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I broke my headstock.... What do I do???


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My Gibson J-45 fell off of its stand and landed flat on the floor. When it landed the headstock snapped in two right above the nut on the neck. What should I do to fix this? I have a great guitar repair guy that I have used in the past, but my question is should I (1.) order a totally new neck and headstock piece and have it re-installed or (2.) have my guitar repair guy glue it back?

 

I appreciate your thoughts...

 

I hate that this happened, but I love this guitar and want to fix it right...

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My Gibson J-45 fell off of its stand and landed flat on the floor. When it landed the headstock snapped in two right above the nut on the neck. What should I do to fix this? I have a great guitar repair guy that I have used in the past, but my question is should I (1.) order a totally new neck and headstock piece and have it re-installed or (2.) have my guitar repair guy glue it back?

 

I appreciate your thoughts...

 

I hate that this happened, but I love this guitar and want to fix it right...

So sorry for your mishap, mate. [crying]

 

I think that option (2.) is the way to go as long as a skilled pro guy is recommending it.

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Oooohhhh and ouch - I feel for you. Almost certain there would be a serious price difference between the 2 options.

 

I'm sure you could get a new neck from Bozeman, but it would be a rather expensive and complicated maneuver, , , not least to exchange the old neck.

 

Most people would get the head back in place via a good glue-job.

 

Depending on the specific breach this could be done very smoothly and heal the poor guitar to a degree where you should be able to live with it.

 

Maybe even see it as some sort of personality mark.

 

I'd go for that solution.

 

 

 

 

 

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.

Sorry about your misfortune.

 

A neck/headstock crack or break and repair will diminish the value of the guitar by about 50%. I'm not sure how much a new neck would effect the value of the guitar, but buying one and paying a shop/luthier to remove and replace is expensive. If it was me, I'd have my shop repair it.

 

Let us know how it works out.

 

 

.

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Like everyone says, there is likely to be a huge difference in cost of repair vs. neck replacement. Unless your J-45 is a high-value new model--a TV or Legend, for example--the cost of replacing the neck wouldn't be much less than the cost of a "new" ( used, similar vintage, model, and condition) guitar.

 

Depending on the break, a good repair guy can make the guitar functionally--and often cosmetically--as good as new. However, if you ever sell the guitar, it is important to reveal that the repair has been made, as it will have significant impact on the value of the guitar.

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The 50% devaluation deal is only a guide, an estimate. Not even that. It may be true in a lot of cases, but when it comes down to it, it depends on the guitar, how much it is worth in the first place, and what determines the value in the first place.

 

Sure, the value will be less. But don't just assume 50%.

 

It's a common deal with Gibbys. Just my opinion, but if you play Gibbys close to every day for years, your chances of getting through life without a broken headstock are slim to none.

 

Me, I haven't had one yet. But I expect to. Because everyone I know who plays Gibbys for any significant amount of time has. Not counting those who have a guitar with a repaired headstock. It's more common to guitar players than auto accidents, tax audits, STD's, theft, and has problably surpassed smoking.

 

Only question is how well to have it fixed. Don't know or heard of anyone who has observed a degraded sound as a result.

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Les Pauls are notorious for being prone to the break.

 

If resale is not as important, just repair the neck on the guitar. It is not an expensive repair, and the repair is strong.

 

Russo's in Asbury does this repair all the time and the work is good; I have seen the results. I am not sure I would let a big box shop fix it.

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Les Pauls are notorious for being prone to the break.

 

If resale is not as important, just repair the neck on the guitar. It is not an expensive repair, and the repair is strong.

 

Russo's in Asbury does this repair all the time and the work is good; I have seen the results. I am not sure I would let a big box shop fix it.

I think this is about a J-45.

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My Gibson J-45 fell off of its stand and landed flat on the floor. When it landed the headstock snapped in two right above the nut on the neck. What should I do to fix this? I have a great guitar repair guy that I have used in the past, but my question is should I (1.) order a totally new neck and headstock piece and have it re-installed or (2.) have my guitar repair guy glue it back?

 

I appreciate your thoughts...

 

I hate that this happened, but I love this guitar and want to fix it right...

 

Leave now and go straight to the liquor store and get completely wiped out. Feel sorry for yourself and then proceed to kick yourself in the a$$ for letting this happen. [cursing] I'm sure your guitar had a little help "falling" off the stand! [crying] Maybe now might be a great time to purchase that new Gibby you've always wanted! Next time, after playing, PUT IT IN THE CASE!!!!! BTW, sorry for your loss!

