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guitar_randy

Fender Mustang 1 or 2?

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I found a store 20 minutes from me that has all the stangs,version 2's in house that I can go try today as I am off work today. It is a real small shop where I would normally not conduct business but they do have this line of amps so I am going to go try them out for once.THey are a small little place with extremely poor service employees. i won't make purchases from there other than small stuff like picks or cables.I wouldn't trust them were I to have an issue with anything I got from them. THe nearsest store that stocks them is guitar center otherwise which is about an hour drive each way. So if I like one I will either have to make a trip to guitar center or order online with free shioping and wait for it to arrive.

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It was done in a big room. No iso and was fine to my ears.

 

Never had it past 4 on the volume, even live.

 

 

I guess I should also keep in mind that I am used to a halfstack with 4 12" celestions in it so a combo may just take some getting used to there.

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Randy...

 

I think also the pix demonstrates quite well my point earlier.

 

For what I'm doing, the big stacks would be ridiculous.

 

For what he's doing, even my 4-10 '60s Bassman head and cab or maybe even the 120-watt dual 12-inch speaker combo would potentially seem ridiculous.

 

The trick is to get what fits your needs with a given piece of hardware - and to figure if you're answering your needs in the best and most practical manner.

 

E.g., personally I'd prefer spending $10,000 on a PA power outfit with multiple speakers and little guitar amps than a big whomping amp setup. But I'm far more likely to use the former than the latter. Axe likely is in the reverse situation.

 

But I think too often we buy our sound reinforcement equipment by what we think is neat and meets some internal feelings as opposed to what makes sense as a moneymaker or even ego reinforcement.

 

Note that my personal preferences for amps, tube or SS, and variations of amp/PA, always has been for equipment that would support the smallest to a medium venue solo gig, but would work in an ensemble situation too. The Bronco bass amp is the one exception in 50+ years of pickin'.

 

That means I've always looked for something different from a guitar/bass amp featuring raw power/tone. Sometimes I coulda used a bit more raw power, but the bottom line is that I always had what I figured I most likely would use.

 

My "advice" always isn't to get this or that, but rather always to consider what you're doing, what you need in sound reinforcement, and then buying what's most practical for the likely application.

 

m

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Randy...

 

I think also the pix demonstrates quite well my point earlier.

 

For what I'm doing, the big stacks would be ridiculous.

 

For what he's doing, even my 4-10 '60s Bassman head and cab or maybe even the 120-watt dual 12-inch speaker combo would potentially seem ridiculous.

 

The trick is to get what fits your needs with a given piece of hardware - and to figure if you're answering your needs in the best and most practical manner.

 

E.g., personally I'd prefer spending $10,000 on a PA power outfit with multiple speakers and little guitar amps than a big whomping amp setup. But I'm far more likely to use the former than the latter. Axe likely is in the reverse situation.

 

But I think too often we buy our sound reinforcement equipment by what we think is neat and meets some internal feelings as opposed to what makes sense as a moneymaker or even ego reinforcement.

 

Note that my personal preferences for amps, tube or SS, and variations of amp/PA, always has been for equipment that would support the smallest to a medium venue solo gig, but would work in an ensemble situation too. The Bronco bass amp is the one exception in 50+ years of pickin'.

 

That means I've always looked for something different from a guitar/bass amp featuring raw power/tone. Sometimes I coulda used a bit more raw power, but the bottom line is that I always had what I figured I most likely would use.

 

My "advice" always isn't to get this or that, but rather always to consider what you're doing, what you need in sound reinforcement, and then buying what's most practical for the likely application.

 

m

 

 

 

 

Yea,I get ya. And I am juggling 2 things. THey are what you describe and I also have this allowable sound in my head of what I like,don't like and can work with. So its has to be pleasing to my ears or I just won't be happy with it and it will collect dust. I have tried some modeling stuff in the past and found it too digital sounding and not authentic. I realize it will never be just like the real deal and it is what it is, modeling, but if its too far off and doesn;t have useable tone,I won't be content with it. I have a digitech rp 50 or 100,can't even recall off hand which one but it just sounds so digital and synthetic that I can't hardly find anything on it useable to me,or I am just a total old school mentality dumb arse that can't figure out the proper way to adjut it. But I kinda think its the sound of the unit itself. So knowing I am particular with tones and there are alot of modeling sounds that just sound like dung to me ,I am trying to find something that will work for me,if its possible in the modeling technology world. THis mustang has gotten high regards from many different walks of life in the music world so I am focusing on that and if it will work for me at the moment. I should know more when I try em out today. When it comes to size ,I want to go o the 100 wat model in case it ends up being useable enough to actually jam with others with or gig with ,but my most important thing I am using to decide which model is the sound. If one sounds to me better than the next due to speaker size, or any other variable,I probably will lean that way.

