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Texasbluezman

NUTS!


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I should of came here for knowledge and opinions. I pulled a full step bend at the 2nd fret on the G string and the string popped out of the nut. Later inspection showed me that it chipped the nut and would not go back in the slot correctly. I did a little research and opted for the Earvana nut. After installing, I was intonating for an hour before I decided to put it back in the case and try again later. Tried it again for 30 mins. the next day and still could get it. The guitar is intonated correctly, but chords are definitely out of tune. After further researching, (on this forum) I should have got a bone or brass nut. Would do you recommend? I mainly play blues and blues/rock, but also some hard rock and metal when I get in the mood, but I usually change guitars for that.

 

BONE OR BRASS?

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it would sound like the nut slots are not regulated (cut to the proper depth) for your string gauge and setup.

 

I've been doing this for ever, and for stuff like this, I take it to someone who knows what they are doing..

 

Good luck..

 

so anyway for me it's either tusq or bone.

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Bone because 1-if cut well it stays in tune very well, just as good as the man made stuff. 2-it *can* sound better than most materials. You're going to get a hoard of people telling you bone or any material makes no difference once the string is fretted because the vibrating string length is from the fret you've chosen to the bridge. Not true. It IS true that it might make little or no difference, but if it does (which depends on several factors) it can be subtle or quite obvious. I've been making them for decades so I've see a lot of results from nothing to wow. At it's best it will deepen the tone in a great way. Of the last 2 i did one happened to be probably the biggest improvement i have ever seen. really woke this strat up like i've never seen before. The other ...zero difference, at least that i could detect.

 

I'm a big believer in bone. I've tried the rest and some aren't bad, but many do hurt the tone in some way. Worse i ever experienced was slipstone. Absolutely killed the guitar's sound and i couldn't rip that thing out and throw it away fast enough. But all this said, note that if not made well, the material you choose no matter how good can ruin your sound and tuning. Make sure whoever does it is good at his craft and cares about his work and pay whatever you have to. It's worth it to be sure it's done right. Or learn to do it yourself which is the best way, tho you may screw up a lot first.

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Bone is harder than the others, stable, easily worked and cheap. Honestly, I do not believe there is that much tonal improvement with a different nut material in other than open strings, but I still have bone nuts on many of my guitars...and MOST higher priced guitars use bone nuts, so...

 

Also, I do buy pre cut nuts and hand fit them to each guitar myself...took me a few to get it right, but you can always go back and do it again, provided you don't take off too much.

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most of mine are corian w/the remainder being Tusq or a generic equivalent from the respective factorys, I have access to very inexpensive teflon barstock and literally a lifetime supply of Teflon grease (American Scientific Products brand).

of 20+ guitars i've only ever needed to replace the nut on 1 for which I used Tusq.

never had or tried bone, nothing against it, just never came up....

I always "check & dress" factory nuts on the initial post purchase string-change, which helps greatly to prevent problems.

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Installing a nut takes a lot of experience. It's easy to get it messed up like it is now. Whatever you use, the important thing is to get it installed my somebody who knows what they're doing and can install it right the first time. Gibson tends to know what they're doing. They use a Corian or Tusq nut. If you think you know better than them, fine. But you might end up chasing your tail with a bad guitar because you think you have a better way of doing it than Gibson does. That's what you are doing now.

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Installing a nut takes a lot of experience. It's easy to get it messed up like it is now. Whatever you use, the important thing is to get it installed my somebody who knows what they're doing and can install it right the first time. Gibson tends to know what they're doing. They use a Corian or Tusq nut. If you think you know better than them, fine. But you might end up chasing your tail with a bad guitar because you think you have a better way of doing it than Gibson does. That's what you are doing now.

 

 

+1

 

Amen.

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I had no idea there were this many replies. I have my notifications set to email me, but it didn't. Anyways, it looks like I'm gonna try a precut bone nut. Not because of the poll, but it helped. I do know what I'm doing, but to double check my capabilities, I check my Epi and my tele copy, and they are intonated as close to perfect as I care to get it to. But, if I can't get the bone nut to intonate, then I'll take it to a professional tech.

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I put the new PRS nuts on all of my electrics. They're a typical self-lubricated synthetic (like Black Tusq) but they've impregnated it with brass dust. Makes it last forever and stay in tune great. Also adds a nice zing to open strings.

 

-Ryan

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