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mgrasso

New Elitists for the Japanese Market only

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I really do not understand this at all.

I contacted Gibson about the new Elitist 1964 Texan (FT-79) about availability, cost and retailers selling the model.

My reply was:

Hello Mark,

 

The Elitist 1964 Texan (FT-79) model is an exclusive model which will only be available in the Japanese market. Thanks.

Best Regards,

 

Gibson Customer Service

1-800-4GIBSON

I am guessing that this will be true for the 1966 Riviera Custom.

 

I'm not known for ranting on this site, but i guess there's always a first. (Plus I am a huge "Buy Epiphone" purchaser, new and used)

Here goes:

Why list it on the American website?

Why have a "BUY NOW" button that lists my local shops?

Why have the first high end Epiphone models (especially an acoustic) not available anywhere but Japan.

Why only give make available only the Casino and the Dwight Trash (Casino). (Love the Casino, but with so many variations, let's move on to other models)

Why not state "Exclusive to Japan" in the listing.

Why not make these available for ordering anywhere in the world? (It is an international company)

 

I missed out on the first run Elitist J-200, Texans and McCartney reissue that came out and have been waiting for something like this.

I would buy a first run of this quality even though I know they are not looking for just a dozen or so buyers in the US.

But I cannot see them selling more in Japan than they would in the US and especially the UK.

 

Rant Over.

 

The way we eat up the Masterbilts, there has to be a US market for a high end Epiphone acoustics and electrics. (I own three and will probably buy more older models and would love new original Epiphone models in the line-up)

 

Looks like I'll have to wait to see if the Masterbilt AJ-45 materializes.

 

I know this should be posted in the Acoustic forum, but i decided to put this here because of the recent Elitist posts.

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Ahhh what a bummer. I was giving real thought to that Riv.

 

To play devil's advocate, I guess I understand the business perspective. It's sort of analogous to how a band can be really big in the UK, but really struggle touring the US, because even if they sell out New York and LA, there are a lot of stops in between. If Epi released these throughout the US, they might sell pretty well, but there will be many that idle in guitar centers, scratch and dented by tire-kickers, and surrounded by studio gibsons at the same price point.

 

It would be interesting if Epi followed suit with Gibson, and had offerings you could only obtain from five-star dealers, like they did with the 62 wilshire reissues. These masterbilts certainly deserve a chance at the US market, but find themselves caught in a weird zone of marketability.

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I agree. There should be some avenue for us die-hard Epiphone fans to order either from the company or a single dealer that could supply us with their product.

 

Just getting over some medical problems and my wife said I need to treat myself to a new guitar.

The Elitist 64 Texan was my choice and I did not want to miss out on this as I did the J-200.

 

I really want a high end Epiphone.

Thank god for my Masterbilts, and they do satisfy me.

I can afford Gibsons, Martins and Taylors, but I am an Epiphone fan and choose to buy their products. (My small attempt at guitar snobberymsp_tongue.gif)

Hopefully the moderators or someone that can relay this message and will get this in front of the president.

They seem to have listened to us in the past.

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The bottom line is always going to be whether or not a given instrument will produce enough profit margin. Primary considerations would most likely include the eventual price point, potential units sold, and similarly priced Gibson units already manufactured in the US.

 

Imho, if Gibson believed they would garner enough profit to make it worthwhile, we'd see them here, just like we continue to see the Elitist Casino.

 

I too am disappointed. Got lucky earlier this year upon finding an '05 McCartney Texan & will certainly be hanging onto it, as Terada-Japan clearly builds some of the best instruments in the world. It's unfortunate to not have access to their new models.

 

In conjunction with this topic, have to say the Epiphone marketing arm is just goofy as heck. One never knows when a particular Epiphone model may or may not truly surface. I'm sure a good chunk of this problem stems from the utilization of multiple factories around the world - but still, they've got lots of room for improvement!

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To me, it seems strange that a company would limit the distribution of it's products...but that's just merolleyes.gifmsp_crying.gifmellow.gifmsp_glare.gif

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This is nothing new for Epiphone. They've been doing this type of thing for years. Though it seems to me that they could at least release a few hundred units to areas outside of Japan. A low number with limited distribution would be sure to sell out - here or in Canada or the EU. Its not like we havent been begging for new Elitist models for years. And just when you think Epiphone is giving us what we are all asking for, they pull the "Not So Fast..." card.

