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Gibson 90th anniversary Dove 1985


MartinGibson

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Greetings all,

I came across your forum, and joined figuring maybe one of the acoustic experts here could help me with some info? I recently purchased a 1985 Dove 90th anniversary in tobacco sunburst. Single X braced, seems an almost exact copy of a 1960/61 Dove with ultra fancy lightweight woods and beautiful craftsmanship. I bought it from the original owner who purchased on a whim at Guitar Center and put it in his closet for 28 years, never learning to play it. Laquer has yellowed, but zero checking, cracks, or any marks at all. It had the original rusty strings on it. I changed the strings, and what a guitar! Plays like a Les Paul and sounds just incredible. What I have found out thus far is Gibson did not make many, and that the shop ignored the Norlin executives and built these the old fashioned way before unions destroyed craftsmanship. One person told me Ren Ferguson made many of these. All examples I could research were in cherry sunburst or natural. It does sport the Norlin logo, but is certainly not built like the Norlin years acoustics I have played, which were all a bit light in the tone department and built like dreadnaught battleships from the battle of Jutland. 80085540 is the serial number, 1 11/16th nut width, thin 50's neck binding with 1st fret dot(small).

I had never even heard of a 90th anniversary model before, and is noted with a 90th ann logo on the inside white label. Here is a picture. Came in a strange Martin style plastic case with Norlin logo. Anyone know any info on this model? Sorry about the lousy picture, but you can see the finish color, which seems quite rare.

post-61418-073842100 1385524713_thumb.jpg

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I had an '85 Hummingbird, so same years as yours. Nice sound, but had a neck issue (twisted wood).

 

It was built in Nashville, as yours should be, and it would not have had any involvement from Ren Ferguson since at that time, Ren was not with Gibson yet.

 

1984 was the 90th Anniversary of the 1894 start date for Gibson, so the '85 date just stretched that year a bit, I guess.

 

It's possible that your '85 Dove might have built with the 'sycamore maple' that was bequeathed upon the Bozeman plant a few years later -- it was said to have come from Kalamazoo by way of Nashville. Since the '80s were the decade of big hair electric guitars, acoustic guitars were not produced in great quantities. (Not a bad thing, considering the quality that some guitars achieved back then.)

 

Fred

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I had an '85 Hummingbird, so same years as yours. Nice sound, but had a neck issue (twisted wood).

 

It was built in Nashville, as yours should be, and it would not have had any involvement from Ren Ferguson since at that time, Ren was not with Gibson yet.

 

1984 was the 90th Anniversary of the 1894 start date for Gibson, so the '85 date just stretched that year a bit, I guess.

 

It's possible that your '85 Dove might have built with the 'sycamore maple' that was bequeathed upon the Bozeman plant a few years later -- it was said to have come from Kalamazoo by way of Nashville. Since the '80s were the decade of big hair electric guitars, acoustic guitars were not produced in great quantities. (Not a bad thing, considering the quality that some guitars achieved back then.)

 

Fred

 

Thank you very much, Fred. Maybe I lucked out? The owner lived near the beach, so his closet never got too hot or too cold. The neck on this one is pretty amazing. The owner had actually loosened the strings a step when he put it away. Trouble with these kind of finds is you don't want to be the first to put appreciable wear on it. More of a collector item, so beautiful yet never played like a captive virgin that can't be played lest she lose trade value at the slave market? Interesting situation and decision.....I will probably leave her alone and play my God-like '58 Martin D28 that has been through it all a number of times, and always wins.

Great info. I thank you kindly, sir!

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" Trouble with these kind of finds is you don't want to be the first to put appreciable wear on it" Say what? Unless you strum like Hamel On Trial, it really shouldn't be an issue. It may even bring out the true beauty of this beauty. Nice find! I would enjoy better pictures.

 

Hi,

Being computer stupid I have a hard time trying to reduce the pictures to the required size. However, I did list the guitar on Craigslist and there are good pictures at this address:

 

http://sandiego.craigslist.org/nsd/msg/4207112776.html

 

I listed it at 3300. as I saw a like 84 Hummingbird in new condition fetched 3995. Anyway, price aside, there are some good pictures-especially the figured top wood.

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Not sure anyone has any gold bulliob to swap you.... [tongue]

 

Well, I figured if anyone had any bullion, they might consider trading. The CME controls the price artificially, and it's going down seeking a new low for the year.I see bitcoins hit 1000, and that seems like a ponzi scheme......albeit a trending popular one. Seems value is hard to place on anything, anymore. Perhaps when the head of the snake of corruption is displaced we can return to normal values actually based on something tangible, instead of emotional "feeling" or virtual trends? How about "Bitguitars"? They only exist online, and you don't even get a COA to hold and look at. However...Virtual bitguitars......buy one and get a 26 character unique web viewing portal to see your virtual bitguitar, and you can trade them for other virtual non existent goods such as bitcoins, bitfood, bitmortgages, bitgirls, bitgold, bitpower, bitcars.......all with insane rising values to suck in more buyers for nothing.

We have crawled a long way down the rabbit hole, as Alice would have said.

post-61418-029954300 1385583569_thumb.jpg

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