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I've had one repaired ('64 SG back in '70) and you could not tell it. I think I would make sure I find a good luthier that also makes guitars and has all the painting equipment for the touch up or at least question him on how he plans on repairing and touching up. Good luck.

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The 50% devaluation deal is only a guide, an estimate. Not even that. It may be true in a lot of cases, but when it comes down to it, it depends on the guitar, how much it is worth in the first place, and what determines the value in the first place.

 

Sure, the value will be less. But don't just assume 50%.

 

I'm in complete agreement with this. The reality is every repair needs to be assessed on an individual basis and the devaluation starting around 30% for a flawless repair on a desirable instrument and dropping to as little as the value of the parts for a messy amateur repair. A professional repair to a clean break that is hard to spot unless you look for it need not be a complete disaster in terms of resale value and not an issue in terms of your enjoyment of the guitar. A train wreck break, glued up with epoxy and whacking great splines routed into the break area is a difficult thing to come back from.

 

I also think we've come on a long way in terms of what can be done to deal with a nasty break - nowadays there's little that can't be recovered so that the repair looks great and lasts forever as long as the luthier is skilled enough. Have a look at http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html#Luthier (scroll down to the Headstock Breaks section in Structural) for some examples of what can be done.

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I'm in complete agreement with this. The reality is every repair needs to be assessed on an individual basis and the devaluation starting around 30% for a flawless repair on a desirable instrument and dropping to as little as the value of the parts for a messy amateur repair. A professional repair to a clean break that is hard to spot unless you look for it need not be a complete disaster in terms of resale value and not an issue in terms of your enjoyment of the guitar. A train wreck break, glued up with epoxy and whacking great splines routed into the break area is a difficult thing to come back from.

 

I also think we've come on a long way in terms of what can be done to deal with a nasty break - nowadays there's little that can't be recovered so that the repair looks great and lasts forever as long as the luthier is skilled enough. Have a look at http://www.frets.com...st.html#Luthier (scroll down to the Headstock Breaks section in Structural) for some examples of what can be done.

 

This one is on ebay now.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Gibson-J-45-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Cobraburst-888365189208-/261599115927?pt=Guitar&hash=item3ce885ba97

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On lot's of Gibson guitars they sprayed dark paint, black or dark brown, on the headstock and neck heel where it meets the body. If you have a luthier make the repair, he can "disguise" the neck break with the color added and over spray….good as new. By the way, neck breaks reduce the value of guitars by 20-25% if repaired well…..BUT most luthiers tell me that a repaired and glued neck is STRONGER than a regular neck…..go figure…...

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Yes, music123 shouldn't worry about redundancy even if that big, fragmented break is well document in photo, a disclosure in the listing should be there, as well. I have bought guitars with lesser issues disclosed from music123... Not the first time listing for this Cobraburst, and it probably won't be the last. (No, they won't take less for it. Yet).

 

 

To ease the worries of any neck breakers out there, guess it's time to trot out some neck repair video from good ol' Dan Erlewine at StewMac:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DwA56TKWq8

 

and this one, subtitled "Yep, the glue held, & the wood broke":

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kk5Wtlkw5e4

 

 

 

Make sure your repair guy watches, & good luck!

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I would have it repaired! Not re-placed.

 

I have two vintage Gibsons with headstock 'fractures'....not total breaks. One is a '55 LP Jr . I shot some hide glue into crack and reset.....good to go! The other is my '57 CF100E with a minor fracture that I tune to pitch, regardless and have not had a problem. I bought both of these at a discount.....all is good!

 

Rod

 

 

 

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One of my guitars had a 90% headstock break from my foolishly dropping the guitar during a photo session. I took it directly to an athorizrd Gibson repair person who fixed it and told me the break he fixed is now stronger than above or below it and it will never break should I drop it again in that same spot. The break is still visible, but it's become like a war story wound to the guitar. Psychologolically, since I felt the guitar was actually pronounceably dead,since I have gotten it back (9 years ago now) I swear it plays and sounds better than it did before the break! Plus, when jamming with others I often brag about my war wounded Gibson coming back to play and sound better due to its repaired battle scar...meaning I appreciate the guitar more than ever. Since I have had it 40 some years, I couldn't care about its re-sale price from the repair. I care that I still have the guitar in playable condition (better than before the break, to me)!

 

Jazzman Jeff aka QM

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Spread your legs 2 feet apart, bend over and...sorry. Actually, except for the overall valuation of the instrument, a decent luthier can make the repairs and the guitar will be as good as new. I just saw an ES 175 for sale with a headstock repair for $1200.00...interesting. Good luck and don't fret (sorry again).

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