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Battle of the gibsons!


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I really cant believe I'm going to admit this but I liked the SG better, the Vee sounded thin to me.Before I heard the video I would have chose the Vee by a mile mostly because I usually dig the ceramic pickups in the Vee the 500t and the 496r.Nothing aginst the SG pickups Gibson puts them in quite a few guitars and they sound good but I think the ceramics sound tighter and better for heavy rock,guess I'm wrong.I do like the fretboard traps better on the SG than the dots on the Vee and the SG being played looked killer with the diamond white pickguard and the thicker white paint.The Vee looked cheeper with the dots and the thin spray job and as I said usally I'd choose the Vee with the ceramic pickups first before the SG but you got me this time I reaally dig the SG for sure this time.What was the price differance?

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There really is no difference that couldn't be dialed out with the amp. The bottom line to me is the neck and the amp.But with the coming of the valve substitutes (Axe fx etc) I think the guitar is almost irrelevant. Choice is Strat (Single)style or Les Paul (humbucker)style.

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It was quite an interesting excercise but I think lashurst's observation is pretty close to the mark.

 

From those two examples I'd choose the AlNiCo over the ceramics but IMX what suits one doesn't suit the other as far as amp settings go.

I usually prefer my '57s but there are times - and songs - when the ceramics are by far the better tool for the job.

I don't want to criticise the concept too much but I don't think the player showcased either instrument in it's best light.

And what would the guitars have sounded like if the p'ups were swapped from the SG to the V and vice versa? That would have been interesting.

 

I know the whole purpose of the comparison is to show how two similar products sound different with the same settings but, IMHO, that's missing the whole point of having tone knobs on your amp.

 

And yes, we only heard the bridge p'up in both cases. Hardly a thorough investigation.

 

But those gripes aside it was still quite interesting.

 

P.

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While I'm probably more of a Flying-V fan aesthetically for my Albert King obsession, getting his tone our of anything is difficult for me. Tone is in the hands after all, an' I ain't got hands that big an' I don't play lefty; upside-down & backward...

 

I also had the privilege of seeing Lonnie Mack up close and personal during a very small club performance back in the early 1990's. I was smitten with the Flying' V then for sure! That boy can play & sing smooth as silk!!! His Memphis drawl was homey & comforting... Good ol' downhome boy...

 

I've certainly been an SG fan as my first rock & roll hero was Robbie Krieger and my favorite band of all time (actually it's a 2-way tie on that designation) is The Allman Bros. I've certainly followed SG players quite a bit and love Dickie Betts & Duane Allman's work on one for sure!

 

I seem to notice the SG sounding darker/richer and this current pickup configuration on the V to be hotter and just a little brighter, maybe less bright and more thin as buliwyf described it here...

 

What were the pickups on an original like Albert King played? I'm pretty sure they weren't 496R/500T's...

 

The newer V's certainly have that hard rock Lenny Kravitz kind of tone/sound...

 

I haven't researched the classic V's of the era well enough to know what pickups came in them, but I'd suggest they aren't as hot as these ones are now, but I could be completely mistaken, I just don't know...

 

Here's a vid of my other favorite band of all time (from that 2-way tie) w/Jeremy Spencer sporting a vintage period/era Flying-V that Danny Kirwan would later use on the Kilnhouse sessions... I believe this was recorded in 1969... (despite the vid caption)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIq_sEbWqMs

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I've owned both guitars (that V and the SG Standard) and didn't care for the pick ups in the V as they're really geared towards a heavy metal sound and just seemed to be ridiculously hot.

 

It did have a really nice neck, though, but I sold it before I got around to changing out the pick ups to something a bit more "traditional" sounding. I was expecting more of a Wishbone Ash sound and instead I got thrash metal!

 

Perhaps a 70s reissue V was really what I was looking for instead of one of the current crop.

 

 

 

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Playing bass over the years, a good number of lead players I backed, used SG's. I like the SG sound a bit more than the V. I thought it had more of a full tone on power chords. For the V, if you were ever at a Mountain concert, and heard Leslie West do the encore, "Mississippi Queen", the V sounds great for that. Overall though, the SG. [thumbup]

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The more distortion and effects you pile on, the less difference can be heard. Youtube's compression doesnt really help matters when evaluating different models. As lashurst said before "There really is no difference that couldn't be dialed out with the amp"

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I guess I'm pretty much into the "don't worry so much about the memory of some sorta tone you'll never duplicate regardless of cash spent, and even if you thought you did, your audience - assuming you have one - couldn't really care half as much as you do.

 

I personally find the SG and some clones to be the only solidbody guitar I've played to date - something over 50 years - that I feel comfortable with. My baby bro (40ish) loves his LP. We're both "right" for what we play and how we play and how our physical geometry works with the instrument.

 

To me, the whole pickin' thing, whether at home to relax or on stage regardless of style, is finding what's most comfortable to play for a given style of music and pickin', and then ensuring that the audience hears clearly and cleanly what it is that the picker/band thinks that they are doing musically. I don't even want to think about the "youth bands" where talented youngsters of all ages spend craploads of money on guitars, amps, etc., but sound horrid overall because they're too busy thinking of tone and power, and too little on what the audience hears.

 

So... get a guitar that helps you play, if you're playing amplified in any way at all, get whatever amplification makes sense for the kinda gig you/your band will play - and then play/sing well together with amplification that allows the entire audience to hear you play well. Anything else, IMHO, is silly and wasteful of good musicians as well as money and good music.

 

m

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