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Yet Another Chord Question


J.R.M.30!

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I am trying to find the name of a dyad, C and an octave D (no 3rd, no 5th), played at the same time. There is C6/9, C4/9, C7/5, etc. etc. and two power chords played together like a C5 and D5, which would be either a C5/D5 or D5/C5, depending on what dyad is played first from left to right. I find it hard to believe that there isn't a name for this kind of couplet. A Cadd9 (no 3rd, no 5th), a C2, or a C9/5 anyone? [confused]

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Music is context. The two notes, played at the same time, with no context around them, have no name. What key, what is the rest of the group, combo, band, orchestra playing around the two notes you are playing, all that stuff. Much of music is ambiguous at best without context.

 

rct

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Yes it's played with the C and octave D but not on the beat, in between per se.

 

Do you consider that note disposable? If you lost the note, would the passage suffer? In other words, a "passing" note is "passing" mostly because it has a relative lack of tonic strength. But just because it is called "passing" doesn't mean it isn't of importance.

 

So is the E important?

 

rct

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So what is the overall duration of this group of notes? A measure? Half?

 

And finally, what are the instruments? Who is playing the melody? How many others are there? Will you have a bass instrument or few of them?

 

rct

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Not quite sure of the duration, as it has a piano beat, 4/4 time, the melody starts in the middle of the beat 1st and 2nd times but ends on the beat [(the C and octave D transition to the last chord at the end of the progression) (2nd time the C and octave D is omitted going strait to the last chord, presumably at the end of the measure)] , it's not written out in terms of measures. It's mainly on the piano with right hand playing melody, just me no bass part.

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It wouldn't be a chord notation at all, just the proper D above C in the right places on the staff, played simultaneously. Symoltaniusly. Same time.

 

If you expand the instrumentation to include other rhythm instruments it would be really fun to build some great big chords around that D/C along with the accompanying melody, and the two notes would remain just two notes sounded at the same time, but they would be a part of a much larger chord made of other instruments sounding one or two notes at a time. Creates space, distance inside the music, "left/right front/back" for in the recording.

 

Since you are at the piano, ring a giant Gmaj7add9th on top, sustain pedal, then play your notes as you've described here. Should sound pretty good, ehy? So picture that big chord spread across a few instruments, and the bass not playing the root. Kewl.

 

rct

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Yes, it connects the notes F# with the A, which is below middle C and is played with the C and octave D in the lower register.

Well, the F# and A go with the D to make a D major chord (obviously), which has the C as the 7th. Why not call it an oddly inflected D7?

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Well since it's for piano it doesn't necessarily have to have chord symbols but what if it's arranged for guitar? [confused]

 

If it was arranged for guitar is would note the D over C same time. If it was tab it would have it written as two notes on whatever strings it was transcribed as being.

 

Nothing has to have chord symbols. They are a convenience added for faster mastery of a piece by a group. The primary instruments generally play one note at a time, the groups notes all played together constitute the "chord"s. The chords are for the convenience of the chord playing instruments, which in most assemblies are the piano, a guitar, and some form of bass.

 

Yes, I know, the strings can play more than one note at a time, but generally that is not noted as chord names.

 

The orchestra leader may have the piano player roll out some giant chords for the group to hear the sound of the chord they are playing, that's a help. But they can read, they know the key, they will probably get the construct after the first time through, it's their job.

 

rct

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I am trying to find the name of a dyad, C and an octave D...

 

EDIT:

The name of that dyad is C9 or an inverted D7. Even though, technically, a dyad is a chord (if both notes are played together), I think of it more as a double stop or a harmonic interval. It really makes no sense to me to designate that harmonic interval as a chord unless there is more there to define it. I don't like Csus2 or C2 any better. Csus2 also implies a triad, and C2 is actually less accurate and no more revealing than C9 and also suggests a Root, 2 (or 9), 3, 5, and even a 7. Too ambiguous, as has already been stated.

 

I have also seen dyads indicated as chords when chords using three or more notes with the same designation have immediately preceded that dyad.

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Here is a discussion on C2.

 

http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f22/c2-chord-631247/

 

I agree with post 10 - a C2 is simply a C note and a D note played together. It is arguable whether it is a chord at all but "power chords" are accepted now so there isn't any reason why we shouldn't accept it as a "type" of chord even if a little skimpy.

 

Interestingly, the last edition (I think it is version 11) of Band in a Box brought in "2" chords for the first time. Why? Because people wanted them.

 

But as rct says context is everything - in some contexts that note combination on sheet music would be marked as C9.

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I'd have to disagree. Being a piano player I would just see the two notes on the sheet music without any chord IF that was the intent for the piano player to play. You can use M2 but I have never seen that in a jazz chart and that is C with the next D not an octave above. There may be a chord structure to that particular set of notes but there is no technical chord name to a C and D note an octave above. There are exceptions to two note "chords" but they are not standard in a pure music theory sense (the power chord is an example).

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