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Pure sound of electric


Valeriy

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Hey guys, I continue my quest in an electric guitar sound and, as a matter of fact, I have a question B) .

 

Do you always play on your guitar together with a guitar effects (processor, distortion, overdrive, chorus, flanger…)?

I.e., Do you sometime play on a pure sound of your electric guitars? How often? I read somewhere, if to play on the pure sound then rather single-coil guitars are more suitable to this.

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I play my electric guitars unplugged most of the time!

 

When I do plug in then it depends on which amp I use. My little Bugera is normally linked to an overdrive unit and wah pedal whereas my Mesa Maverick tends to get used just as a straight amp (albeit via a Dr Z Airbrake) with nothing else other than the amp's own (excellent) reverb.

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Hey guys, I continue my quest in an electric guitar sound and, as a matter of fact, I have a question B) .

 

Do you always play on your guitar together with a guitar effects (processor, distortion, overdrive, chorus, flanger…)?

I.e., Do you sometime play on a pure sound of your electric guitars? How often? I read somewhere, if to play on the pure sound then rather single-coil guitars are more suitable to this.

When practicing or developing song arrangements, I play all of my guitars straightly amped up through full-range speaker systems or headphones. "Straightly amped up" stands for absolutely pure, i. e. without EQ, compressor, distortion, delay, and modulated effects like chorus/vibrato, flanger, phaser, tremolo, rotary cabinet simulation, and in most cases reverb.

 

Single coil, humbucker, and piezo pickups all put out awesome sounds. Perhaps you might associate these pure tonal characteristics with jazz or country music in the first place, but I have to say that my axes can rock this way, too. I also found it to be the very best way of enhancing my playing technique.

 

Sometimes I add a slow chorus in "undermodulated" operation, i. e. FX signal level setting significantly lower than that of the dry signal. When listening through headphones, I like a short ambience reverb, too.

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Depends on the amp. Most people would agree that plugging in directly with a short, high quality cord is the best sound the amp can produce on its own (less capacitance I believe). However you are then limited to the sound(s) the amp itself can create. Also many vintage (or vintage style) tube amps have no master volume. Since this is true of many of my own amps I almost use a booster pedal.

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Valeriy.....

I have a multi effects pedal but in total use it only maybe 3 weeks an entire year.

 

I normally use a tube amp that has built in spring reverb.....I use the reverb lightly and only wind the preamp volume (mine has vol./master controls) just past the breakup point.

 

this is pretty much the case with me . if i'm just playing for my own pleasure, it's just as Bender has described. if i'm playing a gig, then depending on what the song calls for, i might add a little bit of delay, occasional wah wah. once in awhile a vibe pedal. as far as the single coil vs humbucker, it's all in what your ear wants to hear.

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I really enjoy the sound of my LP with P90s straight into my Fender Super 60 combo, clean with a smidge of reverb. Same with my Tele, just an honest straight guitar tone. I love my effects too....and even playing unplugged...

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Thank you. I began to understand, yep, indeed, useful remark of Surfpup , at a pure sound (especially when a guitar with passive pickups) it is necessary to consider features of the amplifier and even the length of the guitar cord so that it was as short as possible to keep nuances of the pure electric guitar.

 

About reverb (or a bit delay), yep, it needless to say is often necessary for any instrument. It after all not distortions, and only an effect of a hall. And I often like to use a reverb effect. For example, just practicing, I accidentally recorded an interesting guitar solo (IMO [rolleyes] ) thanks to my reverb device plugged in this time:

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When I was gigging as a rhythm guitarist I always just played through my amp (Dual Rectifier) with no effects. There's just something great about a Les Paul played thru a nice loud tube amp. No reason to muck it up with effects.

 

Now I just play in my home and have purchased MXR Chorus and Phaser pedals that I like to add when i'm attempting to solo or play lead. I'm still looking for a nice (cheap) reverb/delay pedal to add as well.

