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Government ser.II Explorer


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I thought my amp was giving me problems till I figured out my annoyance.

When my amp is on the dirty channel and I rub my finger across the pick guard on my 2013 Government series II Explorer with either pup hot, I get a scratchy noise through the amp.

With strings muffled and I rub gently with my index finger on pick guard I get a scratchy nose.

The closer I get to pick up selector switch when touching pick guard it gets louder.

When I'm playing and I have my little finger supporting on pick guard and it is moving I can hear the scratching.

That is when I noticed it and thought it was my amp.

Anyone ever have this?

How do I fix it?

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This is due to discharging static electricity. All of my guitars suffer from it more or less, mostly depending on air humidity and my clothing. Pickguards and back plates are affected as well as pickup mounting screws.

 

The best ways to avoid this trouble is clothing soaked with sweat, use of a wireless transmitter instead of a guitar cable, or both as a matter of course.

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If you can post an audio sample to this thread, it will help us with your diagnosis. What sounds like scratching to you MAY be static. That requires a different triage.

 

That said: It sounds to me like a loose wire problem, likely the bridge ground. Here's how I would diagnose it. Your Mileage May Vary. If you choose to perform this procedure, you accept all responsibility for its consequences.

 

Continuity needs to be tested, imho. If you do not have a digital voltmeter(DVM), take the guitar to someone who does. You might need to get a friend to help, or use clips on the DVM test leads.

 

Pop off/unscrew the control cavity cover plate on the back. Turn the DVM on. Set the DVM to show resistance on its lowest scale (usually single ohms).

 

Attach one clip (touch one lead) to the potentiometer backing "tin can" or the metal lining of the control cavity, and the other clip (lead) to the bridge. The DVM should read 0 (zero) because the bridge should be grounded.

 

Watch the DVM readout while you move your finger on the pickguard. If you hear the scratching and the DVM display changes from 0, then you are intermittently shaking the ground connection. Look on the internet for a procedure describing "how to ground your bridge".

 

If the DVM stays at a steady zero, and you still make the scratching noise, I'm baffled. Time to take it to your FLGS and ask a tech for help.

 

Don't forget: Replace the control cavity cover.

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All of my guitars are grounded properly. It seems to depend in first order on the different triboelectric effect of different finishes. Some finishes accidentally are more prone to that, others less. It is varying with the particular finish as such and its recent history.

 

The worst case I know of was a properly wired and grounded Fender Stratocaster strung with Elixir strings, owned by a pal of mine. To avoid crackling, the guy had to stand barefoot on a wetted, conductive, grounded mat during a professional studio recording. Since the Elixir strings have a non-conductive surface, nothing else was of help.

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This is due to discharging static electricity. All of my guitars suffer from it more or less,

 

 

Static...That's the word. not scratchy...

Is that the nature of the beast?

 

 

Till I bought my Les Paul last year I have never had a guitar with a pick guard! (26 years)

So I don't know.

I heard no problem with LP. Only the Explorer.

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If you can post an audio sample to this thread, it will help us with your diagnosis. What sounds like scratching to you MAY be static. That requires a different triage.

 

That said: It sounds to me like a loose wire problem, likely the bridge ground. Here's how I would diagnose it. Your Mileage May Vary. If you choose to perform this procedure, you accept all responsibility for its consequences.

 

Continuity needs to be tested, imho. If you do not have a digital voltmeter(DVM), take the guitar to someone who does. You might need to get a friend to help, or use clips on the DVM test leads.

 

Pop off/unscrew the control cavity cover plate on the back. Turn the DVM on. Set the DVM to show resistance on its lowest scale (usually single ohms).

 

Attach one clip (touch one lead) to the potentiometer backing "tin can" or the metal lining of the control cavity, and the other clip (lead) to the bridge. The DVM should read 0 (zero) because the bridge should be grounded.

 

Watch the DVM readout while you move your finger on the pickguard. If you hear the scratching and the DVM display changes from 0, then you are intermittently shaking the ground connection. Look on the internet for a procedure describing "how to ground your bridge".

 

If the DVM stays at a steady zero, and you still make the scratching noise, I'm baffled. Time to take it to your FLGS and ask a tech for help.

 

Don't forget: Replace the control cavity cover.

 

 

I do have a DVM and will do a ohm test.

Great idea and easy enough. [thumbup]

Thanks

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