Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums
Sign in to follow this  
DJClem

J45adj query

Recommended Posts

Hi all

 

first post and apologies in advance for a possibly/probably stupid question.

 

I have been looking at a 1966 j45adj, and in most of my related searching I've only noticed adjustable bridge models in the mid 60s j 45 s I've seen advertised.

 

So my question is... Were all mid 60 j45 s made with adjustable bridges...or just some?

 

If it was just some, my second question would be...would an adj model which had mods done to fix the bridge be, to all intents and purposes, identical to a non-adjustable version?

 

Hope that makes sense.

 

Your expert advice much appreciated.

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup. In 1956 the ADJ bridge was offered as an option on the J-45 becoming a standard feature in 1961.

 

Thanks for that - clarifies it for me.

 

As an aside the 1966 one I played sounded great. Much better to my ears than a new standard or even the new true vintage I tried. Over here in Australia though they're not cheap...so I'm coming to terms with paying more for a banged up 50 year old than for a shiny new one..,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it was just some, my second question would be...would an adj model which had mods done to fix the bridge be, to all intents and purposes, identical to a non-adjustable version?

 

 

 

Not necessarily. There are a bunch of parts to the adjustable saddle system, some of which cannot be removed from the guitar without removing the bridge. The photo below shows all the parts of an adjustable bridge system from 1968. The metal parts which are screwed together are the actual adjustment mechanism. While most of it can be removed by undoing the heavy nuts shown on the assembly, the brass threaded insert cannot, as its flange sits sandwiched on the top of the guitar under the bridge.

 

Lots of people remove as much of the system as possible, then fill the large open slot with a solid rosewood insert that has been routed out for a conventional bone saddle. This will get you very close to the set-up of the standard non-adjustable bridge, but not exactly.

 

One of the suspected culprits of this system is the large, laminated (plywood) bridgeplate (shown here in two pieces after it was removed) that backs it up, at least in the late 1960's. Many people believe this is one of the major items causing the duller sound often associated with some versions of the adjustable saddle.

 

boneadjustable.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are a bunch of parts to the adjustable saddle system, some of which cannot be removed from the guitar without removing the bridge.

 

 

My brain is a bit hazy on the subject but didn't Gibson use two different kinds of ADJ bridges in the 1960s? I do not recall the specifics but one was lighter than the other or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My brain is a bit hazy on the subject but didn't Gibson use two different kinds of ADJ bridges in the 1960s? I do not recall the specifics but one was lighter than the other or something.

 

 

The adjusting screws are a bit different on some of them, but I don't know about other differences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One was a hollow black plastic bridge. Usually came with the adjustable ceramic saddle. These tended to warp and crack. Gibson then went with a rosewood solid bridge but retained the adjustable saddle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not necessarily. There are a bunch of parts to the adjustable saddle system, some of which cannot be removed from the guitar without removing the bridge. The photo below shows all the parts of an adjustable bridge system from 1968. The metal parts which are screwed together are the actual adjustment mechanism. While most of it can be removed by undoing the heavy nuts shown on the assembly, the brass threaded insert cannot, as its flange sits sandwiched on the top of the guitar under the bridge.

 

Lots of people remove as much of the system as possible, then fill the large open slot with a solid rosewood insert that has been routed out for a conventional bone saddle. This will get you very close to the set-up of the standard non-adjustable bridge, but not exactly.

 

One of the suspected culprits of this system is the large, laminated (plywood) bridgeplate (shown here in two pieces after it was removed) that backs it up, at least in the late 1960's. Many people believe this is one of the major items causing the duller sound often associated with some versions of the adjustable saddle.

 

boneadjustable.jpg

 

 

... big bridge plate... ... and a tone killer..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...