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I'd see no reason against the 100-watter.

 

In fact, it's the one I'd most likely buy. I have more tube power, and I have less SS power, all of which answer one or more needs I have now. The 100 would offer a lotta flexibility in venues without breaking an old man's back.

 

I would suggest, though, that you ease up inside your head on the sound/tone thing. I'm not saying that it's unimportant, but what I am saying is that most audiences, whether live or in various sorts of recordings, ain't gonna hear what it is you think you're producing. That's a fact faced by the ancient Greeks and Romans who actually did some sound reinforcement (see Vetruvius), and by everybody nowadays whether using all acoustic or various sound reinforcement.

 

More... I've got three things up on Youtube from a cupla years ago - maybe should do something else some day - all with the same guitar, same amp, same settings, same basic technique, and I hear significantly different "tone" simply because I'm playing at different spots on the strings. And... IMHO, none sound like what I thought I was hearing from behind me when I sat down to push the record button on the computer software. What's more, you ain't gonna hear on any of your setups what I think I hear on any of mine.

 

I guess that's why I personally stress playability of instruments and thoughtful consideration of appropriateness of sound reinforcement equipment. That's not to say that I'd go with this or that if suddenly some big road band said, "Gee, come play with us for the next year," unlikely as that may be for me at my age. But... if "looking like a wild big rock picker on stage" were what paid the bills, guess what I'd go for? <grin> Even if it were plastic mockups just for looks with the real sound going from a Deluxe Reverb miked through the board...

 

m

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So between the mustang 1,2 and 3,the only one which has an enclosed back cabinet is stang 1? I tried the mustang 1,2,and 3 tonight and out of the 3 only the stang 1 had the enclosed back. I know when I look at guitar center website at the stang 2 it shows photo of it with an enclosed back. I asked the sales guy there what the deal was ,that I thought the 1 and 2 had enclosed backs. I asked if there is an option to get it either way or if they all come open back, He said ,no,they all are open back cabinets. So is the photo messed up or deceiving at guitar center website or why is this contradicting info here?

 

Other than that,they had ok sound but were more difficult to me to adjust ,at least without practice and trial and error time involved. I could not see gigging with this type of complicated set up where you could so easily lose your settting and not find it again or bump it to a different setting. Be ok for at home use though. Still undecided which one now as they didn't sound any different at low volume which I had it. Didn't seem like they had alot of power but I wasn't able to turn it up . ALot of people in the tiny store feet from me and I wasn't about to be like one of those juveniles with no manners or respect for those around me.The place is just too small and no space to crank it in that store.

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i have a Mustang III V2, and the trick is the 3 quick-access settings (you provide) and saving other settings to your needs out of the 80 you get with it, and the 20 blank ones (because totally there is 100 can be presets).

I also have a Vox Valvetronic 60 watts but at jams (and not that big of place) it was just loud enough but not for leads, persay, well, other guitar players sometimes to me play too loud.

 

I should have got the Vox Valvetronic 120 watt one, and well, maybe the Mustang is more flexible for effects but the Vox sounds more tube type in the way that it is built.

 

The amp simulators are different though, and with the Fender, you get well more Fender type amps, but not all of them by any means, while the Vox is just a more generic type different simulated amps.

 

The 100 watts Mustang III V2 can be on 1 and played for home practice or even 2 or 3 perhaps. I fail to see nowadays why a tube amp has to be loud to get a tone out of it. These amps can be played at about any volume and get the about same tone, and the Vox I think is better on that, loud or soft. The Fender in that aspect I guess is okay also, but it is different.

 

Anyway with the Fender you start with a preset- you like- adjust a little if you want and can just Save it on the same preset number or on another preset number as well as three of them for quick acess, but the foot pedals make the (especially the 4 button foot pedal)( I think you get the 2 button only with it) difference, and with the 4 button foot pedal you have about 3 Modes on the pedal, so the quick-access presets you had can be accessed by the other 3 buttons out of the 4, or about 3 different modes do different things via use of the 4 button pedal. The 2 button is not as flexible, and the Vox has a foot pedal also for accessing different stored settings that you make.

 

With a tube amp, sorry to say, you have about 1 sound (without changing things) and with the modeling amps you can have other settings at the press of a button or pedal button.

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Other than that,they had ok sound but were more difficult to me to adjust ,at least without practice and trial and error time involved. I could not see gigging with this type of complicated set up where you could so easily lose your settting and not find it again or bump it to a different setting. Be ok for at home use though. Still undecided which one now as they didn't sound any different at low volume which I had it. Didn't seem like they had alot of power but I wasn't able to turn it up . ALot of people in the tiny store feet from me and I wasn't about to be like one of those juveniles with no manners or respect for those around me.The place is just too small and no space to crank it in that store.

