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Nibless Wonders


SteveFord

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For the 2014 and 2015 models, are the fret edges sharp on these without the nibs to cover them up?

 

I was wondering how I got a mild slice in my finger yesterday and then it dawned on me - no nibs on the guitar I was fooling around with all day yesterday.

 

 

 

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In the late 90's you'da thought there had to be an ambulance parked in front of every Sam Ash in the country so many people were getting lacerated by Gibson frets. eh. Like "tummy cuts" on teles and 34 kilogram slabs of mahogany, nobody ever said playing the guitar was easy. Buck up, Buck. I've probably played thousands of guitars in my life and I've never put one down because of sharp frets. I have a magic file that fixes them before the cuppa coffee is done.

 

rct

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I have a magic file that fixes them before the cuppa coffee is done.

 

rct

Crazy - maybe I have it, too, without even knowing about? After having a cup of coffee, trying guitars is much more fun to me. Perhaps I finally found out why! [biggrin]

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If your frets are that sharp, that guitar needs some humidity. You can get those edges filed down, but you need to address the cause.

[thumbup] Agree. There is no real fret sprout, in fact it always is wood shrinkage from drying out.

 

Living in dry regions may call for deburring or chamfering fret ends. In case a guitar is built at 50% relative humidity, keeping it at 30% RH will require some rework. I think 30% or even 25% RH won't hurt most of today's guitars in the long run, but it's not fine for hide or bone glue, in particular when bonding bracings in hollowbodies.

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For the 2014 and 2015 models, are the fret edges sharp on these without the nibs to cover them up?

 

I was wondering how I got a mild slice in my finger yesterday and then it dawned on me - no nibs on the guitar I was fooling around with all day yesterday.

 

 

 

 

SUE 'EM !

then buy the company, and make all the changes we want. take one for the team Steve.

 

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If your frets are that sharp, that guitar needs some humidity. You can get those edges filed down, but you need to address the cause.

 

I'm not arguing my brutha. But "fret sprout" is usually caused by the fingerboard getting down to where it should be in the moisture content of the wood. It didn't dry enough by the time they fretted it, it lost a percent or three since. Not much, enough to make the fret ends noticeable, which is all we are really talking about, noticeable fret ends under the edge(s) of your hand. It isn't an ongoing thing, and once the fret ends are brought to the edge of the fingerboard enough to make the guitar player happy it's done.

 

Humidity as a significant source of pain for electric guitars is highly overrated. Most homes in most places lived in by most people that mostly have HVAC systems are mostly right where people like it, 45%-55%. If you are comfortable your guitars are, including your expensive Marteens. Sure, winter in some areas like mine can bring dry air via the heater, but some form of humidification of the house, even something as pedestrian as a cup of water in front of the heat vents will usually provide us with the mid range we prefer.

 

If you are comfortable your guitars are, that's the guideline for humidity. Too much isn't good either.

 

rct

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My Korean made Vintage (brand) VS6 (SG copy) has some pretty bad fret-sprout...

 

It does tend to feel shart to the moving hand. The neck on that one is so cantankerous I've named that guitar "Johnny Reb." I bought it on eBay from a guy who was the original buyer who lived in Georgia. (USA) further adding to the Southern Confederacy motif...

 

I've filed the hell out of them with a nice fret file from Stew-mac only to have them sprout a tad more, at least it seemed so...

 

The neck was so setting sensative and varied wildly and I was constantly chasing the truss-rod adjustment until I gave up, raised the action, and relegated it to my slide axe.

 

I strung it heavy and tune it to Open-E.

 

The bridge pickup is so strong on it; Trevor Wilkinson's Seth Lover inspired unpotted PAF type humbucker that I just can't seem to let go of it. It gives such a classic kick-@$$ Southern-Rock tone that is simply to-die-for under the right circumstances that I seem to want to keep it if just for that...

 

Anyway, the fret edges are sharp and uncomfortable ont he unbound neck on that guitar that it bites you pretty good if you try to fret-play it. It hasn't cut me or anything, but it was uncomfortable until I relegated it to slide work...

 

I hope to God that a bound Gibson neck without nibs won't ever do the same!

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It's not humidity as it has been out of the case all Summer with no air conditioning; I guess I'll have to track down the offending fret. It's an ES-335 Satin and it's not the only one to have this issue - maybe the summer intern was given the job of installing the frets on this model, ha, ha.

 

I was holding it at a weird angle on the couch which is why it got me. It's good to hear the new ones have all been smoothed down properly.

 

I wonder if they went with the nibs just for this reason as opposed to simply a distinctive look.

 

------------------------------------------------

 

I've put a call into Jacoby and Meyers and once I've gained control of the company, rest assured, things will return to Ted McCarty standards.

 

No Custom Shop, no Gibson USA, no pre beat up guitars, no looking back to the old glory days, no battery operated gizmos, no fake woods, none of that stuff. Three versions of each guitar: plain, better, fancy, all being made as well as they can be.

 

The glory days will be the current models.

 

How's that strike you?

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My Korean made Vintage (brand) VS6 (SG copy) has some pretty bad fret-sprout...

 

It does tend to feel shart to the moving hand. The neck on that one is so cantankerous I've named that guitar "Johnny Reb." I bought it on eBay from a guy who was the original buyer who lived in Georgia. (USA) further adding to the Southern Confederacy motif...

 

I've filed the hell out of them with a nice fret file from Stew-mac only to have them sprout a tad more, at least it seemed so...

 

The neck was so setting sensative and varied wildly and I was constantly chasing the truss-rod adjustment until I gave up, raised the action, and relegated it to my slide axe.

 

I strung it heavy and tune it to Open-E.

 

The bridge pickup is so strong on it; Trevor Wilkinson's Seth Lover inspired unpotted PAF type humbucker that I just can't seem to let go of it. It gives such a classic kick-@$$ Southern-Rock tone that is simply to-die-for under the right circumstances that I seem to want to keep it if just for that...

 

Anyway, the fret edges are sharp and uncomfortable ont he unbound neck on that guitar that it bites you pretty good if you try to fret-play it. It hasn't cut me or anything, but it was uncomfortable until I relegated it to slide work...

 

I hope to God that a bound Gibson neck without nibs won't ever do the same!

I confirm here what I posted above, no problems with my unbound Gibsons or any other guitar of mine.

 

Sorry for you and your Vintage brand guitar. :( I think this is what happens when using inappropriately treated timbers for manufacturing. No more and no less. Sad, but true. [crying]

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I confirm here what I posted above, no problems with my unbound Gibsons or any other guitar of mine.

 

Sorry for you and your Vintage brand guitar. :( I think this is what happens when using inappropriately treated timbers for manufacturing. No more and no less. Sad, but true. [crying]

 

I wholly agree!

 

I've recounted that I think they finished Johnny-Reb's neck out of a piece of wood that was not cured/seasoned for long enough and it still had a life of it's own under the finish...

 

Like it was too green still when they stained and clear-coated it. It rolls and waves like a living breathing beast! Set it up perfect and in 2 weeks it needs another tweak.

 

Johnny-Reb simply refuses to settle-down!

 

But it's all good, it handles slide duties admirably!

 

I'm glad Gibsons are more properly seasoned before being finished! If I bought a Gibson that did that I'd have a meltdown!!!

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I'm glad Gibsons are more properly seasoned before being finished! If I bought a Gibson that did that I'd have a meltdown!!!

There might be a black sheep in or from every stable. I once owned a Gibson, and not a cheap one, with quite the same neck problem you described on your Vintage brand guitar, and Thomann replaced it with a new one. Please refer to this topic: http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/114066-update-on-neck-curving-back-and-forth/

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