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Riffster

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Hmm...where do I start and how do I proceed?

 

OK;

 

Your album listing (side, track number) will be listed along with a code letter.

Some of these have quite a bit of info and some, I'm afraid to say, won't have anything.

 

Side One.

1. Can't help.

2. Can't help.

3. A.

4. A.

5. Can't help.

6. B.

7. A. B.

8. C.

 

Side Two.

1. Can't help.

2. D. E.

3. F.

4. C. D. E.

5. D. G.

6. C. D.

7. Can't help.

8. Can't help.

 

OK?

Now for my Albums;

 

A. 'The Eternal Fire of Jimi Hendrix with Curtis Knight' - Hallmark Records SHM - 732. Stereo. London 1971.

Sleeve-notes; "Throughout these recordings, although there were other musicians present, Jimi re-recorded all parts himself, through the process of over-dubbing, thus eliminating all other performances with the exception of the drummer." ....and, I'd suggest, Curtis Knight on vocals....

Recorded July/Aug 1967.

 

B. 'Looking Back with Jimi Hendrix' - Ember Records EMB 3428. "Stereo Enhanced Mono" (!). London (licensed from PPX USA) 1974.

The two tracks you list were recorded in 1968. Curtis Knight wrote some of the other material on the Ember disc so it's a fair guess he was in there, somewhere.

 

C. 'Jimi Hendrix - Super Star' - Armando Curcio, Editore. Rome, Italy. UnDated but approx 1981. Stereo.

There is a 12 page booklet/insert. Unfortunately it's in Italian!

A couple of oddities; according to the liner notes 'Voice..Wind' was written by 'Hitson / Brantley' and 'Sweet Thang' by 'Brantley / Lamont'.

On other albums (see D, G) I have a 'John Brantley' listed as being the producer. Trying to get some royalties as a songwriter, perhaps?

More about Hitson later...

 

D. 'For Real - Jimi Hendrix' - DJM Records DJD 28011. Mono. 1975.

Recorded at Abtone Recording Studios, New York, 1966. Produced by John Brantley and Lee Moses. Engineer : Abe Steinberg.

Personell;

Jimi Hendrix : Guitar and Vocals.

Lonnie Youngblood : Saxophone and Vocals.

Herman Hitson : Guitar.

Lee Moses : Guitar.

'Unknown' : Drums.

 

E. 'Jimi Hendrix - Rare Hendrix' - Trip Records TLP-9500. Stereo.

All info exactly as (D.) but with the date 'June 10 1966' as an added detail.

Master engraved '5 / 16 / 1972'.

 

F. 'Jimi Hendrix - In Concert' - Springboard International Records SPB - 4031. New Jersey, USA. Stereo.

No further details except '8/75' on the master disc.

 

G. 'Roots of Hendrix' - Trip Records TLP-9501 {cf (E.)} Stereo.

Notes as per (E.) with the additional sleeve liner note interview with Brantley who states that the tracks were;

"...recorded in the Spring and Summer of 1966...(and)...sometime after these sides (were recorded) Jimi split for England...".

 

Hope that helps a bit.

 

P.

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Pippy & Riffster,

 

Riffster that's a score man. $5.99 !

 

Where WAS the Score? Grimey's /Tubbs?

 

Nuya ? [sneaky]

 

Inquring mind want's to know,next time we're in Sumner County.[smile]

 

Pipp, you constantly amaze me with your depth of musical knowledge sir.

 

Years ago gifted all my Jimi stuff to our son in New Mexico.

 

BUT,

 

I did burn this compilation,all early, have you two ever heard of this : Jimi Hendrix- The Authentic PPX studio recordings 1967. 6 cd set.

 

Vol.1-Get that feeling.

 

Vol.2- Flashing.

 

Vol.3-Ballad of Jimi.

 

Vol.4-Live at George's club.

 

Vol.5- Something on your mind.

 

Vol.6-On the killing floor

 

A goodly amount of material immediately post Isley Brother I believe.. Then a couple Beatles tunes..Paul was a big booster / fan of Jimi's when he arrived in the U.K. as well you both are aware.