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To me there is no better sound (at home) than hearing my SG Custom pluged straight into my 74 Fender Super Reverb with the volume set to 7 with a generous amount of reverb and the occasional use of the trem. Once and a while I throw the cry baby into the mix for fun but usually I run her straight into the amp nice and loud.

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Another nod here for the straight in tube amp with spring reverb.

I don't gig so I don't need to reproduce sounds so much.

 

I'm 52 but my kids are young and I'm too busy with them to commit to rehearsing twice a week.

Maybe when they are older and moved out.... if I can still dress myself by then that is.....

 

But hey,, I do have a gig today with them...lol.

My daughters piano recital is today and I am accompanying the kids on a song in it..lol

Acoustic though... J-45 will get to go out today woohoo!

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I try for the best tone, between guitar and amp alone. First of foremost!

I do use "effects" pedals, sparingly, for just those particular effects,

but never to get "my tone." But then, I grew up in a time, when effects

pedals were rare, and limited to "fuzz/overdrive" and Wah-wah," for the

most part. And, I had them (Vox Tone Bender, and Wah-wah), back then,

as well! [biggrin] But, again, just for what they did. "Old School" as

that might seem/be! [tongue]:rolleyes:[biggrin]

 

CB

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Almost always plugged in with electric, most of the time a clean setting, some reverb into a tube amp.

 

If I'm using one of mu mustang amps, I will add slight amount of a quick delay, and may some compression.

 

I'm not a fan of a lot modulation, so that's only used when called for.

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I often always record sample tracks and song ideas/arrangements direct in using only a fuzz pedal if the sound calls for distortion. I'd say 80% of the guitar tracks are straight signal into the software/computer and 20% is fuzz rhythm and lead. I do find that there is a much different tone that really brings out the natural sound of the guitars electronics. Some amps, including the ones I play have a very coloring effect on the tone of the guitar. This could be a good and a bad thing, it really depends on how you look at it and embrace it. That video of Gilmore is pretty cool!

 

When recording with a band I tend to mic the speaker cabinet with several microphones in different positions to get a few different signals that I can blend and mix as one track. Sometimes I will record direct from guitar into the software/computer, but mainly it's mic'd and recorded live. It really depends on the vibe and sound needed.

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I don't have any FX pedals therefore, for me, it's Guitar + Amp. Always. That's how I like it.

My amp (1978 Music Man 2x12 combo) has a reverb tank (if I want it) and a truly wonderful sound so, for me, added to my R0 that's the perfect set-up.

 

Bear in mind, however (and as I've said on the same subject before), I'm NOT a Professional musician. I'm sure a Pro would find many boxes very useful indeed.

In fact to play many songs they will be essential.

 

But I love the 'Pure Sound of Electric' as you put it (which means the sound of the guitar + the sound of the amp!) before anything else.

 

P.

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I tend to go straight in to the amp.....been lucky to find several guitar/amp combos that "work" for me.

 

I have a few effects, but use them/set them to give a little enhancement to my core "sound".....some subtle reverb, a boost/drive just to lift it for leads, eq, and maybe a little wah if the song calls for it........

 

 

I think part of my mindset on this comes from crewing for several bands. The guys with the elaborate mega setups seemed to have to always mess with them. What sounded killer in the rehearsal hall didn't necessarily adapt to the room where the gig was or the studio they were recording in.......the simpler guys who pretty much had guitar/amp/volume/tone could always quickly and easily find a sound that worked.

 

NHTom

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First, I do not believe that one can have a "pure sound of electric guitar."

 

Why?

 

Let us consider other instruments. I can not make a fine violin sound like a fine violin. Segovia called the classical guitar an "orchestra" because a single guitar can make so many differences in tone - even in one piece of music when played by a skilled technician.

 

An electric guitar is an instrument of two pieces: The guitar itself with its electrical pickups and the amplifier.

 

If a classical guitar may make many different types of sound simply through player technique, consider on an electric the placement of pickups vs. strings and the settings of volume and tone.

 

On all steel string guitars, especially, many types of strings also will bring a different sound unamplified. So... consider the difference when the different kinds of string work with different pickup "setup."

