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Happy Thanksgiving


4Hayden

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Guest Farnsbarns

No way, no fo pa at all.

 

Thanksgiving, nothing more than the settlers that lived through a pretty bad boat ride, sitting down with the representatives of the new nation that the settlers had found, and contributing what each could to a meal.

 

Not particularly religious, more "American" than anything else.

 

And then, like good Americans, we stole all of their resources and killed their womens and chillens. The end.

 

rct

 

Ha! I can't help but think... It wasn't Americans, at least not at the time, you (they) were still British and other Europeans. I think we need to own that one really.

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Ha! I can't help but think... It wasn't Americans, at least not at the time, you (they) were still British and other Europeans. I think we need to own that one really.

 

Contemporaneous reports indicate that the food was actually good so, kinda rules you guys out.

 

rct

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Farns...

 

There's a degree of religiousness that varies.

 

I'm reminded by the way George Washington referred to such as "providence."

 

Even tales of the first - 1622 or so - "Thanksgiving" RCT refers to was on a weekday - and thus considered not specifically "religious" as much as secular. OTOH, certainly those who would consider Washington's "providence" to be deity would offer thanks prior to digging into the chow.

 

My main point is that it's functionally impossible for the family farmer not to recognize that regardless of his/her skills, the harvest requires far greater input from the earth/planet itself - and that's beyond calculation by any of us.

 

It's a sigh of relief when the harvest is in, be it grain, hay for livestock, or livestock raised for consumption. Anyone, even a deist, will tend to consider it "providence" that they've made it through another year on the land and living from its produce.

 

OTOH, it's never been a religious holiday such as Christmas or Easter, saints' days, etc., that subsequently have been rather secularized. In fact, it appears to have initially been quite popular even among those who didn't believe, on "Christian" religious grounds, that one should celebrate Christmas and such.

 

m

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Farns...

 

It appears that even in those early days, many early settlers would not have considered themselves Brits in the sense of today, regardless their nation of origin... The so-called "pilgrims" lived a while in the Netherlands and when arriving here... it rapidly became obvious that they were coping with being something other, regardless they were technically "subjects" of the crown in the UK.

 

In fact, that was prior to the act of union of 1707 - and the example of Scotland technically independent regardless of interesting perspectives otherwise. Even then there was a matter of a contretemps at Culloden well after settlers were established in America, and here because they didn't care to be "English." Much of that was due to religious affiliation if not belief - and "America" offered a way to maintain a degree of their home nationality with language, and yet be functionally separate in terms of "oppression" of certain laws in England, Scotland, etc.

 

In short, they were here because they didn't want to be there. Those who began the tradition, btw, were here even prior to the English Civil War... It's my impression that although they certainly recognized certain aspects of the crown, they were "English" by heritage, but already something else by "nationality." Furthering of that perspective ended up with the 1770s contretemps.

 

m

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Never been sure about this.... What are you giving thanks for?

 

What ever it is, I hope you have a good one!

 

i'm giving thanks for a loving wife, 4 loving k9 companions, a swell sister and nephew, a swell neice, a few decent friends, decent health, a decent home, a good job, and the ability to work tonight and tomorrow night at 2.5 x normal pay.(same on Christmas eve & Christmas night)

i'm thankful for my musical instruments and gear, and my mediocre talent that allows me to enjoy them so much.

i'm also thankful for you nutballs here at the Gibson/Epiphone forum......you sure do break up the boredom !!

 

well....you asked!

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Thanksgiving is a great occasion. It is uniquely American in that it is purely secular. It isn't a religious holiday or a day to worship our ancestors, unless you chose to make it one as many of us do. It isn't borrowed from another country or culture. You don't have to belong to a particular religion or ethnic group to take part in Thanksgiving. If you just got off the boat last week, regardless of your native country, language or faith, you have the full right to take part in Thanksgiving because you're an American.

 

For me Thanksgiving is about stopping to acknowledge all that I have. My home, my cars, my little shop, and other material possessions. My friends who have saved me from hell and high water. My goofy dogs. I'm thankful that I live in a place where a high school drop out that is willing to work can get in his car and drive 1000 miles to where the work is and eventually make enough money to live a nice life. In short, I'm thankful for opportunity.

 

But most of all I am thankful for my wife. Without whom I would have nothing, I would be nothing. Every important thing I have ever done in my life has been with her guidance and support. When I fall (and oh how I have fallen) she lifts me up and turns me over.

 

Thank you my love... for all you have given.

 

 

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The point to Thanksgiving is that life for most of us is, by standards of time and place, holding something we might be thankful for, regardless that at times the skies may seem pretty dark.

 

As for various historical factors in North America...

 

We gave the locals smallpox and they gave the Europeans syphilis. Note that this experience gave "us" of a world culture a good reason to consider nowadays a sort of study of the spread of disease not earlier considered. "We" are passing around a lot of diseases today, but prior to germ theory and the means of more specific documentation, certain things would be made into what they may not have been.

 

The U.S. Civil War of the 1770s was rather nasty at a lower level on both sides. Quite nasty in fact. U.S. POWs had death rates of 50 to 70 percent. Some suggest as much as an 80 percent death rate of "American" POWs held by the U.K. at least to 1783. Brit Generals also were frustrated by the fractured policies of colonies' legislatures that differed from that of the Continental Army of Washington. I could go on for quite a while of less than proper by current standards both sides functioned.

 

As for "Indian Wars" of various sorts, given where I live and some family background, let's just say that it was an inevitable battle of cultures that we have documented back to the world's earliest written records. The difference at a certain point was that after the burst of "journalism" in the 1860s Civil War, such stuff was brought far more into question - along with questions of how to best cope with and somehow accommodate conflicting cultures and even concepts of who make up "a people." Heck, it's still an issue.

 

As for the "Indian Casinos," results have varied due to a number of factors, but they seem to have become somewhat stabilized as workable businesses in an appropriate location and with an individually good reputation in their operations. It appears that in many ways they have had "success," and that has led to some improvement in life for many individuals. but you have some ongoing "political" problems involved along the lines of the above difficulty: What is "a people?" It's awfully family and faction oriented where I live, at least.

 

Many factors that led to splitting of tribal groups centuries ago still play a role in "politics" that are as arcane as figuring what made the difference of the Blues and Greens in Constantinople circa 500 C.E. (A.D. is, of course, the old term).

 

m

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