 

X

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I've got:

 

A. 'The Eternal Fire of Jimi Hendrix with Curtis Knight' - Hallmark Records SHM - 732. Stereo. London 1971.

Sleeve-notes; "Throughout these recordings, although there were other musicians present, Jimi re-recorded all parts himself, through the process of over-dubbing, thus eliminating all other performances with the exception of the drummer." ....and, I'd suggest, Curtis Knight on vocals....

Recorded July/Aug 1967.

 

Bought it years and years ago - early signs of the Hendrix genius if I might say so...

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These recordings have been issued and re-issued many times under many different titles.

There are pre-Experience live recordings with Curtis Knight which include an early version of 'Drivin' South'; 'Strange Things' is also with Knight and was the title of a studio LP which included 'The Ballad Of Jimi' in which his early death is supposedly predicted.

(Edit) The studio tracks are known as the PPX - Ed Chalpin recordings....Hendrix returned to the U.S.A. to play the 1967 Monterey Festival and after this triumph he happened to visit Chalpin's PPX studios - invited by Curtis Knight I think - and was persuaded to play. On the original tapes he can clearly be heard saying more than once "you can't use my name on this ok?"

 

He lived to regret doing his old buddy a favour.

 

The ensuing legal battles are outlined quite well in the Harry Shapiro/Caesar Glebbeek biography which is still a very good reference and well worth reading, as is Noel Redding's book 'Are You Experienced' which contains an illuminating chapter entitled 'Yameta or bust'.

The 'Band Of Gypsys' LP was originally released to pay off Ed Chalpin who as I understand it had won in the American courts but made the mistake of travelling to England to continue the action, and was then humiliated and absolutely vilified by the high court judge who threw his case out - no merit whatsoever.

 

The state of play now is that these recordings are pretty much 'public domain' - all the principals are dead. The Experience Hendrix organisation holds all the Experience copyrights but the Michael Jeffrey estate, still overseen by Jeffrey's ex-lawyer AFAIK, continues to release archive recordings and CDs in Europe with impunity as Experience Hendrix doesn't seem to have the taste (or funds) for a long and protracted lawsuit in the English courts.

 

IMO the whole history of the legal wrangles over and around the Hendrix estate is thoroughly unpleasant, immoral and absolutely sickening.

The Dylan line "money doesn't talk, it swears" really does apply here.

It is also well worth reading Leon Hendrix's autobiography.

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The state of play now is that these recordings are pretty much 'public domain' - all the principals are dead. The Experience Hendrix organisation holds all the Experience copyrights but the Michael Jeffrey estate, still overseen by Jeffrey's ex-lawyer AFAIK, continues to release archive recordings and CDs in Europe with impunity as Experience Hendrix doesn't seem to have the taste (or funds) for a long and protracted lawsuit in the English courts.

 

IMO the whole history of the legal wrangles over and around the Hendrix estate is thoroughly unpleasant, immoral and absolutely sickening.

The Dylan line "money doesn't talk, it swears" really does apply here.

It is also well worth reading Leon Hendrix's autobiography.

 

Yes, I didn't know a thing about it untill I read Sharon Lawrence's book.

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Pippy & Riffster,

 

Riffster that's a score man. $5.99 !

 

Where WAS the Score? Grimey's /Tubbs?

 

Nuya ? [sneaky]

 

Inquring mind want's to know,next time we're in Sumner County.[smile]

 

 

 

Grimey's, they expanded to Grimey's Too next door where they placed the used stuff and added a coffee shop.

 

The funny thing about Grimey's is that used "Classic Rock" records are cheaper because the crowd that frequents this place is more hip (and well, hipsters).

 

No chance in hell that The Great Escape or Phonoluxe would have had this record for any less than $20.

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These recordings have been issued and re-issued many times under many different titles.

There are pre-Experience live recordings with Curtis Knight which include an early version of "Drivin' South"

 

I was always disappointed to note that Hendrix would try to lay claim to that number, when we find out it is Albert Collins' "Thaw Out."

