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Looking for a Hummingbird... assistance needed.


rkearns10

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Happy Sunday Everyone!

 

So I'm looking for a Hummingbird guitar. -- I've made up my mind and it's just what I would like to buy. However, having said that, after some due diligence I've obviously uncovered that there are specific makes and types to pursue. From what I gather, the True Vintage is the most desirable of the category. I've yet to really find any out there though, so I'm assuming these are no longer in the market? If this is the case, are there any being currently produced that are of worthy quality to purchase?

 

If not, what would the next choice/era be? I'd rather play a model at guitar center or a local shop and test it myself, as opposed to just blindly ordering a bird just because it's the ideal make/model. So that sort of puts me at a restricted to recently produced models. --- Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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In this period of time you first have to make up you mind whether you want the authentic mahogany Bird or the newly (re)introduced mable model.

This is a matter of a few view-points - Are you devoted to the classics or willing to experiment. The 2 woods are highly different.

Also you have to think a bit about details as type of pick-guard and tuners (the latter are easier exchanged than the first) - not to mention the exact hue of burst.

Redish - orange - caramel - ebony/black - wine - yellowish, , , etc. If this dimention matters at all of course.

 

In other words, try as many as possible, , , and remember once you decide direction, even various #'s of the same version will give you various sounds and feels.

Though sieblings they have individual nature, which you probably know. . .

 

Have a good hunt - a lucky situation and way to spend the summer.

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Thanks for the color on this, E-minor!

 

Is the vintage Mahogany leaps and bounds a better tone than the newly introduced Maple?

 

I'm looking for a Bird in the Heritage Cherry Sunburst hue.--- From there, I'm a bit indifferent to minute cosmetics, but am just looking to maximize the best tone/play-ability. So from top down, with this hue in mind, what would be the ideal(ish) models to hunt after?

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I had two different standard HB's. Nice guitars but, to me, they weren't anything special. Bought a HB TV last year and it's one of the best guitars I have ever owned, both in playability and sound. Doesn't even compare to the standards, which are long gone. The TV is one I don't think I'll ever get rid of.

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Better and better, , , won't judge and who could ?

But the Hummingbird is hog-creature and (almost) always was.

 

Maple can be a very good tone-wood, and it's interesting to hear it connected to short-scale (Doves and Firebirds are long scale Gibsons).

Listening to Polecastros Music Villa tests, the new maple-Birds sound very good, still the question is how much Bird they are when the strings fade to normal and below and you meet the guitar face to face.

I'd personally like to get to know one of these, but something tells me you are headed for a mahogany True Vintage. And they are still to be found on the Gibson site.

 

Have patience and keep eyes and ears open. Don't know how close you are to shops or other test-possibilities, but take the time needed.

And notice the people here who have found the right Bird (TV or plain).

 

They/we all talk about them with light in our eyes - as highly treasured holy keepers. . .

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Again, thanks for the in-depth repsonse on this.---Much appreciated.

 

I try to be objective with these sorts of things and I'd be inclined to think that a blindfolded tone test would only yield to experts ears, but most might not be able to notice a largely distinct difference in tone.

 

Now having said that I'm sure the true vintage is most likely a superior beast, but that's not to say that a maple re-issue can't make it in the ballpark.---Going to get out there and play some of those some more.

 

Thanks for the help everyone.

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I try to be objective with these sorts of things and I'd be inclined to think that a blindfolded tone test would only yield to experts ears, but most might not be able to notice a largely distinct difference in tone.

 

 

You are a Newbie here, but I can't tell if you are a novice as a player/listener/wood-ear too.

However you'll soon learn to hear the differences between tone-woods and fx old and contemporary Birds.

It gets more difficult when goin' from TV's to Standards, but you'll find out.

The real challenge is found when A/B'ing various #'s of the same model - especially if you have to remember sound'n'feel over days or weeks.

 

Just go ahead - it's serious all fun. . .

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I had two different standard HB's. Nice guitars but, to me, they weren't anything special. Bought a HB TV last year and it's one of the best guitars I have ever owned, both in playability and sound. Doesn't even compare to the standards, which are long gone. The TV is one I don't think I'll ever get rid of.

 

I agree with most of this. I owned a great 2011 Hummingbird Modern Classic. It had that classic Hummingbird tone. However, it sounded best when played more aggressively with a heavier touch than I naturally play with. It really sounded best played with a pick. I play only finger and have a lighter touch. I needed a more responsive guitar but I wanted that distance Hummingbird tone.

 

This is why I sold my Huumingbird Modern Classic and purchased my 2013 Hummingbird True Vintage. It is more alive, responsive , and has a more open tone. The TV version is braced lighter and has a nicer finish that I prefer. The MC version does come with a pickup. But the TV version has the upgraded case.

 

Check out Wildwood Guitars in Colorado. They have a TV Hummingbird in stock. You will probably have to buy on approval and return it if it doesn't meet your expectations. If you know that you want a Hummingbird and that is the sound you want, and its within your budget, get a True Vintage. You won't regret it.

