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My Gibsons All In One Spot


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I never could get the hang of getting great photos of my guitars (how do you guys do that). But since everybody is gone at the moment and it is nice and peaceful, I decided to wrangle the Gibsons currently living with us into one spot and snap a photo.

 

On the bottom - 1946 LG-2 and 1942 J-50 (this is the one that left the factory with a burst to cover up a screw up in the build)

 

Up on top - 1963 B45-12 and 1960 J-200.

 

BurstsandGibsons065_zpscc967a79.jpg

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No real back story behind the J-200. It is the Gibson I have owned the longest. When I got the guitar it had been refinished by Gibson. I do not know if they or somebody else added the second pickguard. There are two cracks under it (repaired) and I don't know if the scratchplate was added to cover them or was what caused them. I came close to trading this off a few times as I am not a fan of the thin neck and my taste in sound has moved away from the J-200s but my wife just loves this guitar and has claimed it as her own. I will say that it is absolutely beautifully built - in every way the pinnacle of the guitar builder's craft.

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Love that little LG. And a '42 J-50 with a J-45's burst? That's got to be some kind of rarity. Way cool.

 

Red 333

 

 

It took JT, a really sharp eyed luthier, and my repair guy to figure this one out. When I got the guitar it had a natural top and was missing the original bridge and pickguard. The top did not appear to have been made with book matched wood so I assumed it was a re-finished J-45. But the FON places the guitar as a J-50. As the story came together the top was book matched. Apparently one of the Kalamzoo Gals did not know how the top was supposed to be put together though and flipped one of the halves. Somewhere down the line somebody noticed the mistake and decided to shoot a burst on the guitar. What is cool is that this batch of J-50s was shipped before the first official J-45s left the factory.

 

This just endears the guitar to me more.

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It took JT, a really sharp eyed luthier, and my repair guy to figure this one out. When I got the guitar it had a natural top and was missing the original bridge and pickguard. The top did not appear to have been made with book matched wood so I assumed it was a re-finished J-45. But the FON places the guitar as a J-50. As the story came together the top was book matched. Apparently one of the Kalamzoo Gals did not know how the top was supposed to be put together though and flipped one of the halves. Somewhere down the line somebody noticed the mistake and decided to shoot a burst on the guitar. What is cool is that this batch of J-50s was shipped before the first official J-45s left the factory.

 

This just endears the guitar to me more.

Gets my vote as one of the world's coolest guitars. If it ever needs a new home, it knows where to look. If i do a second edition to Kalamazoo Gals, I'm gonna want to feature this guitar.

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It took JT, a really sharp eyed luthier, and my repair guy to figure this one out. When I got the guitar it had a natural top and was missing the original bridge and pickguard. The top did not appear to have been made with book matched wood so I assumed it was a re-finished J-45. But the FON places the guitar as a J-50. As the story came together the top was book matched. Apparently one of the Kalamzoo Gals did not know how the top was supposed to be put together though and flipped one of the halves. Somewhere down the line somebody noticed the mistake and decided to shoot a burst on the guitar. What is cool is that this batch of J-50s was shipped before the first official J-45s left the factory.

 

This just endears the guitar to me more.

 

Thanks for explaining the history of the guitar. I wanted to ask, but figured you might have posted it before and I somehow missed it.

 

Red 333

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Nice grouping of Gibsons there Zomby, I would have to say my favorite would be the LG with the J-50 in a close second (I like the story behind it).

 

 

There is a trick to taking pictures of guitars (and other like objects). That would be to turn your flash off and use natural light. Try taking pictures near a window so the reflections of the window play off of your guitar. It helps to have the reflection of some plants or a tree to show off the shiny surface of the guitar. You may have to add another light source if you can't get enough light through a window.

 

A Flash tends to make things look flat with no highlights or shadows.

 

I think you will have some pretty good luck on your next shoot if you follow those simple rules.

 

Bob

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