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Advice on first gibson acoustic


SonofSkywalker

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Hello everyone I'm about to go out and try a J15 & J35 this will be my first Gibson purchase (I currently own a Taylor 414ce) I was wondering if you had any advice or anything I need to look out for ?

I can't make my mind up looking at both the specs which to choose so I'm going with a completely open mind and see which one I like the best

I love my Taylor but as I have small hands I like the idea of the shorter scale on the J's

Any thoughts or advice would be great

Thanks

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Read this board for a while. Whatever model you choose, be sure to check the bridge plate underneath. Play as many as you can and decide what how much you're willing to spend. Some cheaper guitars -- J15, J35 -- have been getting higher ratings than many other higher end models (at least for the money).

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My advice is after you've had the J-35 or J-15 home for awhile, polish the Taylor, change strings, sit her up on a stand with a little bit of dramatic light breaking across her lower bout. After a couple of days in the house with a J-XX, she's gonna need to feel pretty.

 

P

 

msp_lol.gifmsp_lol.gif

 

Well said!

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My advice is after you've had the J-35 or J-15 home for awhile, polish the Taylor, change strings, sit her up on a stand with a little bit of dramatic light breaking across her lower bout. After a couple of days in the house with a J-XX, she's gonna need to feel pretty.

 

P

That about sums it up...lol!
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Gibson's slope-shoulder D is a venerable design, with enough response to fingerpick and enough oomph to flatpick. Between the two, the '35 is going to have a chunker neck which a lot of us prefer but which may take some getting used to after a Taylor. And the 15's walnut back and sides are going to less 'ringy' than the 3's mahogany --mmv on that.

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Looking at specs is not going to tell you a thing about sound. But they are a great place to start if you are concerned about playability such as nut width, neck profile and string spread at the bridge. I would imagine these will come far more into play in terms of you having, as you say, small hands than scale.

 

Opinions - well you know the old saying about those. We buy what works for us and sometimes you will go through a bunch of guitars before you hit on the guitar that has everything just right. It is all part of the learning process.

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Thanks for all the replies [thumbup]

Some very interesting points and thoughts I must admit when I bought my Taylor it was pretty much a rushed impulse buy and in hindsight it probably wasn't the best purchase I find the neck a bit to wide and scale length to long in the first few frets for my small hands

 

But as you say you live and learn I should have tried way more guitars before I bought the Taylor but as I've only been playing for a year or so I didn't really know any better

 

I'm really looking forward to trying out some Gibson J's this week I probably won't have the luxury of playing loads and picking from a few as there's only 1 gibson dealer where I live. I could order online but it might be taking a leap of faith on whether I get a good guitar

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Read this board for a while. Whatever model you choose, be sure to check the bridge plate underneath. Play as many as you can and decide what how much you're willing to spend. Some cheaper guitars -- J15, J35 -- have been getting higher ratings than many other higher end models (at least for the money).

 

I'm curious Smurfbird, what do you need to check for on the bridge plate, is there something specific we need to be looking out for?

 

 

Ian

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Two weeks ago I bought my first Gibson as well. I went to the few shops in my area and played everything in my price range I was looking at a few Gibsons and Martins and played two J45s, two J35s, J15, Martin OM-21, Martin D-18, and a 1972 Martin D-28. Of those I picked a J35. The J15 was a close second but I liked the bigger neck and more aggressive sound of the J35. As others have said sometimes you have to try a few. Both of the J45s were pretty mediocre.

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Definitely get a Gibson. Each one has its own personality. Each one is different from the next. You and I can each buy a Hummingbird and the two guitars will not be identical, and that's because they're Gibsons. Mine will be like me and yours will be like you. Gibsons ARE NOT cut out of a cookie cutter like so many of their competitors, although many of their competitors are also very well-made guitars. I'm not knocking Gibson's competitors, I'm just saying Gibsons are different and they're made to be that way. And don't get too caught-up in all of the talk about "consistency." I personally don't want my Gibson to be built exactly like, sound exactly like, feel exactly like everyone else's. Gibsons consistently run "good, better, best." Only you can make "your" decision on what the best one is.

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Well after playing several Gibson J series in local guitar store today and after taking time with each one. I listened to each of them with me playing and the guy in the store played them for a while then took some time out to weigh up which I liked the best....

The result I'm now the proud owner of a brand new Gibson J35 [thumbup]

 

I've had some time today to play it at home and it sounds even sweeter than in the store

It looks amazing sounds great and I love the overall feel of it, the action is a little higher than I like but the tech at the store said play it for a couple of weeks let it settle to its new home then take it in to the store and he'll adjust the saddle and lower the action.

 

And as mentioned in one of the earlier replies my Taylor is polished and hanging on the wall for now...

The J35 just seems sweeter sounding more dynamic and more responsive I'm truly won over

Thanks for all the advice guys [biggrin]

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Congrats! Enjoy your new guitar. I hope you have it for many years and it grows along with you as a player. We all know how much fun it is to get a new guitar. But we should all appreciate the joy of bonding with an instrument and enjoying it through the many years and changes.

 

That said, don't be surprised if you find yourself curious about another model. That's normal, too.

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