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Epiphone Sheraton II Korea - bridge issue


Seastone
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Hi there,

I own a 1995 Sheraton II made in the Samick factory. As some users possibly know, the bridge spacing is 72 mm, a quite nasty thing. Normal spacing is 74 mm. since my bridge saddles started to crumble, I have been looking for a replacement. It's been a struggle, nobody knew which replacement bridge fits. After two weeks of searching, just by an accident, I found out, Duesenberg Steel Saddle bridge fits perfectly. I hope, I could help Sheraton II players with this post.

 

post-63018-087683500 1393327099_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for the information! Welcome to the forum!

 

+1 and yes...Welcome.

Good info. The subject comes up around here frequently.

Seems that all the 90's Sheratons out of Korea were that way. Plenty of threads on how to

get around it....but....

I've never seen anyone post that they found one that was a direct fit.

 

Welcome aboard,

 

Willy

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Many thanks. I am really happy to share my findings with other Sheraton players. Besides the bridge fits, it improves the sound of the guitar. And this for 40 euros!

I will upgrade the guitar, new pickups from Leosounds will soon replace the original ones. I am quite excited about these changes. Well, the Sheraton has done great services for the past 19 years. Now it needs an acknowledgement. ;-)

If you wish I can keep interested Sheraton players posted, how my upgrades improve the sound.

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Yes, welcome and thanks for the info, very useful to know.

 

I looked up a seller and the bridge is described as having, " A receiving hole for M4 Studs is designed as a "slot". Therefore, our bridge fits as a replacement for stud spacing of 72.6 mm to 73.6 mm (center to center)."

 

Obviously some room in those measurements. Glad to hear you got yours sorted.

 

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  • 2 months later...

Hi there,

I own a 1995 Sheraton II made in the Samick factory. As some users possibly know, the bridge spacing is 72 mm, a quite nasty thing. Normal spacing is 74 mm. since my bridge saddles started to crumble, I have been looking for a replacement. It's been a struggle, nobody knew which replacement bridge fits. After two weeks of searching, just by an accident, I found out, Duesenberg Steel Saddle bridge fits perfectly. I hope, I could help Sheraton II players with this post.

 

post-63018-087683500 1393327099_thumb.jpg

 

Thanks a bunch for the info. I'm very impatiently awaiting the arrival of my first Korean Sheratons. Its a dark vintage burst. Have been lurking about before the purchase and since trying to learn as much as I can. My bridge is the big fat version that looks to be the odd ball size.

 

Question I have for you is did the Duesenberg bridge fit right on the original posts of your Sheraton or did you replace those too?

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Thanks a bunch for the info. I'm very impatiently awaiting the arrival of my first Korean Sheratons. Its a dark vintage burst. Have been lurking about before the purchase and since trying to learn as much as I can. My bridge is the big fat version that looks to be the odd ball size.

 

Question I have for you is did the Duesenberg bridge fit right on the original posts of your Sheraton or did you replace those too?

 

I had to buy converters from m8 (Korean standard in the Nineties) to m4. But I am not sure if you need to get them. If you do, here are the links to the manufacturer webshop:

Duesenberg steel saddle bridge: http://www.rockinger.com/index.php?cat=WG082&lang=ENG&product=3645N%2F3645C%2F3645S%2F3645G

Converters m4 - m8: http://www.rockinger.com/index.php?cat=WG082&lang=ENG&product=36034

 

Please check, if you have already m4 studs.

 

Besides this the only stock bridge suitable for the old spacing (72 mm), it sounds really great. I mean, you can hear the difference between the stock bridge from the Nineties and the Duesenberg bridge. My band mates do it as well, so I can be sure, there is one. ;-)

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I had to buy converters from m8 (Korean standard in the Nineties) to m4. But I am not sure if you need to get them. If you do, here are the links to the manufacturer webshop:

Duesenberg steel saddle bridge: http://www.rockinger.com/index.php?cat=WG082&lang=ENG&product=3645N%2F3645C%2F3645S%2F3645G

Converters m4 - m8: http://www.rockinger.com/index.php?cat=WG082&lang=ENG&product=36034

 

Please check, if you have already m4 studs.

 

Besides this the only stock bridge suitable for the old spacing (72 mm), it sounds really great. I mean, you can hear the difference between the stock bridge from the Nineties and the Duesenberg bridge. My band mates do it as well, so I can be sure, there is one. ;-)

 

Thanks for the reply. That's what I was afraid of. Will have to see when the guitar gets her on Thursday! I can't seem to find any US sellers of m4-m8 converters.

