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Question about my 66 B-25??


Joe W

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Hello, I am new to the forum and enjoy checking out the pics and learning about various Gibson guitars. Anyway, I bought a B-25 10 years or so ago and play it all the time. The question I have is.....there is no b-25 stamp inside the sound hole like other b-25s I have seen. There is only the letter "G" stamped inside towards the neck. My friend says it just means Gibson but I am thinking their might be a more logical answer? I have included a picture next to my 64 C/W. Thanks for your help!

post-62460-039513200 1390691116_thumb.jpg

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Joe - Unless your bridge has been changed, I don't think your B-25 was made in '66. The '66 model had a black plastic reverse-belly bridge. The bridge in your photo is consistent with the '68 or '69 model ('67 had a rosewood reverse-belly bridge).

 

Every '66 B-25 I've seen has been stamped on the center back-strip. That inconsistency would also lead me to believe it is a later model, but I don't have any information on the G stamp.

 

Regardless, they are sweet little guitars. I currently have a '66 Epiphone Cortez, which was Gibson's Epi clone of the B-25 (exactly the same, except for the headstock & pickguard). In the past I've also owned a '65 B-25, and a '64 Epi Cortez.

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Thanks for the quick response. The serial # starts with 700 so the Gibson guide says 66 or 67. It does have the adj. Rosewood bridge. I took it to a Luthier friend of mine after I bought it to get his opinion, confirm it was a b-25.....I heard some prefer to replace the adj. bridge. He advised me not to touch it. He liked the sound and said I should leave the guitar in original condition. Over the years the guitar sounds and plays even better so I am glad I took his advice.

 

Funny, he said the same thing that it was probably made at the end of the day close to Happy Hour!! Oh well, I guess "G" stands for Great Guitar!

 

I am not familiar with the Epiphone Guitars you mentioned so I will check them out. I used to have an older Epi 12-string and the neck broke so I have steered clear of them. I ended up giving it to someone. Now I just wish I had tuned it down a few steps and been a little nicer to it!!

 

Joe

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I agree you should leave it alone Joe, but a few of us have swapped out the adj saddle w/o doing any irreparable harm, with good results. I loved my '67 B-25. Unfortunately, it became a gateway drug for my G.A.S. problems. I replaced it with a '50's LG-2. I replaced that with a '30's L00, for more net financial loss, though I had gotten good deals on all of them at the time. There's a pattern here.

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I agree you should leave it alone Joe, but a few of us have swapped out the adj saddle w/o doing any irreparable harm, with good results. I loved my '67 B-25. Unfortunately, it became a gateway drug for my G.A.S. problems. I replaced it with a '50's LG-2. I replaced that with a '30's L00, for more net financial loss, though I had gotten good deals on all of them at the time. There's a pattern here.

 

 

Funny....I actually sold my 64 C/W to a friend back in 1979 for $350(stupid me...just out of High School...needed $$). He played it for years professionally and swapped out the adj. bridge, added Grover tuners, pick up etc. I saw him again a few years ago and talked him into selling it back to me. It sounds and plays great, but I can tell you I did not pay $350 to get it back!!

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Funny....I actually sold my 64 C/W to a friend back in 1979 for $350(stupid me...just out of High School...needed $$). He played it for years professionally and swapped out the adj. bridge, added Grover tuners, pick up etc. I saw him again a few years ago and talked him into selling it back to me. It sounds and plays great, but I can tell you I did not pay $350 to get it back!!

 

That's a cool story--the guitar finally came back home.

 

Welcome to the Forum.

 

FMA

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  • 2 weeks later...

Those adjustable bridges were a bad idea. The 1958 J-50 in my profile picture had an adjustable bridge till a few decades ago when the adjustable saddle was replaced with a fixed saddle. Perhaps changing the saddle might devalue the guitar to collectors, but it certainly is an improvement to players.

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