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Gibson 1959 ES345 Reissue


luvgibson

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IF this is true, there are a few people (willing to pay the premium) that are in for a real treat.

 

I happen to have one of the batch the Nashville Custom Shop made around 2000. It's one of the finest built Gibsons (fit and finish) that I've owned. If built using the proper and correct materials/parts, templates and electronics, this guitar will be an incredible upgrade versus the standard Memphis production model.

 

I don't mean to re-open the Memphis vs Nashville custom shop debates, but I hope they build it in Nashville.

 

 

Edit: Photo added.

11369863976_408b914b58_o.jpg

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Why for the $$ that Gibson wants for these guitars can't they get the darn volume and tone control knobs correct? For this kind of money it is NOT that much of a big deal to put the correct period correct knobs on these guitars which they currently are not doing! jim from Maine currently working in Denver,Colorado

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If built using the proper and correct materials/parts, templates and electronics, this guitar will be an incredible upgrade versus the standard Memphis production model.

 

I have to disagree there. I can't think of a "major upgrade" that could be done to the Memphis 345. I suppose hide glue would be considered one. Other than that, I think the Memphis models have it going.

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Has anyone else noticed that the twin parallelogram inlays on the ES-345 and other models changed sometime maybe back in the 90s? The inlays became wider and thus the space between them narrowed. Compare any Gibson with these inlays from the 1980s or earlier with one made in the 90s or later, and I think you'll see what I mean. The new ones look strange to me - almost like they're a Gibson copy. This doesn't bother me enough to pass on these guitars. My favorite Gibson I've ever bought is my 2011 ES-345.

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Has anyone else noticed that the twin parallelogram inlays on the ES-345 and other models changed sometime maybe back in the 90s? The inlays became wider and thus the space between them narrowed. Compare any Gibson with these inlays from the 1980s or earlier with one made in the 90s or later, and I think you'll see what I mean. The new ones look strange to me - almost like they're a Gibson copy. This doesn't bother me enough to pass on these guitars. My favorite Gibson I've ever bought is my 2011 ES-345.

 

Yep, you are right spitball. I've noticed it too but never have thought to mention it before.

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Yep, you are right spitball. I've noticed it too but never have thought to mention it before.

 

I have no idea why the dimensions were changed. The old ones look better. But as I mentioned, I like the new guitars enough to overlook this.

 

The material seems to be a little brighter in color, too, making the change more noticeable to me.

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Well, I've pulled the plug and ordered one of these 1959 reissue Memphis ES345s.

 

I can just about afford it (with difficulty) but I figure that this is not a loss maker guitar. And besides, I have never gotten over selling my original Gibson ES345 1964.

 

In many ways, this "new" 1959 reissue ES345 probably suits me better re its spruce top (rather than maple) and my current inclinations towards jazz and blues.

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probably suits me better re its spruce top

 

I read the above linked website as "spruce top and back BRACING", describing the bracing. This still makes no sense, since other than the center block and glueing kerf around the perimeter, THERE IS NO BRACING INSIDE THIS GUITAR.

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Why can't Gibson make the darn guitar exactly like it was made in 1959? For the life of me I just don't get it. Sorry but for the amount of money that all of these guitars cost I find NO excuse on why this company can't do that very simply! jim in Maine currently working in Denver,Colorado

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I agree with you spitball. I just pick up a 2009 ES-345 that has been hanging in the shop since new. It's got a few minor imperfections but it such a nice guitar I can all but forget any minor flaws. It is a Memphis and not a Nashville built guitar but it's a beautiful guitar, near perfect build with great playability and sound. For me the neck is perfect. I have been dreaming on this one for almost 2 years now. the only thing I will change the gold toped reflector knobs and a pair of strap locks.

Thanks John

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...I just pick up a 2009 ES-345 that has been hanging in the shop since new...It is a Memphis and not a Nashville built guitar but it's a beautiful guitar, near perfect build with great playability and sound. For me the neck is perfect...

 

Sounds like you made a good choice! I can echo your words about playability and sound. And yes, the neck is wonderful!

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I think the spruce bracing they refer to is the two pieces between the arched top and back and the center block. It is my understanding that these filler pieces were originally made of spruce.

Thanks John

 

John, do you have pictures of your ES-345?

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I think the spruce bracing they refer to is the two pieces between the arched top and back and the center block. It is my understanding that these filler pieces were originally made of spruce.

Thanks John

 

Ah, thanks for the info!

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