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It does seem ironic in light of the fact that the 1966 Riviera was an American guitar made in American and sold in America, and this historic reissue will only be sold to the Japanese. I wonder if the 1966 Riviera was for the American market "only".

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msp_tongue.gif

1409332615[/url]' post='1558229']

This is nothing new for Epiphone. They've been doing this type of thing for years. Though it seems to me that they could at least release a few hundred units to areas outside of Japan. A low number with limited distribution would be sure to sell out - here or in Canada or the EU. Its not like we havent been begging for new Elitist models for years. And just when you think Epiphone is giving us what we are all asking for, they pull the "Not So Fast..." card.

 

I agree. Why not provide a limited run available to select retailers (retailer)?

The easiest way to test the market If it sells well, they have an indicator. If not, sell them in Japan.

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evidently their analysts have concluded that presently the Japanese have more disposable income than others......also, there's no mass shipping/freight cost on MIJ/SIJ items.

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My best advice would be to keep checking eBay and hope to find an international seller willing to ship one. I bought a Japan-only ESP with a 24 3/4" neck scale and Floyd Rose on eBay this year. The shipping from Japan was $80 USD if I remember correctly. You can find them if you really want one and are patient enough. Good luck!

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I got a wonderful MIJ for Japan SG via fleabay. It worked out perfectly. But if Epiphone doesn't want us Epiphone lovers to be duped by fakes on fleabay, then they really shouldn't leave us to fleabay for grey market guitars. That doesn't serve anyone but counterfeiters. With the explosion of crooked Epiphone offerings on the grey market, why provide free advertising to the scoundrels?

 

I currently have 16 Epiphones (of 22 guitars), but am a fraction of a drop in the Epiphone bucket. Let's face it. There is no tail wagging the dog in the big scheme of things. If Epiphone makes something I want and makes it available to me through proper channels, I am likely to bite. If they don't make it available to me, I'll get a Godin or an Eastman. Sounds like a win-win and a lose-lose to me.

 

But why announce coveted guitars on their English language website as being available when they know they aren't? Does their PR person attend the weekly meetings?

 

Fifty years ago, I was delighted to buy a Kalamazoo Gibson and a Kalamazoo Epiphone. Today, I'm not eligible to buy a Japanese Epiphone and have no idea how to acquire a Korean Epiphone.

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Don`t give up yet guys, I am pretty sure that Gibson/Epiphone will see the error of their ways, and ship some of these guitars our way. Besides where is the market in Japan for a Riviera 66 re-issue, there is no Beatles or big name connection!!

 

On second thoughts how big was Lou Reed over there?

 

Steve.

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The Ltd. Ed. Elitist Texan has a narrow 1.56" nut width which wouldn't work for me. I prefer a 1.75" width on an acoustic guitar and most acoustics I see either have that width or 1.68".

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Disappointed but not surprised.

 

If you know how anal the Japanese are then it makes sense. Many vintage American guitars started going to Japan (buying and taking home) in the 90s.

 

They are the ones who forced Gibson to bring back a correct spec J160E, not the standard one they sell now.

 

Not surprised the correct spec models are going to the Japanese market.

 

If we would stop buying non spec correct stuff here then they would be forced to sell the same thing to us. We do not and accept what we are given so like I said not surprised.

 

Pretty much our own fault for accepting/buying lower quality not correct stuff.

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We buy what we like and most of us here don't get bogged down by minor specs that were the norm back in the day but no longer are. We want our cake and we want to eat it, to. Most players today want guitars that look very much like something from long ago, but feel and play the way we expect them to in this day and age. With Epiphone, we get that for a ridiculously affordable price.

 

That being what it is, I don't really see the point of saying no to someone who is willing to pay for all costs associated with buying and shipping an instrument intended for a different part of the world.

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The Ltd. Ed. Elitist Texan has a narrow 1.56" nut width which wouldn't work for me.

I would strongly suspect that the 1.56" listing for the nut width is a misprint, and should have read 1.65".

 

Terada has used a listed width of 1.625" on a number of instruments in the past.

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I would strongly suspect that the 1.56" listing for the nut width is a misprint, and should have read 1.65".

 

Terada has used a listed width of 1.625" on a number of instruments in the past.

I dunno; the nut width of 1.56" appears on both the Specifications and Hardware pages

 

http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Acoustic/Ltd-Ed-Elitist-1964-Texan.aspx

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We buy what we like and most of us here don't get bogged down by minor specs that were the norm back in the day but no longer are. We want our cake and we want to eat it, to. Most players today want guitars that look very much like something from long ago, but feel and play the way we expect them to in this day and age. With Epiphone, we get that for a ridiculously affordable price.

