Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Lu Ruello

When did YOU last BUY music?

Recommended Posts

Uh, a few days ago. I get CD's and vinyls shipped in all the time. Digital is the superior one if in the right quality but that quality is still uber rare and won't be properly released to the masses for a while.

 

Though nothing is quite as good as vinyl, especially metal. Distortion always get through better on a record then any digital download or CD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I still buy music some. Sitting right here by my computer are a few discs I've bought recently from Witchcraft, Scorpion Child, Kadavar, and Carousel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#1. Does iTunes know this? Because they are your digital distributor, and they don't want other distributors profiting from digital copies of material that they basically have the digital distribution rights, because you pay them, iTunes, directly or through your publishing. So they are compensated for distributing your work and compensating you.

 

 

 

 

I think I'll try tunecore seeing they get a chunk and they were the ones who signed me up to ITunes rct.

 

 

 

#2. What is a "free download on a few pay subscriber sites"??? Is it free, or is it pay?

 

 

 

 

The subscribers pay to join the site and in return they get to download or stream as much music as they want!

 

 

 

#3. Who is PPCA? Why aren't you talking to your publishing or to iTunes?

 

 

 

 

PPCA is the mob who look after your mechanical royalties. So far no reply and its been weeks.

 

rct

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO the problem isn't with musicians not knowing about their copyright "rights," the problem is a combination of today's means of "distribution" one way or another, and also with the so-called licensing agencies, ASCAP and BMI in the U.S. and their national equivalents elsewhere.

 

Even current copyright law essentially is pre-internet. However, the perspectives involved are after recording capabilities were made inexpensive through various sorts of tape - even before recording music or videos was common on computers of various sorts.

 

I don't have answers to "protection" of anyone's creative endeavors, whether my words and photography or anyone's music.

 

Before the DMCA, the current copyright law in the U.S., and its equivalent elsewhere, I did a lot of copyright work. I've done more than a bit since.

 

Bottom line is that one can seek to mark one's work with copyright symbols of the appropriate sort, but functionally there's no way to entirely protect the work, especially if the 'thief' is not making money on it.

 

Secondly, if one of us wrote a fine piece of music, put it on the Internet with appropriate copyright notice (which at that point has nothing to do with YouTube but more with establishment of rights for future potential litigation), and someone else "used" the material, for remuneration or not, all that might be done legally would be an order restraining further use of that material. The exception would be if the piece had been formally registered for copyright with payment, etc. In that latter case, the copyright owner then has the potential in litigation to request monetary damages.

 

Now, in the case of ASCAP and BMI and other nations' equivalents, the question whether Izzy (for example) would get a nickel is rather interesting because there is no mode of determining the use of her material in the public performance by others. Period. In fact, even if she objected to the Rolling Stones using her piece only in concert, she would have some rather extensive litigation to get a restraining order.

 

ASCAP and BMI do require blanket licenses from various venues, but (regardless of some instances), functionally do not in any case distribute money to their registered artists for live performance. In fact, only "publishing" or "broadcast instances" would be covered in whether or not Izzy gets a nickel. Given that it's entirely likely that even 100 radio broadcasts with Izzy's piece would not be caught in their proprietary (secret) sampling method that rewards the publisher as well as artist(s) or author.

 

I'd call it a matter where practice trumps theory - and there likely should be a complete overhaul of the system given current technology and questions of security on Internet sites - and questions whether it is legal to "close down" an individual's cloud given that such "cloud space" contains intellectual material not owned by the cloud operator. In short, we've a potential application of property rights on digital properties that may be rather interesting.

 

m

 

Here in Australia, the performer using an original song, regardless of who wrote it, should submit a performance return indicating the song details to APRA, our live performance collector here. Of course, original songwriter /performers will do their duty as they perform their own songs each night, but I seriously doubt any cover bands are submitting their "KISS tribute band" gig lists at all as they get jack-all for it despite they're make a living from someone else's music.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two weekends ago…

 

Went to Amoeba Music in Hollywood and bought two CD's:

 

"Seasons Of Your Day" by Mazzy Star, and "All For Nothing" by The Replacements.

 

[thumbup][thumbup]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't stream my music, but I *DO* own an iPod. I own records, cassettes and CD's. I enjoy listening to music when I am out and about, it would be rather tricky and cumbersome for me to carry all of them and my stereo with me everywhere I go and I don't think Home Depot sells extension cords that are hundreds of miles long! [tongue]

 

Seriously, I own an iPod solely for the portability. If the husband and I are out and we want to listen to Baby Grand's Ancient Medicine album, we can!

 

So please, Mighty Curmudgeons, don't bludgeon me! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always buy as musicians lose out by streaming.

 

I have resisted going totally mp3 for my music. It was bad enough when I had to switch from vinyl LP's to CD's... but that's where it stopped for me.

 

I do own an iPod, and I have downloaded music from iTunes, etc. But for me, music is intrinsically attached to art. So I will always prefer to have an actual tangible thing—with some kind of booklet, etc. to hold and look through—that I get my music to play off of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darling...

 

At my age, one might assume I'm a curmudgeon. In ways, perhaps, but IMHO at some point we'll be pretty much entirely a digital music culture except at best a small niche market - such as those who treasure and occasionally play early cylinder and 78 rpm disk recordings but who also make digital reproductions and perhaps add static removal through a bit of editing.

 

I see some tremendous weaknesses and deep concerns in the world going all digital on music and other sorts of recordings, but given a number of cultural changes as well as tech changes, I think we're almost certainly going to be 95 percent digital within 20, if not 10 years.

 

m

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darling...

I think we're almost certainly going to be 95 percent digital within 20, if not 10 years.

 

m

 

In my profession we are now 95% digital with the exception of faxes (~5% of what we do).

