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Happy Burns Night !


pippy

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Kilt waiting on the dresser; Haggis, Neeps & Tatties at the ready; Drambuie poised for the dessert; Laphroaig anticipating the Deoch an Dorus.

Scots Country Dancing Obligatory; Burns Recitation guaranteed to end in tragedy......two French and four Spaniards? It'll be a Hoot!

 

We're going to have fun tonight!

 

Slainte Mhath, everyone!

 

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P.

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I was with ya on the kilt and haggis,, but after that ya completely lost me and I have no idea what yer talkin aboot..

 

But it sounds like a whole lotta fun.

 

Have yourself a very Happy Burns night and tip a few Drambuie for me as well. :)

 

Enjoy your evening Pip. Sounds awesome.

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Kilt waiting on the dresser; Haggis, Neeps & Tatties at the ready; Drambuie poised for the dessert; Laphroaig anticipating the Deoch an Dorus.

Scots Country Dancing Obligatory; Burns Recitation guaranteed to end in tragedy......two French and four Spaniards? It'll be a Hoot!

 

We're going to have fun tonight!

 

Slainte Mhath, everyone!

 

[thumbup]

 

P.

 

Pippy, ya know I love ya, but I do not have a single clue of what the hell you are talking about. :mellow:

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Thanks for the goodwill, folks!

I didn't think the OP was too opaque but here's an appendix...........[laugh]

 

Neeps = Turnip. In our case we cut them into chunks and roasted them in goose fat with a dozen sprigs of rosemary and a similar quantity of skin-on whole garlic cloves (this brings out the sweetness of the garlic).

Tatties = Potatoes. Traditionally just mashed (but we had a wee bit of cream in ours...).

Drambuie = Whisky-based liqueur - literally translates as 'The Drink which Satisfies'.

Laphroaig = A very peaty Single-Malt Whisky from the Isle of Islay. Not for the faint-hearted...

Deoch an Dorus = Literally 'Drink at the Door' in Gaelic. Sort-of 'One for the Road' except it usually turns into more than one!

 

We did 'To a Haggis', of course, and followed on with 'To a Mouse'. We offered a 'Simultaneous Translation Service' for these two.

After the Dinner was over we had the great narrative poem 'Tam o' Shanter' which, considering the weather we had that night, was rather apt!

 

The Spaniards then entertained us with tales from Cervantes so, all-in-all, a great, great evening and Honours Even!......lol!

 

P.

 

EDIT : For those curious here's a link to the last named Burns poem alongside a version in Plain English. The English doesn't 'scan' properly but that's hardly surprising. Enjoy!

http://www.robertbur...tamoshanter.htm

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Fantastic, sounds like a hoot. What was the French contribution(you mentioned Frenchmen and Spaniards).

 

I went to an Indian restaurant 2 weekends ago to watch the football playoffs (we do things like that here) and the owner bartender offered my wife and I a scotch on the house. We accepted and he served us Lagavulin. I was floored. I love real peaty single malt. We weren't worthy.

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Fantastic, sounds like a hoot. What was the French contribution(you mentioned Frenchmen and Spanards).

 

I went to an Indian restaurant 2 weekends ago to watch the football playoffs (we do things like that here) and the owner bartender offered my wife and I a scotch on the house. We accepted and he served us Lagavulin. I was floored. I love real peaty single malt. We weren't worthy.

 

The "peaty" part of the Scotch description reminds me of an 'ol buddy.....who got so 'down' in life....well, his breathe smelt...... "right"..... 'earthy'...[scared]

Believe ME....."it was a......' REAL PEATY'..... [blink]#-o

 

Rod

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...What was the French contribution(you mentioned Frenchmen and Spanards)?

We celebrated the Galette des Rois festival with some other French and Belgian friends a few weeks ago (our daughter Chloe found la fève in her slice and was crowned Queen for the day) so it was my turn this weekend......

 

...the owner bartender offered my wife and I a scotch on the house. We accepted and he served us Lagavulin. I was floored. I love real peaty single malt. We weren't worthy.

Lagavulin is another of my favourites, Two-Ells! And yes, you were both very worthy of such a noble dram.

 

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P.

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We celebrated the Galette des Rois festival with some other French and Belgian friends a few weeks ago (our daughter Chloe found la fève in her slice and was crowned Queen for the day) so it was my turn this weekend......

 

 

Lagavulin is another of my favourites, Two-Ells! And yes, you were both very worthy of such a noble dram.

 

[thumbup]

 

P.

 

Sounds like an outstanding night! I bet she is queen of many days

 

For some reason, your night brings visions of a Shakespearean drama unfolding with a little armada and Norman invasion thrown in!

 

btw Single malt goes well with Tandoori and Saag Paneer [biggrin] but not so well with the loss of the 49ers [crying]

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Laphroaig forever...

 

A friend, btw, from the land of Oz began his life in Scotland and has more to know and write of its history than most... a onetime printer's devil who ended up retiring after a uni teaching career...

 

Now living in Oz, he keeps me up on such as Burns - and yet how mythology can be too often taken as history.

 

Still love the pipes playing Skye Boat...

 

m

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^

I

I

 

[lol]

 

It begs the question "Do the Greeks celebrate 'Homer Night'?"..............:-k

 

A friend, btw, from the land of Oz began his life in Scotland and has more to know and write of its history than most........he keeps me up on such as Burns - and yet how mythology can be too often taken as history.

 

Still love the pipes playing Skye Boat...

The Scots as a Nation, certainly of my generation, have an occasionally very selective memory - not to say active imagination - as regards their history over the last 750 years or so, m.

We're Celts rather than Saxons and have a more......poetic, shall we say?......approach to our Past Endeavours.

 

And The Skye Boat Song was taught to us at primary school when I was about 8.

I remember our music teacher (Miss Crake) telling us it was different from other songs we had learned so far in that it didn't 'resolve' itself into the major key at the end but remained in the minor.

Even then I understood that this was a very important musical lesson; songs didn't always have to have a 'Happy Ending' as it were.

 

P.

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Yeah, Skye Boat is interesting in ending without resolution - but I'd note that some other pieces of various sorts have a similar ending, perhaps largely to signify a lack of resolution or conclusion. I'm aware of at least one martial arts "form" (kata or poomse) that similarly ends by intent.

 

It's kinda interesting how similar concepts are found in many different cultures.

 

m

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