 

That being what it is, I don't really see the point of saying no to someone who is willing to pay for all costs associated with buying and shipping an instrument intended for a different part of the world.

 

 

I know when I buy an Epiphone LP, SG, EJ160E (or other Gibson clone) I am not getting the same thing. I am getting a close affordable version and that is fine with me and a good value for the money.

 

I only have the problem with Epiphone specific guitars that should be correct or at least offer a tier like Fender, a low cost Casino then then a spec correct one.

 

Most 60s guitars that I have played and own today are the ones most want the new ones to play and feel the same in this day and age not the other way around.

 

Sorry the Casino was not offered with Grovers and I'm not buying a new one to change them for that price. If I am going to spend Gibson money then I expect a guitar that is correct in the first place and needs nothing changed.

 

I own Gibsons and would spend Gibson money for a correct Casino, Texan, Riviera etc. Problem is they are not offered so I can't buy one.

 

I know we both own IB Texan's and I do like mine, had or if this one becomes available to us in the US I will be selling mine and buying this one.

 

The only way to get a real Epiphone Texan now is to find a used one.

 

I think we are not offed these guitars because we are willing to accept and buy almost there versions at lower prices.

 

The Japanese on the other hand have shown they will not buy almost correct things and demand and get what sells in their market.

 

I am to blame too as I bought 2 IB Texans had I not bought any or most of us not bought one, Epiphone might have been forced to offer us this guitar also.

 

Epiphone is only following a proven business model of what sells in what market and they are in business to make money.

 

I would not cost Epiphone much to add a batch of Texan's or 1966 Riviera's to the same shipping container bringing the Elitist Casinos here.

 

I would guess their marketing department for the US figured they would not sell and we are willing to keep buying IB Texans so why no new Elitists for us.

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Sorry the Casino was not offered with Grovers and I'm not buying a new one to change them for that price. If I am going to spend Gibson money then I expect a guitar that is correct in the first place and needs nothing changed.

I own Gibsons and would spend Gibson money for a correct Casino, Texan, Riviera etc. Problem is they are not offered so I can't buy one.

We all have certain criteria in our minds that stands out. I can understand your position, but personally find it to be a moot point.

 

In my mind, every attempt to reissue a "golden era" instrument is simply an approximation. The real deals were built in the Kalamazoo factory, with wood available at that time & utilizing somewhat different techniques of construction. Montana, Memphis, & Nashville all build great guitars, and so does Terada. They stand on their own merits, and I don't need them to follow every golden era spec to a tea. It's a nice feature when they do get close, but so what? It's still a guitar built in a different factory with different equipment, wood sourced from different parts of the world, different specs under the hood (such as Montana's locater holes & plugs in the bridge & fingerboard), etc.

 

So bottom line for me is this: A great guitar is a great guitar, wherever you find it. If it happens to look a lot like my favorite vintage pieces, it may hold even more appeal. But am I going to let Grover tuners vs Klusons keep me from owning a stellar instrument?

 

Absolutely not.

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In my mind, every attempt to reissue a "golden era" instrument is simply an approximation. The real deals were built in the Kalamazoo factory, with wood available at that time & utilizing somewhat different techniques of construction. Montana, Memphis, & Nashville all build great guitars, and so does Terada. They stand on their own merits, and I don't need them to follow every golden era spec to a tea. It's a nice feature when they do get close, but so what? It's still a guitar built in a different factory with different equipment, wood sourced from different parts of the world, different specs under the hood (such as Montana's locater holes & plugs in the bridge & fingerboard), etc.

 

So bottom line for me is this: A great guitar is a great guitar, wherever you find it. If it happens to look a lot like my favorite vintage pieces, it may hold even more appeal. But am I going to let Grover tuners vs Klusons keep me from owning a stellar instrument?

 

Absolutely not.

 

 

You make a very valid point Bobouz. Having owned an original 62 Texan, as well as a 2004 Terada made Macca re-issue, I`ve found they shared nothing in common apart from the looks. The way both guitars were constructed added up to two totally different sounding instruments, both with their own merits.

 

My once owned 64 Gibson ES-330 felt to the touch way different to the John Lennon 65 re-issue 1171#/1965# I also owned. There is a precision in the newer instruments, that seems to make them a little souless in comparison.

 

Having said all that I still would like to get my hands on those two new Elitist`s.

 

Steve.

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