I think music will be 99% digital within the next 5 years.

 

I last bought music 2 days ago on itunes, where I buy all of my music now. RIP Steve Jobs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to pay for my music. I am a composer myself and therefore I gladly pay for music I like to support my fellow musicians with whatever I can affort. A Premium Spotify account and occational tracks from iTunes is my contribution.

Support good music!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darling...

 

At my age, one might assume I'm a curmudgeon. In ways, perhaps, but IMHO at some point we'll be pretty much entirely a digital music culture except at best a small niche market - such as those who treasure and occasionally play early cylinder and 78 rpm disk recordings but who also make digital reproductions and perhaps add static removal through a bit of editing.

 

I see some tremendous weaknesses and deep concerns in the world going all digital on music and other sorts of recordings, but given a number of cultural changes as well as tech changes, I think we're almost certainly going to be 95 percent digital within 20, if not 10 years.

 

m

 

milod, you are probably right. But we've all seen the "resurgence" (if you can even call it that—quotation marks or not!) of vinyl in recent years. A friend of mine purchased a very cool vintage Blaupunkt (sp?) phonograph some years ago, and has rebuilt his vinyl collection. We play LP's whenever we get together at his house for parties, etc.

 

I see the same weaknesses and concerns as you. Just like all recent technologies that have taken a hold of our world, not all of it is good or positive. At any rate, I will continue to buy CD's so long as they are available. I want to have that thing—and not just an invisible digital file.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my profession we are now 95% digital with the exception of faxes (~5% of what we do).

I think music will be 99% digital within the next 5 years.

 

I last bought music 2 days ago on itunes, where I buy all of my music now. RIP Steve Jobs.

 

For me, record stores are something that should never be forsaken. It troubles me every time I hear about the closure of a great shop. Cutler's Records in New Haven, CT was forced to close its doors several years ago—done-in by the digital age. Now that I live in So. Cal, I go to Amoeba Music. I can't imagine that store going away. If it ever does, it will be a sad, sad day indeed.

 

With every technological advancement, it seems we keep losing human interaction—the "human touch". Maybe it's inevitable… but I'll resist it as long as I am able to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we've all seen the "resurgence" (if you can even call it that—quotation marks or not!) of vinyl in recent years. A friend of mine purchased a very cool vintage Blaupunkt (sp?) phonograph some years ago, and has rebuilt his vinyl collection. We play LP's whenever we get together at his house for parties, etc.

 

 

This is true and is the glimmer of hope I am clinging to.

 

I have my fingers crossed that the market will one day yank those damn ear buds out and start spinning the vinyl again.

 

 

By the way,, it's so damn cold here today I saw a teenager with his pants pulled up!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said, I think we've a niche market for "antiques" such as vinyls and earlier 78 rpm records.

 

But don't forget how quickly the 4 and 8-track tapes and players disappeared - not to mention Sony's Beta VCRs and now any VCRs. There are a few reel-to-reel machines out there too but...

 

Camera film of all sizes is disappearing.

 

As for buying music to support the artists, if I believed it would do so, I'd do some things differently. I don't. Then again, in my line of work cynicism is not uncommon.

 

Weather?

 

Quap, you're probably chillier. This morning it's warmed up to -8F (-22C) from about -18F (-28C). Wind is a bit stiff, so wind chills are around -30F (-35C) but the sun's shining. Should be about the same tonight and tomorrow.

 

m

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said, I think we've a niche market for "antiques" such as vinyls and earlier 78 rpm records.

 

 

No Dude,,not antiques, actual new pressings. Check this out.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/10/arts/music/vinyl-records-are-making-a-comeback.html

 

 

 

 

Weather?

 

Quap, you're probably chillier. This morning it's warmed up to -8F (-22C) from about -18F (-28C). Wind is a bit stiff, so wind chills are around -30F (-35C) but the sun's shining. Should be about the same tonight and tomorrow.

 

m

 

 

Yep,, chillier here. Supposed to warm up to -26C

Right now it's -27

-39C with the windchill(was -41C this morning)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I'm quite aware that there are new pressings... although in my neck of the woods one never sees any.

 

But it's rather like my mid 19th Century uniform for living history presentations: It's new, but it's antique.

 

m

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When did I last buy music?

 

Two days ago and my 12 volume CD set of Chris Rea's Blue Guitars was delivered today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

last time I bought music was late july/early august this year [smile]

... and it was for the simple reason to have something in my car to listen to while

driving to Stockholm to visit my stepbrother and his family [biggrin]

 

what I bought?

 

220px-Ghost_-_infestissumam_cover.jpg and 220px-Black_Sabbath_13.jpg

 

let me tell you, Ghost is simply AMAZING [love]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some local friends of mine's CD's, about 4 months ago. I do have a large CD collection (and lots of DVDs to) that I paid for with money but I've been poor for 3 years now so I don't buy much any more, but I want to support my friends as they have done the same to me in the past.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1387518730[/url]' post='1463587']

Some local friends of mine's CD's, about 4 months ago. I do have a large CD collection (and lots of DVDs to) that I paid for with money but I've been poor for 3 years now so I don't buy much any more, but I want to support my friends as they have done the same to me in the past.

 

It was just a week past Friday I was in a new and used record and cd shop on Edinburgh's Leith Walk. The choice of jazz and blues is much better than the likes of HMV.Amazon I think is excellent for albums and artists which may be obscure. Without the internet and Amazon I would never own such an album like Lin Surface by Alan Silva.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to buy some today: Frank Zappa's Roxy and Elsewhere released on 180 gm vinyl.

 

The CD may eventually go the way of the 8 track tape but digital downloads will never replace real vinyl albums.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...