 

The closest one may come on an electric guitar to "pure" guitar sound? To me, it would be to put one's ear to the guitar, whether solidbody or hollow archtop or even AE flattop, and listen. Then try to match that sound from an amplifier.

 

NH Tom also has a very good point. I would add that every venue and the placement of amplifiers also will make a difference on what an audience hears. Simple to me is better, but with consideration to what an audience hears.

 

To me the "stomp box" is fine if you want the guitar to sound like some other instrument. The old "fuzz boxes" were, in their time, designed to sound like "dirty" saxophone sounds of jazz and early rock. These things have a time and place for when you do not want to sound like a guitar. I use a "Leslie" rotary speaker "box" when I want my guitar to sound like a Hammond B3 organ.

 

m

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In my opinion, this is not about pure guitar tone or better string tone via magnetic pickups which is impossible on principal. Pure string tone will call for transducing longitudinal vibrations as provided at the bridge, containing the entire sound spectrum. In opposition, magnetics will always put out transversal vibrations in a certain area, emphasizing certain frequencies, cancelling out others, and the rest being in between.

 

As for "pure electric" tone, magnetic pickups sound nice to me when there's just a volume control and a full range system, nothing else. When wanting "pure string" sound, I use piezo bridge solidbodies, applying the same way of amplification, just volume control, a full range system and nothing else.

 

I found out that all these guitar sounds are great and useful for real music applications. Straight amplifying of magnetic pickup signals may be not very common, but I like it as well as piezo tones.

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Cap...

 

What you suggest is how magnetic pickups were first used on many acoustic guitars - and still can be.

 

My 12-string flattop has a magnetic pickup - no controls. It sounds very nice through several amplifiers, but it can be "muddy" with the incorrect amplifier settings.

 

In the early 1960s I used several magnetic pickups on flattop and archtop guitars. Some had volume, or tone and volume controls. Some did not, and plugged directly to an amplifier.

 

m

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"Pure" tone, these days?! LOL!!! Whatever "pure" means, anyway? [tongue]

To me, it's just about that guitar and amp tone, that's most pleasing

to the player, and hopefully, those listening, too. One can argue or ponder

"Pure" tone, forever. It's meaningless (IMHO) beyond what you really want

to hear, except in a "scientific" application. Some love the tone of a

Gretsch, in a Vox AC-30, 50, or 100. Or, a Ric (6 or 12 string) through the

same Vox setup, or a Fender Dual Showman, or a Roland Chorus amp. Still other's

love a Gibson and (Cranked) Marshall Plexi tone, or through a fully satruated

and distorted beyond all recognition, High Gain Amp (Marshall, Hiwatt, Orange,

Soldano, etc., etc., etc.).

 

Whatever works! [thumbup] Chasing "that tone," is endless, as we adapt to,

and get bored with, even the best tones, at times. And so, go looking for

something "better!" :rolleyes:[biggrin]

 

CB

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"Pure" tone, these days?! LOL!!! Whatever "pure" means, anyway? [tongue]

To me, it's just about that guitar and amp tone, that's most pleasing

to the player, and hopefully, those listening, too. One can argue or ponder

"Pure" tone, forever. It's meaningless (IMHO) beyond what you really want

to hear, except in a "scientific" application. Some love the tone of a

Gretsch, in a Vox AC-30, 50, or 100. Or, a Ric (6 or 12 string) through the

same Vox setup, or a Fender Dual Showman, or a Roland Chorus amp. Still other's

love a Gibson and (Cranked) Marshall Plexi tone, or through a fully satruated

and distorted beyond all recognition, High Gain Amp (Marshall, Hiwatt, Orange,

Soldano, etc., etc., etc.).

 

Whatever works! [thumbup] Chasing "that tone," is endless, as we adapt to,

and get bored with, even the best tones, at times. And so, go looking for

something "better!" :rolleyes:[biggrin]

 

CB

 

Well Put!

 

This is why I've fallen to the "Plug in, crank it up, hit a nice big open A chord, and if I get goose bumps, It's good for me" category.

 

NHTom

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