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyDbSiwaB5k

 

 

I've never seen Albert Collins get ANY recognition for this origination other than after-the-fact lip-service by Hendrix fans that pass it off as the "basis" for the song as if mention long after the money was made and the credit was given is meaningful!

 

I guess I must confess it's one of my favorite Hendrix tunes, but I've been terribly disappointed I've never seen Albert Collins mentioned on any Hendrix album containing that song...

 

I guess drug abuse clearly lets one be an @$$hole...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUMLlQByiRM

 

 

Sure, it's his own arrangement of the song, and it goes far and above what Albert started, but it's still originally Alberts!

 

Something along the lines of original song by Albert Collins with original arrangement/re-composition by Jimi Hendrix would have sufficed...

 

I've read some history that indicates Albert was performing this song, possibly as early as 1958...

 

I'm not so sure Mr. Hendrix wasn't just as guilty of such infractions as those we are disappointed-in for doing it to Jimi and his legacy these days...

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Please excuse bump - I just want to correct myself; Hendrix signed a few recording contracts prior to becoming famous, but (crucially) had signed one with Ed Chalpin before meeting Chas Chandler. So that's how the PPX recordings came about.

 

@Jimimac - The 1st recording of "Drivin' South" is with Curtis Knight in 1965. The plagiarization or adaptation of other artists' material is common enough in all forms of music for there to be that saying that 'some artists copy but great artists steal' - something like that isn't it? I'm not trying to defend or deny what you say, it's clearly audible. But there are many similar or far worse examples from earlier or later in rock, blues, jazz and folk. And everyone goes to the same well. Hendrix never 'officially' recorded "Drivin' South" and the recordings were not released in his lifetime so you can only speculate whether or not he would have credited Albert Collins in any way.

 

The following quote is from p.308 of 'Miles - The Autobiography' by Miles Davis and Quincy Troupe, on the subject of Jimi's death:

"...Man, that's a hell of a way to go. What I didn't understand is why nobody told him not to mix alcohol and sleeping pills. That s**t is deadly and had already killed Dorothy Dandridge, Marilyn Monroe, my good friend Dorothy Kilgallen, and Tommy Dorsey. Jimi's death upset me because he was so young and had so much ahead of him."

 

Regards to all.

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Grimey's, they expanded to Grimey's Too next door where they placed the used stuff and added a coffee shop.

 

The funny thing about Grimey's is that used "Classic Rock" records are cheaper because the crowd that frequents this place is more hip (and well, hipsters).

 

No chance in hell that The Great Escape or Phonoluxe would have had this record for any less than $20.

 

Juicy tidbit Riff sir,tanx a bunch.

 

Grimey's it is..

 

[thumbup] X

 

 

 

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@Jimimac - The 1st recording of "Drivin' South" is with Curtis Knight in 1965. The plagiarization or adaptation of other artists' material is common enough in all forms of music for there to be that saying that 'some artists copy but great artists steal' - something like that isn't it? I'm not trying to defend or deny what you say, it's clearly audible. But there are many similar or far worse examples from earlier or later in rock, blues, jazz and folk. And everyone goes to the same well. Hendrix never 'officially' recorded "Drivin' South" and the recordings were not released in his lifetime so you can only speculate whether or not he would have credited Albert Collins in any way.

 

I didn't know he never released it during his lifetime... That does make a difference!

 

I hope he would have given the credit where credit is due...

 

Yes such things have been going on since music has been recorded! Hell all the original Blues stuff recorded in the 1920's was probably adaptations of other artists work prior...

 

It does make a difference though that he didn't release it as one of his songs... Glad to know that now.

 

I do however still believe that the self-indulgence of such drug use/abuse coupled with the general brain damage that drugs do to one does allow people to do @$$hole things that they wouldn't have done were it not for the drugs...

 

Which is part of what has allowed so many to tragically over-indulge to their own death...

 

Sad and at the same time self-induced...

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