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Well, no worries until Thursday. ;-)

If you need the converters, just try to find an US distibutor of the ABM. This is a German company, a bit pricey, providing high end guitar parts: http://www.abm-mueller.com/index2.html

I know that Duesenberg guitars are sold in the US, that could be the path to follow as well.

Good luck!

 

Yeah Duesenberg USA has the bridges for sale on there site but not the posts.

 

Found these and think it should work Ebay link

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Yes, this the old one. Well, if you wanna change the bridge, then you need to take the Duesenberg one. And the converters as well. I did not get it, that you have bought an older Sheraton. But anyway, it is a great guitar. Mine is from 1994, no problems with electronics or wood work. Great value for money, and the finish ist the most beautiful one, tobacco sunburst, just as mine. :-)

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So the guitar arrived yesterday. Found a creative option for a bridge that seems to be working great. Thanks to the help of Seastone I knew I need some converters. Found some on eBay but they have regular website. Thought I'd share my findings for those in the states looking for these babies.

 

Philadelphia Luthier Tools - Conversion Posts

 

I wasn't going to replace the bridge until I got the guitar and had a look over it. Was planning on ordering the Duesenberg one but thought I'd see the bridges I had hanging around. Come to find the Compton Compensated bridge I had from my old Pro Jet fit the new conversion posts but were super tight. Anyway I just took a small roundfile and gave it a couple runs to give the posts a little more room and on she went. Was not expecting the intonation to be perfect but it is really really good. It at least got me started and is better then the original with a broken saddle screw.

 

Am planning on switching everything to Nickel (57 Classics, Grover locking) so I threw on a Gotoh Stop tail that also need a little filing to fit the post width. Anyway thought I'd pass on some info.

 

photo%20%2810%29-XL.jpg

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So the guitar arrived yesterday. Found a creative option for a bridge that seems to be working great. Thanks to the help of Seastone I knew I need some converters. Found some on eBay but they have regular website. Thought I'd share my findings for those in the states looking for these babies.

 

Philadelphia Luthier Tools - Conversion Posts

 

I wasn't going to replace the bridge until I got the guitar and had a look over it. Was planning on ordering the Duesenberg one but thought I'd see the bridges I had hanging around. Come to find the Compton Compensated bridge I had from my old Pro Jet fit the new conversion posts but were super tight. Anyway I just took a small roundfile and gave it a couple runs to give the posts a little more room and on she went. Was not expecting the intonation to be perfect but it is really really good. It at least got me started and is better then the original with a broken saddle screw.

 

Am planning on switching everything to Nickel (57 Classics, Grover locking) so I threw on a Gotoh Stop tail that also need a little filing to fit the post width. Anyway thought I'd pass on some info.

 

photo%20%2810%29-XL.jpg

 

This looks great! Well done, really useful upgrade.

You have mentioned, you think about PU replacement. I would consider different manufacturers, not only the obvious one. I think, the Classic 57 are good, but you can possibly get even nearer to the classic vintage ES 335 sound trying an alternative. Since you always buy PUs "deaf", this is a very hard decision to make. I was looking around for an alternative to the Classic 57 and found out that PUs from LeoSounds or Bare Knuckles do the job very well. After the e-mail contact with the owner of LeoSounds, I decided to go for his pickups, hand-wound, made entirely with US vintage components. He proposed to set a custom pair: for the bridge a warm and creamy PU, for the neck a replica of the original PAF. I followed his suggestion and my guitar sounds great now. The PUs are not that hot (or have less output) than the Gibson ones, but in my case, I play through Marshall 1962 RI, it is an even better thing having more control. I can really start with a very clean and warm jazzy sound (which I do not play) and end up having classic rock sound. This PU combination gives you an endless sound shaping possibilities. The PUs are not very pricey in Europe, I paid 200 Euros for both PU incl. covers.

I cannot say very much about Bare Knuckle PUs, but I have heard, the are very good as well. And at least my luthier did not look very happy hearing, that I was for Classic 57. But the sound is a matter of taste, yo can barely argue. ;-)

It is just an idea to consider and I am sure the Classic 57 will meet your needs. Good luck with your further upgrades.

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This looks great! Well done, really useful upgrade.

