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Help! Mold growing on & in cases


C.C

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Hi guys,

 

Looks like I'm on an extended stay on this tropical island.

 

Unfortunately, the climate here seems to be bad for my guitars, and especially my cases.

 

I'd had a TKL Custom Shop case shipped over here some time in 2012 (had a thread about it in here somewhere), and every couple weeks I'd find mold starting to grow on the tolex and I'd have to wipe it off.

 

Now, this Custom Shop case was used to house a 1974 Les Paul Custom and I don't play it often, didn't touch it since beginning of this year. A couple weeks back when I moved the '74 into a period-correct early-70s case, I found that the interior red lining of the Custom Shop case was moldy at many spots [blink]

 

There is nothing I can do about the climate here, but I was hoping there's something I can do to the case and/or something I could place inside the case to prevent mold. Appreciate any advice I can get on this guys, thanks :)

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have you tried leaving it open to fresh air and give it sunshine on sunny days? maybe get in side with a vacuum cleaner a few times a month if it's that bad..

 

if you use anything like febreeze or lysol (both do eliminate mold) but you'd prolly want, make sure it's really dried out well before storing the guitar in there. God knows what that stuff would do for the finish.

 

maybe others can share their experiences too.

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I work at a marina and we have a product called "damp rid" but there are many brands.

 

They are basically like the little packets of silca gel that come in boxes of electronics to keep them dry.

 

These are bigger to keep moisture out of boat living areas.

 

 

Not sure how to clean what you have now, but these packets may prevent it in the future

 

NHTom

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I work at a marina and we have a product called "damp rid" but there are many brands.

 

They are basically like the little packets of silca gel that come in boxes of electronics to keep them dry.

 

These are bigger to keep moisture out of boat living areas.

 

 

Not sure how to clean what you have now, but these packets may prevent it in the future

 

NHTom

[thumbup] In my opinion, using silica gel is the way to go. It doesn't anything like drying down to zero but will create an equilibrium moisture content, depending on time, environment and dry mass of silica gel. Moreover, it can be regenerated in a baking oven time after time. 120...150°C for ten minutes are sufficient and won't hurt the paper bag. There is no loss of efficiency, so the number of cycles is practically unlimited.

 

I think it would be best to put two or four 1 oz bags into the guitar case, and to regenerate half of them alternatingly every few days, i. e. one respectively two, and put them back into the case. This should keep the humidity within the case somewhat below that around it.

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Brought both cases out for some sun, and here's a shot of the interior of the Custom Shop case.

 

6zswUzO.jpg

 

Check out that moldy goodness both top and bottom [crying]

 

The '74 has been shifted to the period-correct case now and I have no use for this case at the moment, but if I were to pick up another Les Paul in the future and it doesn't come with a case, how do I clean this lining so its safe to store another guitar in there without damaging the finish?

 

Appreciate if anyone can advise on this, thanks guys.

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Guest Farnsbarns

Go to a cigar suppliers website and order some humidier fluid. It has a mould inhibiter. Using a spray bottle give the case a misting of it, then let it dry out. You might need to repeat this a few times but you'll end up with a mold proof case eventually. Keep silica gel in there too, mainly because if it's humid enough to mould the case your guitar isn't going to be too happy either.

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Google it Bro.

 

All kinds of info on the net.

With varying degrees of effect.

Bleach kills mold but you can imagine what it would do to the dye.

 

Learn about what makes it grow and learn about what stops it.

 

A little education will go a long way.

It's not rocket science.

It is very manageable if you know what makes it tick.

Even for your climate.

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