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Gibson J160e - News?


Folkestone

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Hi:

I have a recent (2012) Gibson J160e which I purchased from a friend who wasn't using it. I wanted a second guitar. I slapped new medium strings on it and it sounds incredible unplugged and plugged.

 

I surfed the net to try find more info on it beyond basic specs and couldn't even find it on the Gibson website. I'm not referring to the Lennon model but the one with solid tonewoods. Were they discontinued? If so, does anyone know why? Does anyone out there currently use one? Any interesting anecdotes?

 

Thanks,

Jeff

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Jeff ,

 

they are not actually discontinued completely but the acoustic plant has shutdown ordering custom acoustics for a while (it was a corporate decision that came from gibson headquarters in nashville) ... that means they are only offering some models as standard production for this year .

and they are offering special editions of some guitars or models that maybe limited to 20, 50 or 100 guitars depending on the model .

I haven't seen them offer a J160E this year though .

 

 

can you post photos of the guitar you have ? that way maybe we can give you more info .

to post photos here on the forum first you need to have and account on Photobucket to upload photos there ... then you can paste the Image links over here .

 

 

 

 

 

but I suspect that your guitar was special production .

 

 

 

 

JC

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I believe the OP is talking about the J-160E Standard that was pretty much a regular J-45 with a stacked P-100 pickup. These have little in common with any J-160E made in the past and was pretty much the same thing as slapping a Dearmond 210 pickup across the soundhole a J-45 although you do get those nice volume and tone controls and jack.

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... you do get those nice volume and tone controls and jack.

Plus improved access to the 15th fret.

 

Come to think of it, everyone seems to accept that there is a big difference between a 12-fretter and a 14-fretter. So why not a significant difference between a 14-fretter and a 15-fretter?

 

-- Bob R

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Personally I love 12 fretters and will always keep a couple around. But having played a '54 and an early '55 ladder braced J-160Es with a solid top I can't believe the Bozeman version do not sound better unplugged. There is a reason I did not seriously consider buying either of the older ones. But there was no way to get around it that those guitars did have a very cool vibe thing going on.

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Come to think of it, everyone seems to accept that there is a big difference between a 12-fretter and a 14-fretter. So why not a significant difference between a 14-fretter and a 15-fretter?

 

-- Bob R

 

As a J-45 and J-160E player, I think there is too, rar. Having 15 frets clear of the body causes the bridge to be moved from the fatter part of the soundboard to the more narrow part. The result, I think, is a tone that's less warm and resonant and more cutting and percussive than a similar 14 fret guitar.

 

A 12 fret guitar has its bridge in the very fattest part of the soundboard, which results in even richer tone.

 

That's my experience, anyway.

 

Red 333

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  • 3 weeks later...

Speaking of the J-160E, I have a 1956 model that I'm working on. I'm looking for the bridge adjust parts and they are really difficult to find. The bridge is the early type with the large saddle height adjust thumb screws on either foot of the bridge.

 

Any ideas where I might find this hardware?post-61660-020505800 1386341566_thumb.jpg

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