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Rosemarie

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Hey Guys!

 

I was wondering if anyone has the sheet music (yeah, I'm one of those geeks! :D) or tabs for "Love" by John Lennon and "Woman" by John Lennon?

 

I am not working right now and have no money to get my husband a Christmas gift. In the 22 years we've been together he has *NEVER* seen me play my guitar (my vision went south badly on me when I first met him and I gave up playing). It would stoke him to *NO END* if he could see me play our wedding song ("Woman") and I want to try to learn to sing and play "Love" for him.

 

I know I'm a bit late to the party to pull this stunt, seeing as there is only 12 days before Christmas, but it just came to me as I was listening to those songs on my iPod. I have a lot of time to practice while the hubby is at work so I can assure it will be a surprise. If I get good enough (doubtful), I was even thinking of digging out the camcorder to tape it for posterity.

 

Thanks for any help you guys can provide, I am very grateful for it! :)

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OK, I was going to dig in to start practicing "Woman" only to realize I need a capo --- GRRRRRR! (Every version I have seen and even YouTube tutorials have the song capoed at the first fret!). I have never had a capo in my gear. I know there are barre chords, but my big issue is that I have small fingers (Doggone it! [cursing] ). Trying to figure out an evil plan to pull this off. I know capoes are inexpensive, but this whole plan was hatched because I have no money! Seriously considering seeing if I can borrow money from my dad to order one from Amazon (found a decent one there for $8.00), then praying it arrives in time to give me time to practice!

 

If it weren't for bad luck, I'd have no luck at all! [cursing]

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OK, I was going to dig in to start practicing "Woman" only to realize I need a capo --- GRRRRRR! (Every version I have seen and even YouTube tutorials have the song capoed at the first fret!). I have never had a capo in my gear. I know there are barre chords, but my big issue is that I have small fingers (Doggone it! [cursing] ). Trying to figure out an evil plan to pull this off. I know capoes are inexpensive, but this whole plan was hatched because I have no money! Seriously considering seeing if I can borrow money from my dad to order one from Amazon (found a decent one there for $8.00), then praying it arrives in time to give me time to practice!

 

If it weren't for bad luck, I'd have no luck at all! [cursing]

 

Practice it without the capo for now. When the capo arrives, it's as simple as moving your left hand an inch or so to the right. Will help build the muscle memory at least.

 

-Ryan

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Actually a bit of rubber or equivalent works fine under a common wooden pencil held around the neck with a string or a heavy rubber band. It's easier on the average setup for classical guitar at the first fret.

 

In fact, my first capo, obviously for a classical guitar, was a piece of wood with a string on it that wrapped around the neck and then was tightened and held in place with a "key" not dissimilar to the way violin or flamenco guitar tuning pegs are wood pegs in the wood peghead.

 

I've done that for years if I had a borrowed guitar with no capo...

 

There are variations thereof, too. All you need is something that is roughly the same reverse shape as your fingerboard or has enough springy material to make it so, then a string or rubber band of some sort that can be tethered to hold it tight but not too tight.

 

This may give you an idea of what I'm talking about...

 

http://www.thestringery.com/featured/how-to-make-your-own-capo-the-makeshift-capo/

 

m

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Actually a bit of rubber or equivalent works fine under a common wooden pencil held around the neck with a string or a heavy rubber band. It's easier on the average setup for classical guitar at the first fret.

 

In fact, my first capo, obviously for a classical guitar, was a piece of wood with a string on it that wrapped around the neck and then was tightened and held in place with a "key" not dissimilar to the way violin or flamenco guitar tuning pegs are wood pegs in the wood peghead.

 

I've done that for years if I had a borrowed guitar with no capo...

 

There are variations thereof, too. All you need is something that is roughly the same reverse shape as your fingerboard or has enough springy material to make it so, then a string or rubber band of some sort that can be tethered to hold it tight but not too tight.

 

This may give you an idea of what I'm talking about...

 

http://www.thestring...makeshift-capo/

 

m

 

I've done the pencil and rubber band trick a few times. Works like a charm, but I still prefer the dunlop johnny cash one i bought last month. Whilst we're talking about tricks, I used to stick a pen under my strings near the saddles to give it a twangy sitar sound

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Actually a bit of rubber or equivalent works fine under a common wooden pencil held around the neck with a string or a heavy rubber band. It's easier on the average setup for classical guitar at the first fret.

 

In fact, my first capo, obviously for a classical guitar, was a piece of wood with a string on it that wrapped around the neck and then was tightened and held in place with a "key" not dissimilar to the way violin or flamenco guitar tuning pegs are wood pegs in the wood peghead.

 

I've done that for years if I had a borrowed guitar with no capo...

 

There are variations thereof, too. All you need is something that is roughly the same reverse shape as your fingerboard or has enough springy material to make it so, then a string or rubber band of some sort that can be tethered to hold it tight but not too tight.

 

This may give you an idea of what I'm talking about...

 

http://www.thestringery.com/featured/how-to-make-your-own-capo-the-makeshift-capo/

 

m

 

Thanks, Milo!