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Save up and get the True Vintage, they are a long step ahead in terms of tone and overall satisfaction. Ive not played a standard thats come close to the TV's Ive come across. (although others apparently have, not me)

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Rk10, IMHO. There is no such thing as a maple H'Bird. Maple back and side completely changes the sound. GC sells an H'Bird Pro, which is also not a true H'Bird because it is a slope and not a square shoulder. Not knowing how you came to the decision you wanted an H'Bird, I would caution you buying something with the name, if the source of your input was based on a "real" H'Bird's reputation. I've got an H'bird TV and if it were lost, I'd go right out and buy another one. I like maple, but have an SJS 200 for that. I guess I'm an iconoclast.

Good Luck. That H'Bird TV DDan posted above at Wildwood will keep a smile on your face... Forever!

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Rk10, IMHO. There is no such thing as a maple H'Bird. Maple back and side completely changes the sound.

 

Some call it the Hummingdove, , , maybe not that bad.

 

 

GC sells an H'Bird Pro, which is also not a true H'Bird because it is a slope and not a square shoulder. Not knowing how you came to the decision you wanted an H'Bird, I would caution you buying something with the name, if the source of your input was based on a "real" H'Bird's reputation.

 

Good point - and yes, could be fine to know what sent rkearns10 towards the Hummingbird.

 

I guess I'm an iconoclast.

 

But isn't an iconoclast an icon-stormer - a person who destroys the myths and established sanctuaries. .

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It might not be a real h bird, but it still has square shoulders.

 

Sorry Pitt. Yes, you're right of course... I should have double checked, I have trouble keeping the GC versions straight.

Their H'bire is square shoulder, but has a narrower waist and is a long neck, with no actual iconic pickguard design.

So - we agree - it's not a real H'bird.

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Thanks for the responses everyone. -- Long story short I've completely decked out my electric scenario and have yet to splurge on anything on the acoustic end. --- I love the look and history of this guitar and i'm at a point where money is not an issue. -- Just want to step up my acoustic game and never look back!

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Sorry Pitt. Yes, you're right of course... I should have double checked, I have trouble keeping the GC versions straight.

Their H'bire is square shoulder, but has a narrower waist and is a long neck, with no actual iconic pickguard design.

So - we agree - it's not a real H'bird.

 

As usual the 'Bird Pro gets a bashing for not being "real". There have been so many incarnations of Hummingbirds, why is there only one considered as "real" by purists.

If Gibson see fit to name them Hummingbirds why shouldn't everyone else? Of course it's different to the first model but I love mine.

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You wouldn't happen to have the GPS coordinates for that point would you? I've been looking for it for quite awhile....

 

 

FMA

 

Hahah! Trust me this isn't the most financially savvy of moves but to me it's the only thing I love.-- Music is my religion.

 

And plus I gotta justify the 60 hour work weeks somehow!

 

Ebay message sent! Gotta somehow play that bad boy first...

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Hahah! Trust me this isn't the most financially savvy of moves but to me it's the only thing I love....And plus I gotta justify the 60 hour work weeks somehow!

 

Buying my 2010 Hummingbird MC is probably the best thing I've done for myself in years. I too work a tough job and one of the things that keeps me going is knowing that at the end of the shift I get to come home and play it or just stare at it.

 

Never played a TV but I looking forward to it. My next guitar purchase will probably be a J45TV to keep the 'Bird company.

 

I look forward to reading about your progress in catching the right 'Bird.

 

FMA

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Buying my 2010 Hummingbird MC is probably the best thing I've done for myself in years. I too work a tough job and one of the things that keeps me going is knowing that at the end of the shift I get to come home and play it or just stare at it.

 

Never played a TV but I looking forward to it. My next guitar purchase will probably be a J45TV to keep the 'Bird company.

 

I look forward to reading about your progress in catching the right 'Bird.

 

FMA

 

Very interesting. That is exactly what I've been thinking I need to acquire to complement my H'Bird. 2 TVs.

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QUOTE =Sorry Pitt. Yes, you're right of course... I should have double checked, I have trouble keeping the GC versions straight.

Their H'bire is square shoulder, but has a narrower waist and is a long neck, with no actual iconic pickguard design.

So - we agree - it's not a real H'bird. = End Quote

 

Quote= As usual the 'Bird Pro gets a bashing for not being "real". There have been so many incarnations of Hummingbirds, why is there only one considered as "real" by purists.

If Gibson see fit to name them Hummingbirds why shouldn't everyone else? Of course it's different to the first model but I love mine. =END QUOTE

 

Interesting perspective on the HB Pro. I think if Gibson did not want them regarded as "real" Hummingbirds they would have called them Hummingbird Faux

 

I have finally been fortunate enough to buy a Gibson Hummingbird Heritage Cherry Burst, but I sure do like the HB Pro too.

Came real close to buying one because I like the sound and the burst. Might still do it when I get a little extra dough.

 

There are so many iterations of so many classic guitars through the years - That's what makes it fun and affordable for all.

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As usual the 'Bird Pro gets a bashing for not being "real". There have been so many incarnations of Hummingbirds, why is there only one considered as "real" by purists.

If Gibson see fit to name them Hummingbirds why shouldn't everyone else? Of course it's different to the first model but I love mine.

 

 

A "real" Hummingbird is whatever Gibson says it is.

 

But all are modern takes on a classic. This may be what would make a "purist" tread lightly around them. In the end it is all about how we judge guitars.

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