 

I knew this would be the outcome.

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I'll agree that the amps can be "fun" to get dialed in.

 

One point on using a smaller amp, though, you'll hear something quite different IMHO if you raise it to chest level, as on a bar stool or equivalent.

 

m

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Well, if you are going to go crazy adjusting an amp and pressing "save" a couple of times to save the preset sound you made or liked, then I suppose you will do that.

I guess you never want to play a synthesizer then, because the manual for the one I have is not like 6 pages or so, but 248 pages of manual.

And that is explaining what those amps or synths are and how they work, well the guitar amp doesn't get into that much detail.

???

 

Join the new world.

[scared]

 

no really,

[rolleyes]

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I could not see gigging with this type of complicated set up where you could so easily lose your settting and not find it again or bump it to a different setting.

I just don't think you gave em a chance man. These amps are VERY easy to use, and there is no possible way you can BUMP a dial and loose a setting, (as long as you press SAVE if you have made a new preset or changed an existing one)

 

If you go with the MIII or above you can use a 4 and 2 button foot switch, offering infinite control over your quick access presets, as well as program/bank up and down, stomp box/delay/modulation on off control, tap-tempo for the delay, even a built in tuner. IMO Fender's goal seemed to be EXACTLY tuned toward the working guy. They got these right IMHO

 

Understood that we're all at the start comfortable with the standard rigs, but a few hours to get used to it is all that it would take.

 

I still have my tube amps, with no plans to replace them. But the mustangs are easy to move, easy to program the presets you want/need, a breeze to control on the fly, and they DESTROY any modeling amp that's out there today.

 

Listen no one is trying to change your mind, you are entitled to your own opine. A few of us here, have a lot of experience with them, there's no right or wrong answer I suppose.. and for sure, they are not for "everyone", but from some of your conclusions it just seems needed some more time to sort it out.

 

/Ray

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Well, if you are going to go crazy adjusting an amp and pressing "save" a couple of times to save the preset sound you made or liked, then I suppose you will do that.

I guess you never want to play a synthesizer then, because the manual for the one I have is not like 6 pages or so, but 248 pages of manual.

And that is explaining what those amps or synths are and how they work, well the guitar amp doesn't get into that much detail.

???

 

Join the new world.

[scared]

 

no really,

[rolleyes]

 

 

Some people don't have much patience and for all that presets and programming and whatever else is all involved with computer amps. We just like to play. I ain't gone and give up yet but I don't find much enjoyment spending a lot of time adjusting an amp. I just like to play it. If its overly complicated ,its not for me. I guess the technology is in a constant advancement so maybe it will keep improving. But even though modeling stuff is getting better and better sounding,it still sounds like modeling stuff no matter how much time is spent tweaking on it. I am sure the main parts on the mustang amp isn't something that couldn't be figured out if I would have it in my house where I would sit and mess with it for a while ,but new to it and trying to dial stuff in at a guitar store gets overwhelming some. I was trying 3 mustang amps out for an hour and I still only could do very minimal adjusting anything to where I sort of knew what I was doing.

 

oNl the other hand ,I might purchase a modeling amp and totally hate it because more time is spent dialing it in then playing it, don't really know yet I guess. That's the road I am on right now and going down. At this point,who knows how things will go. I guess we'll see. I'm not going to fell pressured to need to change to modeling technology though if I decide I don't care for it. We'll see I guess.

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I could not see gigging with this type of complicated set up where you could so easily lose your settting and not find it again or bump it to a different setting.

I just don't think you gave em a chance man. These amps are VERY easy to use, and there is no possible way you can BUMP a dial and loose a setting, (as long as you press SAVE if you have made a new preset or changed an existing one)

 

If you go with the MIII or above you can use a 4 and 2 button foot switch, offering infinite control over your quick access presets, as well as program/bank up and down, stomp box/delay/modulation on off control, tap-tempo for the delay, even a built in tuner. IMO Fender's goal seemed to be EXACTLY tuned toward the working guy. They got these right IMHO

 

Understood that we're all at the start comfortable with the standard rigs, but a few hours to get used to it is all that it would take.

 

I still have my tube amps, with no plans to replace them. But the mustangs are easy to move, easy to program the presets you want/need, a breeze to control on the fly, and they DESTROY any modeling amp that's out there today.

 

Listen no one is trying to change your mind, you are entitled to your own opine. A few of us here, have a lot of experience with them, there's no right or wrong answer I suppose.. and for sure, they are not for "everyone", but from some of your conclusions it just seems needed some more time to sort it out.

