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gary wilson

Guitar lessons online need help

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Hi Gary,

There are many online guitar lessons available, but I think the best by far is Justin Guitar. Justin's an Aussie living in London (I think)and he'll teach you everything from beginner to advanced. His lessons are endorsed by Brian May, and are free (but make a contribution if you can afford).

 

Link:

http://www.justinguitar.com/

 

Good luck,

Ian

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Hello,

 

I am a beginner in Guitar and taking online guitar lessons so can you tell me some good links where I can learn guitar.

 

...................................

 

best beginner guitar

[/quote

 

 

 

Jamplay.com is a very good site for players of all genres and abilities. It is the most complete and thorough teaching website I have found. It has a monthly fee of 19.95, but I think you can still get a month to check it out at half price. In my opinion it's well worth looking into.

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A good advice would be to always like - or better - really like what you play.

 

No boring exercises or tiring rounds. No song is too simple as long as you want to learn it.

 

Imagine you'll soon be able to perform a tune or 2 at a dinner party or by the bonfire next summer.

 

This will be candy enough reach to level 1. And not until level 1 are you able to see if next step is worth it.

 

Good luck -

 

 

 

 

 

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A good advice would be to always like - or better - really like what you play.

 

No boring exercises or tiring rounds. No song is too simple as long as you want to learn it.

 

Imagine you'll soon be able to perform a tune or 2 at a dinner party or by the bonfire next summer.

 

This will be candy enough reach to level 1. And not until level 1 are you able to see if next step is worth it.

 

Good luck -

 

I agree with this big style , next best thing is playing with people with same taste.

 

lessons are of course very useful amongst all the fun. But don't turn it into Monday morning physics class

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Hello,

 

I am a beginner in Guitar and taking online guitar lessons so can you tell me some good links where I can learn guitar.

 

...................................

 

best beginner guitar

 

Check out the DVD study course by Steve Krenz at http://www.LearnAndMaster.com.

 

Gibson Skills House is a good resource for specific guitar topics http://www2.gibson.com/Lessons/Skills-House.aspx

 

 

 

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This is the answer. Nothing better on the web.

 

Hi Gary,

There are many online guitar lessons available, but I think the best by far is Justin Guitar. Justin's an Aussie living in London (I think)and he'll teach you everything from beginner to advanced. His lessons are endorsed by Brian May, and are free (but make a contribution if you can afford).

 

Link:

http://www.justinguitar.com/

 

Good luck,

Ian

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The way I taught myself to play was by purchasing a chord book, and then after learning a handful of the most popular chords, started looking online for free tablature for the songs I loved and wanted to play. Success for me was when I was able to start stringing a few chords together, and making the same sounds I had heard my musical heroes play on AM/FM back in the 70's as a young boy. I would have never kept at it by just practicing the kind of stuff they teach beginners. I needed to hear the songs I loved coming out of my guitar, even if it was small parts and not the entire thing. Youtube was a huge help, too. Just watching somebody play a song helped me figure it out. Good luck.

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I would be interested to see the results of a 'double blind' experiment with 2 people starting lessons at the same time - 1 with online lessons and another with a real life teacher.

 

My old teacher had a way of looking at me that needed no words or no physical violence or hissy fits or any of that......but you could tell that he was just plain disappointed that I hadn't done enough homework even though I had practiced that scale 900,000 times during the previous week. Humans respond to the fear of humiliation by 'bucking up' , but how will these indicators and feedbacks happen with online lessons unless someone is extremely well self disciplined?

 

I love the online and digital lessons, don't get me wrong, but I think a real teacher is more help, especially at the beginning. There is just much more of everything and even some sidetracks and distractions that open new doors...eg: the teacher said once: 'Do you know what this is?' Huh, Nup!.....a bottleneck slide......

 

 

BluesKing777.

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Check out the DVD study course by Steve Krenz at http://www.LearnAndMaster.com.

 

Gibson Skills House is a good resource for specific guitar topics http://www2.gibson.c...ills-House.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

I just received the LearnAndMaster and so far, I think it's a good deal. I took lessons for a year and then my instructor left the music store. The second instructor was really talented but I just wasn't getting it. So, I decided to go with the Steve Krenz course. It's a great way to learn at your own pace. I am glad I had my on hands instructor for a year though.

