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slotted headstocks , issues?


blindboygrunt

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Some folk say they're harder to re-string... never really thought that myself though. I had two, still have one.... Martin 0-28VS and the Recording King ROS-627. The slotted headstock is a thing of beauty in my opinion... but everything is subjective.

 

Never had any issues with them myself to be honest.

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A couple of my Nationals and an old classical are slots.

 

Until recently I had never had one and have had some difficulties re- stringing....but forums to the rescue and a string change plan involving changing something like number 4, then 3, across to 2, then 6, then 1 and .........oh oh, I can't remember and shall leave the strings on until I sell it!

 

 

BluesKing777.

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So , fiddly then.

Like you say BK . would be more important to thread them in a certain order than a regular headstock.

 

 

With the Nationals, yes. I don't know about acoustic slots.

 

So if I was changing all the strings on say, my Blues King - I would start by taking off the 6 string, 5, 4....usually replace one at a time. If I do that on the National slot, the 5 and 4 string will be sitting on top and rubbing the 6.... causing extraneous noises possibly.

 

BluesKing777.

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With a paddle headstock a lot of people work from top to bottom 1-6 (or E to e), some the reverse (e - E), some do batches of 2 at a time, 3 at a time etc... load sof different ways. With a slotted headstock it's easiest to start from the middle and work outwards.... Like all things, there are a myriad of 'issues' reported online and folk waxing lyrical across many paragraphs detailing this to the point where even OCD sufferers have lost the will to live and have subsequently tidied up furiously before topping themselves in a manner that wont ruin the vibe of the room for the person finding them....

 

In all reality, if they can't suss out how to put on a set of strings reasonably perhaps it's a hobby that's not for these lyrical waxers.

 

In short, start in the middle and work outwards... job's a good'un.

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But you gotta make sure you cut your strings before you start winding. that saves alot of headaches

 

Then you need to exercise caution if using round-core strings like Sunbeams, as they warn against cutting strings until they are under some tension. The core and winding aren't locked together with round-core strings like they are with typical hex-core strings,

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Looks cool. Serves no useful purpose I can think of. I'm pretty sure I could get used to stringing one in a try or two.

 

P

 

There is some mythology about the benefits of the string tension/angle or something of slotted over solid headstocks. The problem is the string tension is the same from the nut to the bridge no matter what type of headstock. So what advantage there could be I do not have a clue. But I for whatever reason find slotted headstocks easier to string than solid.

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Then you need to exercise caution if using round-core strings like Sunbeams, as they warn against cutting strings until they are under some tension. The core and winding aren't locked together with round-core strings like they are with typical hex-core strings,

When restringing the classical guitar formerly owned by my sister, I always left the strings full length after knotting them until tuning up and then cut the overlength. We always used Augustine nylons as far as I remember - it was during the 1970s. My sister lost interest and later donated the guitar to a Turkish friend before she left Germany for home. Until I bought my first electric, there hasn't been a single guitar in my parents' household :(

 

No problem

 

12.jpg

This one looks darn awesome to me. [thumbup]

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I actually love the LOOK of the slotted headstock…….but they are no fun to restring, and judging by the amount of "repaired" slotted headstocks I see on Craigs list…I think they may be a little more fragile than a paddle headstock. One thing I found out the hard way……on some old parlor guitars (around turn-of-the-century) there were NO standard sizes of the three-on-a-plate tuners. Sooooo, sometimes you have to fill the post holes of the old tuners, and re-drill new postholes to get the more modern tuner sets to work on the old headstocks….just FYI…….

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Been playing slothead small gtrs for years, the extra break angle over the nut does help restrict the string movement in the slot, which is important for small body guitars. We have 2 parlors, 2 classicals, a grand concert, and an OOO. The tone does seems to be more solid, but don't see the benefit in bigger models. After you've strung a few it's simple but does take a couple minutes longer.

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