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What's the most expensive guitar you would take out on the road?


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The thread on Gibson's new "Collector's Choice" Believer Burst at some $13000 to buy brought this question to mind. I know several of you have various Reissue models and others of you have various vintage guitars at your disposal, but do you (or would you ever) give them an airing outside the bedroom /studio?

 

Now I don't play anywhere but in my house but if I were to do so I probably wouldn't hesitate to play my most valuable guitar - my Les Paul 25 / 50 - outside of the house.

 

What do you / would you feel up to playing on the road and what would you always leave (no matter what) at home?

 

Obviously, this question only applies to guitars you own right now.

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I wouldn't risk an expensive guitar on the road. One of my favourite artists Peter Shoulder of from the band The Union plays the cheapest, most battered Les Paul Studio's live, I guess because the threat of it getting stolen must be ever present when the band is on tour.

 

Ian.

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very tough question...

 

I don't own anything most people would consider "valuable". My most expensive two are probably worth in the 8-1000 range.

 

To me they are irreplaceable. I would bring them out with me even though they are my "best".

 

If I had a couple of $3-5000 expensive ones, I don't know if I would bring them out. If I had a couple of that higher value, I know I could get a couple cheaper ones like I have now that play and sound great. Mind you this is my thought at my current income level.....if I were making way better money, I might raise my limit a bit..lol.

 

 

I've seen interviews with some stars who say that vintage ones should be enjoyed and not just left in a case..........I agree with that, but I also think that guitars of historic value are owed a certain degree of respect for the history. These should not be left in a case forever, but perhaps have earned the right to sit in a music room or studio and still get used, but not as "road dogs"..........

 

NHTom

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I will have to take my LP Custom out at some point as I haven't done so yet. I have used more expensive guitars and they're still insured for gigs...but these days almost always my workhorse Japanese Strat and now also a Korean Shine guitar - Gretsch copy with Bigsby - for backup and slide.

I don't do lots now but you have to be ready.

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if i was in a financial position to lay out $13,000 for a guitar, i'd probably also be in a position to replace it if something happened to it. i'm just your garden variety local musician, so unless i hit the powerball, i'll never own a $13,000 guitar. I think BadBluesPlayer really hit on something with his theory of these silly high dollar gibsons, making a 3 to 5 thousand dollar guitar not seem so bad.

My PRS cost a good bit, a bit more than my Les Pauls. I take any or all my guitars to a gig.

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My most expensive geets are my Gibbys.

At $2200 & $1850. And my good ole Hamer which is all banged up but still plays beautifully.

 

I would not hesitate to take them anywhere. I bought them to play them.

They have left the house many times.

 

I have a couple campfire acoustics I take camping or to outdoor parties but only because if they

fell in the fire or had a beer spilled on them I wouldn't care as much.

Plus they play fine and sound fine so I keep them for things like that.

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Well first of all I'd try to estimate the sound differences between the piece of awesome and expensive gear and a cheaper alternative. In other words, will my experience and the audience's experience truly suffer if I bring a reissue LP versus my prized '60 burst? Probably not. Bring the reissue.

 

However, if the answer to the above was yes.... the valuable guitar really makes a noticeable difference... then I think you'd have to define "the road" for me...

 

What are the venues like? Who is taking care of my stuff and how much can I trust them? What are the modes of transport? I'd need to feel good about all of that before I took out a really expensive piece of gear - or one that had immense emotional value to me.

 

Of course I don't own any such gear, so I'm ready to roll at a moment's notice. :rolleyes:

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I only buy what I play and I play all I buy so I take all of them for sure.

On shows and practice I have a Custom Deluxe day sometimes and and a day of Standards other times.

I sometimes mix it up but only take 2 to a show or rehearsal ever.

 

I agree with this. I wouldn't buy a guitar that I wasn't going to play.

 

That being said, when playing out, I would never leave my guitar in the trailor overnight if it were very cold or very hot out and even if the weather was nice I usually transported my guitar in the van/car and kept it indoors if at all possible.

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I only play open-mic nights 'out' - and even those occasions are very few and far between - but I always take my R0. Next time, though, I intend to take my R9 instead just for a change.

Sometimes I even take my M-M 2x12 as well...[scared]

 

lol.

 

P.

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Currently I don't own any guitar that I would hesitate to bring to a gig. None of them are really worth anything, though some of them have a bit of emotional value for me. It comes down to what guitar I need for the gig, and what I feel like bringing.