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I agree with this big style , next best thing is playing with people with same taste.

 

lessons are of course very useful amongst all the fun. But don't turn it into Monday morning physics class

 

Agree - you need to mix 'fun' with 'discipline'. Not many take up guitar hoping it will be tedious, onerous or depressing!

Since many have already given you some online sources - which was your actual request, here's some other considerations you may or may not have thought about..

You need to think a bit about what you want - short term and long term. Some issues: Do you want to learn to read music? Do you like acoustic or plan to move quickly to electric - which begs the question what kind of music do you want to play? And, do you want to play for your own enjoyment, or to play for others? If the latter - Why? To fit in? Some of these answers lead to solo types of learning, some to learning with a group. The answers will let you answer other questions like how much time and money are you willing to invest in this? And how soon do you want 'results'? Teaching yourself to play will take MUCH longer and you will inevitably wind up with engrained bad habits. On line is good - you can rewind and replay as many times as it takes. A human teacher can repeat like the internet, but explain different ways focusing on your actual difficulty. And, of course, part of the program should be fun. "Stairway to Heaven" maybe your favorite song - but you are not going to be able to play it in a recognizable form. G'Luck.

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No boring exercises or tiring rounds. No song is too simple as long as you want to learn it.

 

 

 

Ain't that the truth. I cannot imagine practicing scales and modes over and over again. Then again, I do tend to be somewhat lacking when it comes to self-discipline.

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There's an excellent point about a need to first determine one's goals.

 

When I started, it was to be able to "play guitar." Period. It was the folkie era and that helped because everybody and their cousin was playing one kind of folk instrument or another, and some were extending that into bluegrass and blues - sometimes concurrently.

 

I'd played a teeeny bit of piano and some trumpet, so got what I still consider the very best general guitar primer, the "Folksinger's guitar guide." And a folkie songbook that had chord charts.

 

So basically it was a start of root chord formation, then working to best switch among those chords, then right hand technique to maintain timing... Those all are basics regardless of style.

 

I'd say that I've achieved my goal in the sense that I can play a lotta different types of stuff in a lotta different modes of getting music outa a guitar.

 

I'd also say I did not achieve my goal because I realize that regardless of playing some of the material, I'm no Segovia, nor Joe Pass, nor Kessel, nor Doc Watson, nor BB or a batch of folks in even more styles than mentioned. I can play a bit like some of them. But ain't gonna be a Chet Atkins who pretty much can do a lotta stuff in a lotta styles far better than I might even imagine as something I might accomplish. Yet it's a goal.

 

What I can do is play a bit of a batch of styles well enough not to be embarrassed in most cases unless I do something stupid. I have some skills and, with a deficit of desired talent, I just have to keep going working to improve those skills. I also figure that one is better off comparing oneself to those who have demonstrated both talent and skill.

 

I've yet not come even close to reaching the skills I seek, largely because I lack the talent. But I'm still capable of improving this or that, I'm still on the path of learning "guitar."

 

Frankly I'm certain I'll croak long before I have it all. I'll nevertheless not stop trying.

 

So... good luck. My goal remains unchanged: To learn to play guitar.

 

m

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There's an excellent point about a need to first determine one's goals.

 

 

So... good luck. My goal remains unchanged: To learn to play guitar.

 

m

 

 

 

 

That's the crux of it!

 

 

And just learning one little fraction of what you want could take 95 lifetimes.

 

 

But on we march.... and we would be hard pushed to say we ever have nothing to do as guitarists....like NEVER. And when we are exhausted with playing the thing, we can record it, video it, and Ha Ha Ha, photograph it, then polish it, fix it, shave it, stretch it a bit, break it and even put a big hole in it....and after we have driven all the wives, husbands, girlfriends, boyfriends, friends and relatives and workmates and guitar salespeople, and anyone with an ear, to tears with our "guitar this blah, blah", what can we do then? Join some forums!

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

 

Edit: And by the now, chances are the OP has tried the beast, hurt his fingers, given up the thing and moved on to building Adirondack furniture or.....