 

/Ray

 

 

I still am giving it a chance. Not for gigging but for playing with at home,recording and stuff. Yea,your right,I am just in the sorting out phase. My mind isn't really set on what I am going to get. I already have amps right now. I am not starting out fresh,just adding to my armory. This will not be my main amp. It will just be another one.

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I knew this would be the outcome.

 

The journey is not over yet. I am still not a whole lot closer at figuring out what I am going to do with this purchase.Rome wasn't built in a day as some say. I guess if were built by me there might be a tent erected by now.

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The journey is not over yet. I am still not a whole lot closer at figuring out what I am going to do with this purchase.Rome wasn't built in a day as some say. I guess if were built by me there might be a tent erected by now.

 

My suggestion: get a Mustang 3, version 2 (the version 1 amps have an annoying "fizz" sound that has supposedly been fixed with version 2) . Also, get the 2 and 4 button switches, and the expression pedal as well. There are 2 xlr outputs on the back of the amp (Mustang 3, version 2). I hooked up 2 Hiwatt Bulldog 18 amps to my Mustang 3, v2 (using 2 xlr adapters/cables) loud, as well as soft, sounds great. The Mustang 3, v2 also has a effects loop in out/send receive and another switch to reduce feedback. Check it out. I'm glad I did. msp_thumbup.gif

I also have a Mustang 2, v1 (obtained when first available) a GDEC 3-30, a Mustang Mini (makes a good external speaker for this laptop) and a Passport mini (for "busking" at the local park). I like the GDEC the best of all of them, but the Mustang 3, v2 is also very versatile if you use the controlling "FUSE" software and "deep editing". Don't forget to update the firmware and the "FUSE" software as soon as you connect it to your computer/internet. And, check out the Fender web site for additional downloads (presets and backing tracks) as well as "tips" and other pertinent information relative to these amps.

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about that "fizz" - that's a good thing to mention, however not all the MIII V1 amps had the problem, but a lot of them did. Mine (V1 MIII) does not have it, -- I've run all the tests to see, it's just not there. I would probably offer the same advice tho (go with the V2, can you even FIND V1s?)

 

I do like the MIII for it's ease to move, but the MIV is a beast! When Sweetwater was blowing them out at $299 this fall, I had to jump.

 

and of course we've not really discussed FUSE, have we?? hooking up with a PC Via USB.. a pretty nice way to manage and set presets.

 

 

Anyway, I digress, Randy good luck, if you have any questions, feel free to PM me.

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One last question on this mustang amp. How well does it do metal tones. I don't play that stuff no wheres as much as the classic rock or blues stuff but if I get a modeling amp I kinda would like it to give me the options there too. I know peavey vypyr videos demonstrate a lot of metal tones but not finding much on the stang for that. Ones I do find seem to be all the same metal tone. Is this amp pretty limited with metal tones or anyone know a good video which demonstrates whatit can do there?

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I suppose you can get up utube and put Fender Mustang III V2 in the search bar, and I suppose there are videos.

 

 

http://support.fender.com/manuals/guitar_amplifiers/MustangI-V_%28v.2%29_advanced_manual_revA_English.pdf

 

2. Turn the DATA WHEEL to select one of 17 amplifier models:

AMP MODELS

Studio Preamp

'57 Champ

'57 Deluxe

'57 Twin

'59 Bassman

'65 Princeton

'65 Deluxe Reverb

'65 Twin Reverb

'60s Thrift

British Watts

British '60s

British '70s

British '80s

British Colour

Super-Sonic (Burn)

American '90s

Metal 2000

3. Press EXIT to return to Play mode

 

 

I have heard that Pevey amp is more tuned for metal, but then I really do not know what it has in it. I suppose there are videos on those also somewhere on utube.

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I don't have time to watch these videos all the way through. Plus I own the amp so why do I have to watch a bad shaky video.

 

The first one sort of has something around the 7:20 mark, but is useful for explaining the amp and foot pedals.

 

The second one I do not know for sure just went by the Name.

 

If you want to watch them on utube, then just click on top where the name of the video is, and you will get up that video on the utube page.

 

 

 

 

??????

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I don't have time to watch these videos all the way through. Plus I own the amp so why do I have to watch a bad shaky video.

 

The first one sort of has something around the 7:20 mark, but is useful for explaining the amp and foot pedals.

 

The second one I do not know for sure just went by the Name.

 

If you want to watch them on utube, then just click on top where the name of the video is, and you will get up that video on the utube page.

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56agzsH9jo0

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPqwdS6s8fo

 

??????

 

Man,its a brain yanker. The fender seems ok for the mellow stuff but kinda falls short the metal area. The Peavey plows the fender over in the metal area and not sure how it is with the mellow stuff as just like there is not much out there for metal on the stang there is not much out there for mellow stuff with the peavey in you tube land. So far nothing is really jumping at me like its a must have or a great amp.

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