LP for 45 minutes but after I'm hurting. Trust me, if I had a belt of giant strength I'd play it way more often. Its a pleasure to play for the feel of the quality and the sound but my body renegades.

The Strat is single coil, which for years sounded weak to me (don't hurt me) but I can get just enough raunch from her with the right amp setting and dial in my 90s sound (Lace pups). Also, the combination of it being ergonomic and lite makes it great for playing out/ practicing with people. Sounds better than the Duo Sonic, of course, but is way less straining than my LP.

 

There will come a day when the LP gets back in the coffin and out will come my SG. The HB sound will be covered (with a bit less RAW power) and the change to a thinner than normal neck will make me switch chords at lightning speed. There is the element of guitar switching making me better at playing.

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I think that in ways, the same guitar can have different labels on it, and even look quite different. There are a lot of archtops, even flattops that have the same proportions and scale as an ES175, for example. With similar setup and strings, a lotta guitars will feel little different regardless of pups, etc.

 

So I watch Joe Pass vids and see little difference in technical concept in what he's doing. And mostly, of course, he used the 175. I can't think of anyone with more technical ability than Pass. OTOH, one can see a YouTube vid of the guy with a Fender Jag and it's incredible playing on a quite different sort of instrument. Segovia has been written up as using a different guitar every year or so, albeit all are roughly the same dimensions and scale.

 

Chet Atkins played a number of different shapes and types, and I'm sure would have been quite as able on a board guitar as on various other types.

 

The advantage to the one "size" is that it's probably faster to become intuitive with one's playing. The electric stuff is, IMHO, almost irrelevant. Graft Strat pups onto an ES175 body and it's still playing as a 175. Or vice versa.

 

Kottke plays a number of different sorts of acoustic/AE guitars and I don't know about scale, etc., on them.

 

Bottom line is that I'm pretty much with Izzy on this. I'm most comfortable with the 175 proportions which are awfully similar to a classical guitar. I will play an SG type with a different geometry which makes some things easier and some more difficult. My semis really feel different to me, and so do my big-box "long scale" AEs - but I also use them for different material and technique so I'm not sure what all that means.

 

Just thought of an analogy. It's kinda like going to dinner with my brother and his wife compared to going to dinner with my sister and her husband. We talk about different things that have to do with different regions of the country and different sorts of commonalities among us. The affection is no less in either case.

 

m

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I think what Capmaster and RCT said,, both post nails it for me too.

 

I have a closet full, I'm currently at 17, (3 are what I would say are exceptions cuz they're not really ones I play. one was a nylon string that I found on the road side while walking the hounds one morning on trash pickup day (rescued), another is an Epi EB bass that I picked up for like 50 bucks (I just dabble on bass), and the other one is a pawn shop score that lives in Florida with my wife's sister... when we are there for a visit, I have a decent guitar to bang on.

 

the other 14 are all "here for a reason"

 

Although I do tend to use the Gibson's more at rehearsals,, the archtops get a lot of use around the house killing time, the fenders come out when I'm in "that kind of mood" and the 4 acoustics,, okay I admit that is a bit over kill... well for three of them anyway, one is a nylon string so it don't count.

 

But I have a lovely 78 yari Dy74 that I just refuse to part with. the other two.. well what can I say? I like taylors... and they both followed me home one day.

 

I can honestly say that I do tend to use all of them at some point over the course of the average month. And like Rich says, when I do so, I find them just as inspiring as the last time I opened up the case and gave em a spin.

 

 

could I downsize? yep.. and should the day come that I need to, I will.. but that day aint today! [thumbup]

 

/ray

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It's funny (in a good sense) how people seem to attach some emotional

characteristics, to our instruments, or other inanimate objects, even

our cars. As if they had "feelings" to be hurt, or at least shared? LOL

It's quite common, but I've always wondered "why" we tend to do that?

(And, I'm as "guilty" as anyone, in that regard.) [biggrin]

 

CB

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Most of my guitars are different from one another, with a few minor similarities. One was purchased for its similarities to my first guitar as a backup, but even that one is different from my others. I bought unique guitars for my collection because I want diversity, I don't want to sound like everyone else and I wanted to try different types to see what really suited me.

 

I have several solid bodies. I played one with no backup for 2o years. I will occasionally break one out to play.

 

I discovered, I don't really care for single coils. I just can't abide the hum. I only have one Strat and it's a Squier with upgraded electronics and great playability. It only cost me $150 after upgrades, so I don't feel guilty keeping it and not playing it very often and I have it if I want a Strat for something.

 

I have one electric 12 string, it's definitely just a utility guitar, great little 12 string, but I don't use it often, just when I need a 12 string.

 

I discovered I like hollow and semihollows, so my collection has grown in that area. I almost always reach for one of these. My latest purchase Midtown Kalamazoo will probably become my go-to guitar as this is the direction I have been leaning.

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I'm not so certain about dumping an instrument you don't feel you're bonding with.

 

For example, see the little archtop in my avatar?

 

Got it in the earlier '70s. Wore flats... then tapewounds.

 

Sat in a case from maybe '76 to around 2002. Just never ... got it on ... with the guitar.

 

But I didn't dump it. Don't ask why. I dunno.

 

Got an odd thought; put 9s on it.

 

Favorite now...

 

m

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...I'm not so certain about dumping an instrument you don't feel you're bonding with....

Oddly enough, milod, after writing my response (yesterday) I got out my least-liked LP today for a couple of hours and finally started - after perhaps three years - to fully come to terms with the neck profile.

I almost enjoyed it's beefiness.........[scared]..........that was a huge surprise.

I'm guessing it's partly down to the amount I've been playing my G-J archtop recently - which is less 'baseball-bat' and more 'telegraph-pole'.

 

P.

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Yeah, I think there's something about guitars you may not bond with but... regardless you tend to "dump" those you just don't care for, you just wanna let one or two sit and wait. I don't know if it's the guitar waiting for the player to change or the player simply changing - something we all do...

 

There was, for me, something of a gut feeling I wanted this one but not then. Don't ask how. It just was.

 

m

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