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Touch up paint on my 2013 Rubbed White LPJ


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I have a 2013 Gibson Les Paul LPJ. Rubbed White. On the back edge the paint has decided to rub off a bit. Only about an 1/8" at the edge. I have some white touch up paint that I can dap on the spot with a Q-Tip. Tried this once but the paint just rubs off after awhile. So I ordered a can of ColorTone Aerosol Guitar Lacquer from Stewmac. After I do the paint touch up and let it dry I will spray a little of the lacquer on some foil and use a small sponge brush to apply it to the area. Does that sound the correct way to take care of the spot? I will leave the guitar out of the case and let the area dry for a couple of days. And apply a second coat if needed.

 

Thanks for any suggestions or ideas.

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Hey Greg, in this case... a picture would be worth a thousand words! I am not sure what the "rubbed white" finish that you mention 'is' .....plus..... a one year old guitar should not exhibit any color wear in that amount of time....(in my experience)!

 

So.....I am not clear on 'what' this area looks like or what it is wearing on.....but I would suggest that nitrocellulose lacquer will take more than 'a couple of days' to cure.....from my experience, natural wear is OK....but an ugly repair is awfull!

 

What do you suspect that caused the paint loss? Include a pic of the area.

 

I own a 10 year old sunburst LPJr with no finish loss. Just a little 'finish-hazing' when I haphazardly 'misted it' with bug-spray......NOT cool!

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http://www2.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Les-Paul/Gibson-USA/LPJ.aspx

 

The guitar is listed as rubbed white trans.

 

In any case, a small area about 1/8" long and let than a 1/16" wide has lost some paint. Gibson didn't apply much nitro finish to these guitars to begin with. One of the cost cutting measures.

 

I'm not going to send it back simply because of this. I feel confident I can take care of the touch up myself. The paint job on these guitars is almost like a white wash. The grain of the mahogany is easily visible on the back and sides.

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Saying rubbed white trans means it's intended the way it is in my opinion. I understand your dislike, would want it to have a clear coat, too, but I think they made it for customers desiring instant mojo so to say.

 

I have not expressed any dislike in my above statements. I simply want to attempt preventative maintenance if possible. I have no idea what this instant mojo is you're referring to? If I see an issue and feel I can address it then I will attempt to do so. But I will ask questions if it is something I am ignorant about.

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http://www2.gibson.c...on-USA/LPJ.aspx

 

The guitar is listed as rubbed white trans.

 

In any case, a small area about 1/8" long and let than a 1/16" wide has lost some paint. Gibson didn't apply much nitro finish to these guitars to begin with. One of the cost cutting measures.

 

I'm not going to send it back simply because of this. I feel confident I can take care of the touch up myself. The paint job on these guitars is almost like a white wash. The grain of the mahogany is easily visible on the back and sides.

 

I say "have at it"....and I will not answer any more of your questions. You 'rub' me the wrong way.

 

In this case, I think "preventative maintenance" is...... leave the damn thing alone (paint blemish)... and play it!

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I have a 2013 Gibson Les Paul LPJ. Rubbed White. On the back edge the paint has decided to rub off a bit. Only about an 1/8" at the edge. I have some white touch up paint that I can dap on the spot with a Q-Tip. Tried this once but the paint just rubs off after awhile. So I ordered a can of ColorTone Aerosol Guitar Lacquer from Stewmac. After I do the paint touch up and let it dry I will spray a little of the lacquer on some foil and use a small sponge brush to apply it to the area. Does that sound the correct way to take care of the spot? I will leave the guitar out of the case and let the area dry for a couple of days. And apply a second coat if needed.

 

Thanks for any suggestions or ideas.

 

http://www.pinterest.com/theboomingranny/paint-it-rub-paint-off-repeat/

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Thanks.

 

Those LPJ and SGJ finishes are very thin and probably have no clear coat at all. You will get a lot of wear very easily in a short time. Guys here call any wear "mojo" as in the sentence ; a vintage guitar with a lot of wear has a lot of mojo. Mojo is character and many guys prize wear that occurs naturally. However most guitars take years before they start to show wear and that is due to the clear coat. The LPJ was very affordable because it has no expensive and time-consuming clear coat. IMO, you have two choices in order to fix your problem; clear coat your guitar or sell it and buy a more expensive guitar that already has a clear coat.

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Thanks for being helpful and explaining it. I don't plan on selling it. I was very fortunate to acquire it. It was returned to Sweetwater from someone who obviously couldn't deal with mojo. Their loss was my gain. I figured it cost was due to the finish process as well as lack other value added features. I have no problem with cosmetic issues. I have two SG specials. Both faded cherry. There are nicks and abrasions all over them (i am not the original owner of them but have added my share of Them) and wouldn't trade them for a new SG Standard. I simply wanted to know if my little fix was feasible. I not only like playing but want to learn other processes involved in owning my guitars.

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I have not expressed any dislike in my above statements. I simply want to attempt preventative maintenance if possible. I have no idea what this instant mojo is you're referring to? If I see an issue and feel I can address it then I will attempt to do so. But I will ask questions if it is something I am ignorant about.

[blush] Sorry, I obviously got it wrong when believing you were annoyed by visibility of bare wood.

 

Well, in case you never heard about the mythical thing called mojo, I confess I don't believe in these things, but there are lots of faithful players. Originally meaning a lucky charm or talisman, it refers to wear, dings and dongs here. Guitars partly missing finish and with tarnish on the hardware are considered having "lots of mojo" by some players. This made me use the wording "instant mojo" for a finish which is likely to rub off quickly. Sorry in case I confused you doing so, I beg your pardon for that. :(

 

By the way, even particular control settings may have "mojo" in them. The Beatles made puns of Muddy Waters and "mojo filter" in their "Come Together" lyrics.

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Those LPJ and SGJ finishes are very thin and probably have no clear coat at all. You will get a lot of wear very easily in a short time. Guys here call any wear "mojo" as in the sentence ; a vintage guitar with a lot of wear has a lot of mojo. Mojo is character and many guys prize wear that occurs naturally. However most guitars take years before they start to show wear and that is due to the clear coat. The LPJ was very affordable because it has no expensive and time-consuming clear coat. IMO, you have two choices in order to fix your problem; clear coat your guitar or sell it and buy a more expensive guitar that already has a clear coat.

It actually does have a clear coat. Probably 1 to 1.5 mils.

 

From Gibson's site:

 

LPJ still looks great in your choice of Cherry, Chocolate, Hand-Rubbed Vintage Burst, Hand-Rubbed Transparent White, or, for an extra charge, Goldtop with Brown Satin Back, all in grain-textured nitrocellulose lacquer.

 

In any case I won't fool with it. As long as it continues to sound good then that's all I need.

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It actually does have a clear coat. Probably 1 to 1.5 mils.

 

From Gibson's site:

 

LPJ still looks great in your choice of Cherry, Chocolate, Hand-Rubbed Vintage Burst, Hand-Rubbed Transparent White, or, for an extra charge, Goldtop with Brown Satin Back, all in grain-textured nitrocellulose lacquer.

 

In any case I won't fool with it. As long as it continues to sound good then that's all I need.

One "Worn Ebony" and two "Cherry Vintage Gloss" Gibsons of mine both came with a thin dyed finish and without any clear coat at all. As a matter of course, two "Natural Vintage Gloss" ones came with just a thin clear coat.

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