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benc

Follow up on J35

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I said I would do a follow up on the J35 that had a gap behind the saddle in the bridge. I sent it back for replacement. The new one is here and the top is not nearly as good as far as silking but the action is good and a good tight fit on the saddle.The back has a cosmetic flaw about 2-3 inches long. Looks like some kind of clamp mark,not sure?

It doesn't sound as good to my ear as the other one. From what I have been reading a bone saddle and maybe TI strings would help the sound.Would taking the element out and removing it out from under the saddle make much differance in sound? Any other advice to help tone?

Thanks

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Wouldn't it have saved you alot of trouble by just replacing the saddle with a proper fitting one on the first guitar?

 

I have never found anything simple I could do that would change a guitar's basic voice. It is what it is. If you do not like it now I doubt there is much you can do short of something drastic like rebracing it that will make a difference

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Zomby, it was also low on the high E string. Looked like someone had filed the nut slot too low.Honestly I should have gone to a differant vendor.It had to be a return and resale item that maybe they didnt catch all that was wrong with it when it was returned,don't know if they would knowingly resale one in that shape.

I could still return it, don't like the blem on the back.Probably will not buy onlie again, would be nice if you can hold it and strum it.

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it the second one you got it flawed ... you should return it also

+1. You don't ever want to "settle" for a guitar, there are too many out there. Good Luck!

 

 

 

 

 

JC

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Where I am coming from is I pretty much take it for granted that any guitar that comes into the house is going to need a setup to get it where I want it to be. So the nut and saddle are very possibly going bye bye anyway. I have been known to shim saddles or drop some supper glue in a nut slot that had a groove cut too low until I could get around to taking care of it properly. Crap I got one right now that has cardboard wedged in the saddle and nut grooves on the low E to raise it as I got a bit overzealous when sanding and filing. I keep thinking I should get around to taking care of it but just lazy I guess.

 

If you are not happy with the J-35 you now have though, I would also see if I could get a refund if you no longer trust the dealer. These guitars are not hard to find so you would have a wide choice to places to deal with.

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Where I am coming from is I pretty much take it for granted that any guitar that comes into the house is going to need a setup to get it where I want it to be. So the nut and saddle are very possibly going bye bye anyway. I have been known to shim saddles or drop some supper glue in a nut slot that had a groove cut too low until I could get around to taking care of it properly. Crap I got one right now that has cardboard wedged in the saddle and nut grooves on the low E to raise it as I got a bit overzealous when sanding and filing. I keep thinking I should get around to taking care of it but just lazy I guess.

 

If you are not happy with the J-35 you now have though, I would also see if I could get a refund if you no longer trust the dealer. These guitars are not hard to find so you would have a wide choice to places to deal with.

Hey, even the pros do it. Here's Sean Watkins with the high e on his J-45 shimmed at the nut with paper, cardboard or something. I've had to do it a few times over the years while on tour until I could properly take care of the nut slot or make a new nut. Bottom line is if you have a great sounding/playing guitar with some minor issues like a nut slot that's been filed too low or a saddle that may need changing out, you may have to do some temporary jerry-rigging...but hang onto the guitar. The minor things can be fixed.

 

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For all replies thank you for the advice and the way you would do things if it were you in this situation.Zomby I do understand where your coming from doing it yourselfe,this is my first good guitar and I guess (for the money) I just want it to be better than all that was wrong with it.Looking for a good one and being able to hold it in your hands is probably the way I will go, unless this one grows on me.

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I just didnt realize it was that easy to do, I might have made a mistake sending it back.I don't know, just really bumed out over all this. live and learn.

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Sorry you're dealing with this. I know you're feeling bad but hey, we've all been through it so you're not alone and it's all a learning process. I agree with those who suggested sending the second one back since I have a feeling you won't be happy with it and will be wishing you'd kept the first one. I feel bad for you and wish I could offer better advice!

 

DC

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Sorry about these issues. Nuts! [crying]

I will not "Fret",The "Key" to this is when you get "Plucked" off your horse, is to "Saddle" up try again.Guess I will cross that "Bridge" when I get there. I am not "Pinned" down to one guitar and will "Pick" another. lol

Good bunch of people over here! Thanks for yor help!

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Hey, even the pros do it. Here's Sean Watkins with the high e on his J-45 shimmed at the nut with paper, cardboard or something. I've had to do it a few times over the years while on tour until I could properly take care of the nut slot or make a new nut. Bottom line is if you have a great sounding/playing guitar with some minor issues like a nut slot that's been filed too low or a saddle that may need changing out, you may have to do some temporary jerry-rigging...but hang onto the guitar. The minor things can be fixed.

 

 

 

What's next - back to capos made with a pencil and rubber band?

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What's next - back to capos made with a pencil and rubber band?

Ha! Never had to do that but still use a Bill Russell capo on my bouzouki so I can quickly slide to a different position/key change during play.

 

DC

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I will not "Fret",The "Key" to this is when you get "Plucked" off your horse, is to "Saddle" up try again.Guess I will cross that "Bridge" when I get there. I am not "Pinned" down to one guitar and will "Pick" another. lol

Good bunch of people over here! Thanks for yor help!

Ha - that's the spirit!

 

I too would think you'd probably be better off returning it right now & starting a fresh search. Consider the time you've spent thus far as knowledge gained. Your experiences have you better prepared to assess and compare. One thing I always recommend if at all possible, is to play multiple examples of the same model side-by-side. It's amazing how wide the variations can be - and generally a very clear winner will emerge.

 

Best of luck in your quest!

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Hey, even the pros do it. Here's Sean Watkins with the high e on his J-45 shimmed at the nut with paper, cardboard or something. I've had to do it a few times over the years while on tour until I could properly take care of the nut slot or make a new nut. Bottom line is if you have a great sounding/playing guitar with some minor issues like a nut slot that's been filed too low or a saddle that may need changing out, you may have to do some temporary jerry-rigging...but hang onto the guitar. The minor things can be fixed.

 

 

 

Cool video. Great player and guitar, so I will watch and learn.

 

Thanks for sharing the video,

 

 

 

Freddie

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Benc,hang in there as you will get it sorted out. Every high end guitar like the J-35 that I have bought has had something I needed to do it after I getting it home....why, I don't know, but I have came to accept this as fact. Zombie is right about this. By chance, I ended up with a new J-35 as well and I plugged it in last night and whoa mamma it sounded so bad I wanted to vomit. I will be doing Gibby surgery today to try to improve it...as well as sorting out some problematic SG Standard frets (2013 model as well). Like a dude into cars and working on/customizing them, it is a labour of love, although it still can be a pain in the ***.

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