You have mentioned, you think about PU replacement. I would consider different manufacturers, not only the obvious one. I think, the Classic 57 are good, but you can possibly get even nearer to the classic vintage ES 335 sound trying an alternative. Since you always buy PUs "deaf", this is a very hard decision to make. I was looking around for an alternative to the Classic 57 and found out that PUs from LeoSounds or Bare Knuckles do the job very well. After the e-mail contact with the owner of LeoSounds, I decided to go for his pickups, hand-wound, made entirely with US vintage components. He proposed to set a custom pair: for the bridge a warm and creamy PU, for the neck a replica of the original PAF. I followed his suggestion and my guitar sounds great now. The PUs are not that hot (or have less output) than the Gibson ones, but in my case, I play through Marshall 1962 RI, it is an even better thing having more control. I can really start with a very clean and warm jazzy sound (which I do not play) and end up having classic rock sound. This PU combination gives you an endless sound shaping possibilities. The PUs are not very pricey in Europe, I paid 200 Euros for both PU incl. covers.

I cannot say very much about Bare Knuckle PUs, but I have heard, the are very good as well. And at least my luthier did not look very happy hearing, that I was for Classic 57. But the sound is a matter of taste, yo can barely argue. ;-)

It is just an idea to consider and I am sure the Classic 57 will meet your needs. Good luck with your further upgrades.

 

Thanks for the ideas and if I didn't already find a cheap set of perfect condition 57's I'd would have looked into these. Thanks

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Hooray!

 

The Dusenberg bridge fits my 90s Samick Sheraton II perfectly. The posts from Philidelphia Luthier Supply made it a totally bolt on experience. No more rattly junk on the guitar. I also had a bone nut cut and installed at the same time.

 

What a huge upgrade!

 

  • better sustain
  • even sustain across all strings at all fret positions
  • clarified note separation on chords
  • much bigger and clearer harmonic content

 

Even before this upgrade I still wouldn't trade this guitar for any Gibson DOT or 355 (or any 3 series)I ever played.

Next some new tuners and a tailpiece. I will have flipped it completely from worn out cheapy gold parts to quality silver looking stuff. The resale value of the instrument won't be any higher but since it isn't going to be resold in my lifetime, who cares. I've owned a bunch of electric guitars over the past 45 years. Some of them have a resale value of 7x this Sheraton. The Sheraton is the best instrument I've ever owned and one of the best electric guitars I've ever played.

post-21336-068179700 1405861254_thumb.jpg

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Hooray!

 

The Dusenberg bridge fits my 90s Samick Sheraton II perfectly. The posts from Philidelphia Luthier Supply made it a totally bolt on experience. No more rattly junk on the guitar. I also had a bone nut cut and installed at the same time.

 

What a huge upgrade!

 

  • better sustain
  • even sustain across all strings at all fret positions
  • clarified note separation on chords
  • much bigger and clearer harmonic content

 

Even before this upgrade I still wouldn't trade this guitar for any Gibson DOT or 355 (or any 3 series)I ever played.

Next some new tuners and a tailpiece. I will have flipped it completely from worn out cheapy gold parts to quality silver looking stuff. The resale value of the instrument won't be any higher but since it isn't going to be resold in my lifetime, who cares. I've owned a bunch of electric guitars over the past 45 years. Some of them have a resale value of 7x this Sheraton. The Sheraton is the best instrument I've ever owned and one of the best electric guitars I've ever played.

 

Awesome glad it worked out. I'm with you. I have no interest in spending 2-3k on a 335 but don't mind putting in the money to keep this Sherry for life. I've had mine a couple months and enjoy it everyday.

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  • 2 years later...

Not only is the bridge spacing wacky, the tailpiece is also wacky...My 90 Sheraton is like a 79mm..The standard stud spacing on the TP is 82..On another note, the pickup height screws are impossible to find..I went to a nut and bolt specialty factory here and they said that thread system used on the Sheraton is not known to man..(his exact words)...Most use a 3-48 screw..No standard or metric screws match what they use on my Sheraton...Its a nightmare...lol...I wanted to change everything out to chrome as the gold plating on the guitar was in bad shape..After hitting dead end after dead end on the above mentioned items as well as not finding the neck pickup cover (48mm pole spacing)...I found that "NEVER DULL" will remove the gold plating fast..Thats what I finally wound up doing, and everything is fine now...A word to the wise for Korean Sheraton owners..be careful when trying to change out hardware as the individuals who designed those items must have been high...lol...G/L to all

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