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<chortle>

 

As for your last comment...

 

They heard the breeze in the trees

Singing weird melodies

And they made that the start, the start of the blues

 

And from a jail came the wail

Of a down-hearted frail

And they played that

As part of the blues

 

From a whippoorwill

Way up on a hill

They took a new note

Pushed it through a horn

Until it was worn

Into a blue note

 

And then they nursed it

They rehearsed it

And then sent out that news

That the Southland gave birth to the blues

 

m

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Oh, that's the nice song by that Elton chap, no, oh sorry, wrong John of the that's why we....(kidding).

 

 

I like variety in the download lessons - have to keep the grey bits interested or it gets monotonous, but also leads to the common complaint known as 'Bitus Offus Morus Than Cannus Chewith'

 

Hard not to dissipate energies, but I bought some Stefan stuff: Roots of Robert Johnson, Not Necessarily Celtic, Bert Jaench and Skip James. And I concurrently still going through the truly wonderful Understanding DADGAD book by Doug Young because I generally failed at a previous lesson with jazz in DADs and blues in DADs and went back to the start....

 

Cool fun but! Though a couple of lessons were a bit of a waste of cash because I have been playing that stuff for 250 years, but it is good to get another perspective.....

 

 

So in a few months, I shall peel off a tune or 2 and you will think: 'What's that he is playing? Is that an Indian jig or is it a Moroccan/Irish/Swedish fiddle tune?'

 

 

BluesKing777.

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MIlod, Yes. Agree.... of course. And THANKS for reminding me - "The Folksingers Guitar Guide" was my 'Yoda". I loved that softcover book. Wore it out. Wonder what ever happened to it? Alan Lomax' "Folk Songs of North America" was my other 'go to' tool. Thank!

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Forty...

 

My softcover guitar guide was given to somebody just starting into pickin' back in the late '60s, early '70s.

 

OTOH, my hardcover Lomax has been so much used that far too many of the pages are loose.

 

I think a few copies at least of the folksinger's guitar guide are still available on Amazon.

 

Thing is, it covered so much material and explained the concepts so well...

 

m

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Forty...

 

My softcover guitar guide was given to somebody just starting into pickin' back in the late '60s, early '70s.

 

OTOH, my hardcover Lomax has been so much used that far too many of the pages are loose.

 

I think a few copies at least of the folksinger's guitar guide are still available on Amazon.

 

Thing is, it covered so much material and explained the concepts so well...

 

m

 

 

Now that you mention it - I'm thinking I gave my Folk Singers Guitar Guide away too. The Lomax Bible - completely different story. I couldn't afford it - so I renewed it Every 2 weeks at the library for years. I finally bought a used one off Amazon 7 or 8 years ago. Wish I knew whatever happened to my three years worth of "Sing Out" issues ! Probably in a landfill with my baseball cards.

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The way I taught myself to play was by purchasing a chord book, and then after learning a handful of the most popular chords, started looking online for free tablature for the songs I loved and wanted to play. Success for me was when I was able to start stringing a few chords together, and making the same sounds I had heard my musical heroes play on AM/FM back in the 70's as a young boy. I would have never kept at it by just practicing the kind of stuff they teach beginners. I needed to hear the songs I loved coming out of my guitar, even if it was small parts and not the entire thing. Youtube was a huge help, too. Just watching somebody play a song helped me figure it out. Good luck.

 

Thanks for the suggestion and also purchase a chord book for learning a guitar, but I didn't understand that's why I am thinking to go to the online guitar lessons.

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Thanks for the suggestion and also purchase a chord book for learning a guitar, but I didn't understand that's why I am thinking to go to the online guitar lessons.

 

I would tend to agree. I think a basic understanding of individual notes, the concept of different keys, and keeping time provide an important foundation before tackling chords.

Some music books / lessons want to have the student score early successes (immediate gratification?) by being able to play along with some popular songs.

I think the student needs to really want to learn - to have the motivation to keep at it - and learning a few chords might be fine for the first month or two.

To me, chords are combinations of notes - and if you don't have a working knowledge of notes - chords are going to be somewhat elusive once you've mastered "The Cowboy Chords".

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