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LPguitarman

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You know when you see the guitar player hold the guitar body and bend the neck to get a little dive bombing? I saw a guy do that last week and it was probably the first time I ever actually heard the dive bomb. I'm sure he had to put a lot of pressure on to get the sound.

 

My questions are, what does that do to the neck? Is the truss rod strong enough to keep the neck in the correct position? How does the guitar stay in tune afterwards? BTW, I would never do that to my Les Paul.

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ive seen Slash and Page do that several times..

 

but they can afford it if the worst happens... I cant :)

Yes, he did it to his Explorer. Maybe he has a real flexible neck. I definetely heard the dive bomb. Since he is the lead guitarist, I usually keep my eyes glued to the lead guitarist's hands. I was only about 30 feet from the stage with an unobstructed view.

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a cute parlor trick I spose, but based on the 40+ years I've been in this game..

 

I would classify this as "not recommended"

 

And also not worth it. Probably 99% of the audience is wondering what the hell that's all about.

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ive seen Slash and Page do that several times..

 

but they can afford it if the worst happens... I cant :)

 

And Slash has broken a neck doing it, he actually did snap an LP neck and hit him in the face, he had the guitar repaired and he says is more solid than ever.

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I've had guitars I've had to be careful with or they'd get "neck bend," but I've never done it by intent for reasons noted above.

 

The point about Fender bolt-ons is, I guess, another reason I'm not particularly a Fender "board guitar" fan.

 

m

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On a Fender you can re-tighten the neck, on a Gibson I would not do it but...I don't care if somebody else does it.

 

Also, I need to actually play guitar better before I start doing any acrobatics.

I don't really do it to get super tricky, but if you strum out an e minor and do it it sounds pretty surftastic

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I don't really do it to get super tricky, but if you strum out an e minor and do it it sounds pretty surftastic

 

It's a cool way to warble some open harmonic clusters (12th, 7th, 5th fret etc.) too. And I've occasionally pulled it back the other way until the strings fret out against the neck. This makes a great noise if you got some gain on! [thumbup]

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If it's good enough for Randy...

 

He was my first experience with neck bending. Hearing that slight dive on the harmonics in Crazy Train confused me to no end. He was playing a Les Paul Custom! How did he do it? Then I saw a video, and it all became clear...

 

-Ryan

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On a Fender you can re-tighten the neck, on a Gibson I would not do it but...I don't care if somebody else does it.

 

Also, I need to actually play guitar better before I start doing any acrobatics.

What about when someone else does it to your Gibson? Many years ago I lent my ES 347 to a friend whom I admired as a player for a backyard party. He was rocking away and I was impressed to see and hear my guitar, and then all of a sudden, he's pushing the neck forward and I'm hearing Floyd Rose-like dive bombs. I freaked and interrupted the song to retrieve my guitar. Lesson learned - I never lent it out again.

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I've been doing that to all of my guitars since I started playing. If you are pushing or pulling hard enough to damage it you probably don't care if it breaks, because you probably have enough money to replace it or you have six other guitars at the end of six roadies arms waiting for you to use. It doesn't hurt them. It's a cute trick, makes some good sounds if pull back while fretting up by the nut, as per Surfpup up there. I've never actually divebombed by pushing, but have slightly flatted, it works good with a Leslie'd up Hammond going on over there. It's nice for harmonics too.

 

rct

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a cute parlor trick I spose, but based on the 40+ years I've been in this game..

 

I would classify this as "not recommended"

 

I couldn't agree more... I literally cringe every time I see a player do this on a YouTube vid or on TV... My heart goes into panic mode and I get a little sick feeling in the pit of my stomach... If I want to dive-bomb I'll buy an axe with a whammy bar!

 

On my Strats I always "bottomed-out" the bridge so it could only dive and not rise for vibrato because I had such trouble keeping them in tune and keeping strings on them and if I broke a string it would go all out of tune FUBAR. So I bottomed-out the bridge so if I broke a string the other strings would remain at least in the ballpark of in-tune...

 

I've had guitars I've had to be careful with or they'd get "neck bend," but I've never done it by intent for reasons noted above.

 

The point about Fender bolt-ons is, I guess, another reason I'm not particularly a Fender "board guitar" fan.

 

m

 

I suspect a Fender neck pocket is a little weak for this... It just doesn't seem like a good idea to me!

 

Having said that watching Tommy Emmanuel vids on YouTube; he does it all the time with an acoustic with a set neck...

 

He does it mostly to be cute emulating more serious players that do it with more real intent, but he does it alot and even crosses over into doing it purposely to add to the melody of a tune...

 

I still cringe...

 

 

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