 

I did a Google search in my desperation and saw people talking about that, but got scared when the few sites I saw said that it could damage the fretboard and the way my luck runs generally, wasn't sure I wanted to chance it. I'm gonna look at the site you provided and see if I can get up the guts to give it a shot. My dad lent me the money to get one (a Dunlop, found it on Amazon for $8.00) and I'm just waiting on it to arrive. I even found a YouTube video tutorial for playing the song that shows fret positions, strum pattern and chord charts all while playing along to the song - it is to cool for school and will help me a lot. I was trying with just the tabs and couldn't get the chord changes down right and was getting frustrated.

 

Thanks again for the tip for the makeshift capo, maybe reading the site you provided and knowing that some of you have tried it without any disastrous effects will give me the pluck I need to give it a go!

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Love my Shubb.

Well made, firm fit, easy to use.

 

But sounds like you already ordered one?

 

Sorry,, late to the party ..

 

Thanks, Quapman!

 

I did order one tonight, but am still trying to practice so I don't lose any time and can get used to playing without looking down and stretching the muscles in my fingers. No need to develop calouses as I have plenty from quilting! :D

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just use it with out,, all that happens is your down a half step from the original.

 

it just wont sound quite right if your trying to play along with the recording.

 

also you maybe able to find some free tabs for this.

just google "Woman Chord Chart"

 

probably find a whole lotta links..

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Quilting, eh? Do you have one of those huge sewing machine deals? My girlfriend (wife) of the past 6,000 years had one once but around five moves ago we lost enough room for it. Still have lotza patches and even a couple of 19th century family quilts.

 

m

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Quilting, eh? Do you have one of those huge sewing machine deals? My girlfriend (wife) of the past 6,000 years had one once but around five moves ago we lost enough room for it. Still have lotza patches and even a couple of 19th century family quilts.

 

m

 

Nope, all done by hand, sewing machines and I aren't friends. If I want an embroidered block, I search for them online. Here is one of my projects that I did for our Car Club's Show Raffle:

 

P5120290.jpg

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Nope, all done by hand, sewing machines and I aren't friends. If I want an embroidered block, I search for them online. Here is one of my projects that I did for our Car Club's Show Raffle:

 

P5120290.jpg

 

We had pretty cool sewing machines at school which we were taught to use. Other than the standard ones we had ones that you could make custom embroidery with. I think the last thing I made was a hat but I've no idea where that ended up

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Krock...

 

Yeah, funny thing. When I was 12 the kids all were using big bandannas (super-size handkerchiefs) to make parachutes. I wanted a "real" parachute shaped like the old "ice cream cone" design.

 

Asked my mother to make one for me and she said no, but I'll teach you how. Then she told how a friend had been dying of cancer and taught her sons how to cook and sew. I already know how to cook from Boy Scouts. So I made my own parachute. Three years later my own mother was killed in a car wreck.

 

The knowledge of sewing came in handy many times after that, both with quick repairs on the road for clothing and also for sail repair.

 

For what it's worth, Dad remarried and I had a marvelous new Mom for right at 50 some years.

 

m

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Krock...

 

Yeah, funny thing. When I was 12 the kids all were using big bandannas (super-size handkerchiefs) to make parachutes. I wanted a "real" parachute shaped like the old "ice cream cone" design.

 

Asked my mother to make one for me and she said no, but I'll teach you how. Then she told how a friend had been dying of cancer and taught her sons how to cook and sew. I already know how to cook from Boy Scouts. So I made my own parachute. Three years later my own mother was killed in a car wreck.

 

The knowledge of sewing came in handy many times after that, both with quick repairs on the road for clothing and also for sail repair.

 

For what it's worth, Dad remarried and I had a marvelous new Mom for right at 50 some years.

 

m

 

My paternal Grandmother taught me and my sisters how to sew and embroider. I didn't start sewing again until my sister was pregnant with my nephew 9 years ago and I made a baby quilt for him. That was my very first quilt and I taught myself by watching a show on PBS. I also took up needlepoint a couple years ago and made something for my mom for Christmas.

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Little progress report for those who have tried to help me along.

 

First of all, thank you! To be honest, I was a little afraid to even attempt this. I wasn't sure I still had the strength in my fingers to make clear sounding notes and I knew I didn't know as many chords as I used to (or even the versions I used to accommodate my small fingers! I forget who mentioned jguitar.com on here before, but thank you - it has helped me to refresh my memory!

 

I have been trying to break the song down into smaller pieces so I can figure out the chord changes and rhythm. Thanks to the tutorial video I found, it has helped. I hooked up my laptop to my TV so I could see what I was supposed to be doing. I have only accomplished the intro and part of the first verse I wish I could slow down the playback so I could get the chord changes down, that is my main frustration right now. I pretty much practice the full eight hours my husband is at work (unless household chores prevent me!). I think I am only going to be able to play him the intro and first verse for Christmas, the entire song will have to wait for our Anniversary in May because I am a slow learner and I want the little I know to sound as best as I can. I'm a bit disappointed in myself for not being able to learn faster, but I have a lot to catch up on.

 

Thanks again for the support, it means a lot!

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Well, it is Christmas morning here (Merry Christmas, by the way! :D. ) I played the little bit that I learned to this point for my husband. It wasn't perfect, but he recognized it right away. I don't know what made him smile bigger: seeing me play (even badly!) or the fact that I was attempting to play our song. I was so nervous I barely slept last night. I am just happy it surprised him and made him happy!

 

Thank you to everyone for your support and advice along the way (and to Pauloon for the tabs!). I don't think I would have had the courage to do it without the support!

 

Merry Christmas!

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