However on any gig I always keep my guitar with me or in a locked safe place, so even if I later acquire something more expensive I don't think I'd worry about it. Depends of course if the gig is in a place where there's a chance it might get stolen or beaten up by the locals.

 

But if it happens, like I sometimes dream, that I will meet Jimmy Page, become close friends with him, and he'll leave me his #2 Les Paul in his Will, I would not be gigging with that [lol]

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I wouldn't let an airline get ahold of anything I really like.

 

 

I take my guitars on the plane with me all the time..... AA is really great about that as long as your Platinum status.... But I would never check them..... It's cool to watch them go through the Xray..... Cant wait to see what my Custom Lite looks like next month [thumbup]

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From the OP;

 

[wink]

 

P.

 

Oops... Well, while I have nice gear, I wouldn't have a problem playing out with any of it. Nor would I hesitate taking an expensive guitar out for a gig. Probably the hardest thing to replace if it got damaged or stolen would be my 2006 Vegas High Roller. I will make sure my stuff is properly insured (on my homeowners policy) and will watch it like a hawk though.

 

I am planning on a music project this year and am looking forward to getting my gear out of the house and using it the way it was made to be used. Hopefully my feelings don't change after doing so.

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The most expensive gear I own are the upright bass and the new Acoustic 360m amp. Both spend a fair amount of time in my van and get schlepped in and out of venues at least a couple times a month and other places at least four more times a month. Both are big. The bass is delicate. I didn't buy them to look at them, so they get flogged. It helps that trying to steal an upright bass is pretty obvious, and trying to steal the amp is like trying to steal a wheelbarrow full of rocks.

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With me... it's not so much a matter of cost but of the instrument itself.

 

The one in my avatar stays home in the winter. Period. It's over 40 years old and perfect in decent weather but incredibly sensitive to winter even on a theater stage. I don't care to put her through weather she doesn't like.

 

Other than that... I take what's appropriate for a given gig by what's inside my head. Laugh at that if you will, but I'll use an archtop plugged in for a solo "folk blues" or "cowboy" gig where many would take a flattop - and I've taken a flattop out to play a bit of jazz.

 

As for airlines and such... dunno. In the past when I flew quite a bit I'd tend to send heavy photo equipment via FedEx to the hotel or other venue where I planned a shoot - although I'd keep the cameras with me as "carry-on." Once I bought a seat for a last-minute unplanned trip that required my portable studio light rig (and I couldn't find anything as a rental near the location) as opposed to letting folks toss it around.

 

Again though, it ain't so much price tag as care for given equipment.

 

I will admit I'm more cautious about guitars than camera equipment. I'm a believer that in many instances it's more practical and safe to haul a less expensive Epi than anything higher up the retail chain. And in very cold weather, I'd likely not take a full archtop out of the house and would figure which flattop, semi or solid would best fill the gig. Maybe that's just cowardice, but... I've had and seen too many instances of difficulty.

 

m

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The thread on Gibson's new "Collector's Choice" Believer Burst at some $13000 to buy brought this question to mind. I know several of you have various Reissue models and others of you have various vintage guitars at your disposal, but do you (or would you ever) give them an airing outside the bedroom /studio?

 

Now I don't play anywhere but in my house but if I were to do so I probably wouldn't hesitate to play my most valuable guitar - my Les Paul 25 / 50 - outside of the house.

 

What do you / would you feel up to playing on the road and what would you always leave (no matter what) at home?

 

Obviously, this question only applies to guitars you own right now.

If I was still on the road It would be my Rickenbacker 360/12C63 George Harrison model and my Gretsch 6122-1962 Country Gentleman. And I play all by gits every week.

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I take the two most expensive ones with me since there's no substitute for them. Otherwise it would be useless having bought them.

I really couldn't possibly agree more with this rationale.

 

It's times like this that we realise the '+' button had a certain value. Shame it was comandeered.......and I almost typed enough to justify my being awarded a week-long vacation (in the stratosphere).........

 

P.

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Well, for what it's worth, a bit over 40 years ago I bought my now one-and-only solidbody specifically for winter gigs instead of using an archtop that was used during nice weather. Something about -40, F or C, that doesn't treat a hollowbody all that well, even in the back of a Jeep or old-style station wagon.

 

m

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