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What is the purpose of the tail piece?


Alouf

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Floating tail piece? Don't think the stop bar can really be considered floating but you're right it should be secured. Tone Pros makes stop bars and TOM's that can be secured and Gibson uses them in a few models. Should be standard equipment IMO.

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"I was wondering what is the purpose of the floating tail piece on the LPs"

 

I think he means it's not fixed. It was designed to be adjustable to cater for different bridge heights. Sustain will be better if the stop bar is tightened down onto the body, but the string angle is usually too steep. This causes the strings to rub against the bridge, which wears away the plating and puts a side-loadng on the bridge. This is why you see strings wrapped over the stop bar, although this makes a worse mess of the plating...

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It doesn't bother me at all. In fact I'm quite a vintage-****. And that aside, I change strings one at a time, so I only remove all the strings at once when I'm gonna clean her up or do some set-up.

 

I had 2 Epis with tonePros locking tailpiece and bridges and it was ok. My gibby has the ol abr-1 and I think it's ok too.

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I'm just careful when I change strings but thats it, I never care for it being lose... I can see why people rise it or why they wrap the strings around, what I dont get is, if lots of people do this and gibson knows, then why havent they donde anything about it in 50 years? They could design a new tailpiece (aftermarket or as an option for certain models) that can be tightened to the body without the strings touching the edge of the bridge.

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They could design a new tailpiece (aftermarket or as an option for certain models) that can be tightened to the body without the strings touching the edge of the bridge.

 

You can accomplish this by getting a pair of 5/16-24 setscrews at the hardware store and putting them in the inserts underneath the tailpiece studs. The tailpiece studs tighten down against the setscrews and everything is nice and tight just like the tailpiece was tight against the body. Now however you can keep it raised up higher so the strings don't hit the back of the bridge and you can have a little fun adjusting it up and down until you're happy.

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You can accomplish this by getting a pair of 5/16-24 setscrews at the hardware store and putting them in the inserts underneath the tailpiece studs. The tailpiece studs tighten down against the setscrews and everything is nice and tight just like the tailpiece was tight against the body. Now however you can keep it raised up higher so the strings don't hit the back of the bridge and you can have a little fun adjusting it up and down until you're happy.

 

 

Thanks man, sounds interesting.

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the tailpiece was also originally marketed as a tension adjustement device. if you keep the tailpiece down then it gives a sharper angle for the string over the bridge. this makes the string feel tighter. if you raise the TP and give the string a shallow angle over the bridge, then the string will feel like it is more slinky.

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Hey' date='

 

 

I was wondering what is the purpose of the floating tail piece on the LPs. Does it have any purpose, or is it aesthetics only?

 

And why isn't it secured to the guitar?

 

[/quote'] because if they changed it for any reason, everyone would run screaming

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You can accomplish this by getting a pair of 5/16-24 setscrews at the hardware store and putting them in the inserts underneath the tailpiece studs. The tailpiece studs tighten down against the setscrews and everything is nice and tight just like the tailpiece was tight against the body. Now however you can keep it raised up higher so the strings don't hit the back of the bridge and you can have a little fun adjusting it up and down until you're happy.

 

Simply brilliant! I love it. Did you ever think about working for NASA???

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By floating, I meant un-secured, sorry for the confusion.

 

So, I can lower the tail piece to make it flush and "fixed" with the body? and will the increased tension on the string damage the bridge?

 

I still don't understand the role of it mainly. I thought at the beginning it was meant to adjust string action.

 

If you lower it, then you need to detune that string to stay in tune, so there is less stress. I am thinking if you lower it, you will have no different on stress on the string.

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the tailpiece was also originally marketed as a tension adjustement device. if you keep the tailpiece down then it gives a sharper angle for the string over the bridge. this makes the string feel tighter. if you raise the TP and give the string a shallow angle over the bridge' date=' then the string will feel like it is more slinky.[/quote']

 

+1.

 

I screwed mine all the way down. Strings felt too tight. Didn't have that much of an impact on sustain. I ended up increasing the height of tail piece, which make the strings feel more "slinky."

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+1.

 

I screwed mine all the way down. Strings felt too tight. Didn't have that much of an impact on sustain. I ended up increasing the height of tail piece' date=' which make the strings feel more "slinky."[/quote']

 

Mine didn't feel much different.

 

But if you increased the stress on the string, by lowering the tail piece, you have to relief the tension in order to bring that string back in tune. So the string is back to original tension.

 

Or am I missing something?

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Mine didn't feel much different.

 

But if you increased the stress on the string' date=' by lowering the tail piece, you have to relief the tension in order to bring that string back in tune. So the string is back to original tension.

 

Or am I missing something?[/quote']

 

I don't know the physics of it...but that it how it felt. I had been playing it for a few months with the tail screwed down. When I raised it, the strings felts a little slinkier. It was noticeable.

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Mine didn't feel much different.

 

But if you increased the stress on the string' date=' by lowering the tail piece, you have to relief the tension in order to bring that string back in tune. So the string is back to original tension.

 

Or am I missing something?[/quote']

 

No, you got it as it will change the string tension. And it does not change intonation so you're good to go there. Just re-tune and move on.

 

BTW, if you're messing with the stop bar you should really de-tune the stings anyway until you get it set to where you want it.

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