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David L

String winder warning

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Several times in different threads, people have recommended plastic string winders for changing strings. WARNING:These can scratch the edge of your headstock if you have tuners with small knobs. I have a 1992 Collings D2H with small Waverly tuners. After using a winder several times to change strings, I noticed many small circular scratches in the finish on the edge of the headstock. They were caused by the winder going down too far over the knob. Not much can be done now, except warning others. BE WARNED!

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Be careful pulling the pins too. I have seen few guitars with dented up bridges from roughly using a plastic winder/pin puller there too.

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I don't use my string winder for winding strings. I only use it to pull pins. You just have to be a little careful, and exercise a little common sense. If you hear the string winder hitting the headstock, it's going to mark it.

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One can also glue a small piece of cork on the inside of the winecder to shqllow out the depth. I have a couple of those deep ones, and one I have with a cutter on it that is shallow enough, I simply don't use the otheres, probably should just trash them.

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One can also glue a small piece of cork on the inside of the winecder to shqllow out the depth. I have a couple of those deep ones, and one I have with a cutter on it that is shallow enough, I simply don't use the otheres, probably should just trash them.

 

 

That's good advice, as you don't have to modify the pin puller slot if you do it that way.

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It is far too easy and quick to replace strings manually - also known as the "good 'ol way". There, IMO, NO reason to go to the drawer, get a winder, make sure it's working properly - scratch your guitar to save 5 minutes. Changing strings is part of the tactile enjoyment of owning and maintaing a guitar.

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In my earlier playing years I never used string winders. I did all the circular scratches around the pegs with my fingernails. [crying]

 

Meanwhile I happen to perform more gently with fingers and string winders as well. B) And by the way, all of the headstock sides on my bass guitars look fine. [biggrin]

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'warning' ....

capital letters for emphasis?

I totally appreciate warnings to folk who don't have the hindsight of others . I wish I'd heard more when I was learning . but surely string winders won't damage a guitar unless yer using your feet?

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'warning' ....

capital letters for emphasis?

I totally appreciate warnings to folk who don't have the hindsight of others . I wish I'd heard more when I was learning . but surely string winders won't damage a guitar unless yer using your feet?

Some peg and winder combinations work nicely, others lack. Keeping string under tension with one hand and winding with the other hand is not always that easy. It depends on the particular string's run, peghead angle, and nut design, too.

 

Each guitar has her own bells and whistles about stringing. After thirty-three years of playing, I bought my first sixstring guitar ever with machine heads slotted and featuring a center hole. A total different way of restringing. Had this before on a bass guitar only. I live and learn! [biggrin]

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It is far too easy and quick to replace strings manually - also known as the "good 'ol way". There, IMO, NO reason to go to the drawer, get a winder, make sure it's working properly - scratch your guitar to save 5 minutes. Changing strings is part of the tactile enjoyment of owning and maintaing a guitar.

 

 

Yes....for one guitar hand winding is fine....some of us have "a few" guitars and the hand stress when changing strings on a few guitars in an afternoon can hurt.

 

I unfortunately did put a couple circles on a guitar before putting some dense foam into the winder so it was the right depth.

 

Live and learn... but hey there are instruments not museum pieces. The more you use them the more banged up they get.

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It is far too easy and quick to replace strings manually - also known as the "good 'ol way". There, IMO, NO reason to go to the drawer, get a winder, make sure it's working properly - scratch your guitar to save 5 minutes. Changing strings is part of the tactile enjoyment of owning and maintaing a guitar.

There's a string winder in each guitar case of mine, as well as a string cutter, along with two spare sets of strings matching the guitar. One can never know. [biggrin]

 

Yes....for one guitar hand winding is fine....some of us have "a few" guitars and the hand stress when changing strings on a few guitars in an afternoon can hurt.

 

I unfortunately did put a couple circles on a guitar before putting some dense foam into the winder so it was the right depth.

 

Live and learn... but hey there are instruments not museum pieces. The more you use them the more banged up they get.

May depend on guitar build as well like I mentioned in a previous post. I definitely prefer winders for six-in-line tuners with small buttons and slotted center-holed pegs, mostly use them for six-in-line pegs with axial holes, and usually do without on three-left/three-right headstocks. [thumbup]

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yes.

but we all cant afford a man who changes our strings for us.

You have a Butler do it for you !!

 

:D

 

I have about 14 guitars and I change the strings myself. Matter of fact I don't give my guitars to be touched by nobody but me. And I really hate these hand string winders.

If I was an artist that plays on stages every night I'd buy an electrical string winder.

I love to touch the guitar tuners when changing strings. Really. This is a ritual for me ;-)

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Yes....for one guitar hand winding is fine....some of us have "a few" guitars and the hand stress when changing strings on a few guitars in an afternoon can hurt.

 

I usually don't change more than two a day. That takes about 20 minutes. As a musician I guess I feel like a) it's part of the gig and B) It's what guitarists have done for a couple of centuries. Plus, I enjoy the "interaction" with my guitars. I guess if I had to change strings every day ....... no wait.... not even then.

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I usually don't change more than two a day. That takes about 20 minutes. As a musician I guess I feel like a) it's part of the gig and B) It's what guitarists have done for a couple of centuries. Plus, I enjoy the "interaction" with my guitars. I guess if I had to change strings every day ....... no wait.... not even then.

 

you change 2 strings a day ?

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I am still using this cheap plastic winder that I got 40 years ago. Never had any problem with it damaging the guitar.

 

winder.jpg

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I have about 14 guitars and I change the strings myself. Matter of fact I don't give my guitars to be touched by nobody but me. And I really hate these hand string winders.

If I was an artist that plays on stages every night I'd buy an electrical string winder.

I love to touch the guitar tuners when changing strings. Really. This is a ritual for me ;-)

No matter if string change, setup refinement, or an entire new setup, I do myself whatever I'm able to do and avoid having my guitars touched by anybody else.

 

Although I use manual string winders, I totally reject electrical ones. I would never do this to any machine head. [-X Viewing "technicians" use them in videos and workshops is real horror to my eyes in most cases. I wonder if they did the same to guitars of their own.

 

About one year before I started playing guitar, I once saw a guitar shop guy destroying pickup ring threads in the wood of an SG with an electric screwdriver. This is a lesson I will never forget. I only use manual screw drivers and manual string winders since I started.

 

I threaten any sales guy with not buying a guitar in case they use any power tool, and service guys with brute force if they ever dared using one. [angry]

 

I think if stringing and tuning are done by the player oneself, she/he will know that any hurry during stringing will strike back. Considering the entire time until tuning stability is obtained, electrical string winders won't speed up anything.

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Just think of it as a first step to "relicing" the guitar. [wink]

 

I was actually relieved to get the first scratch on my guitars so I could quit worrying about it. I take great care to make sure that nothing happens to my guitars that effect playablity or tone, but there is no way to gig with a guitar the way I do without dinging it up some. I guess all my guitars are players.

 

I also don't own any of the really high end instruments that some of you have and I never sell a guitar or I would do things differently for sure.

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Boyd, that looks like one I use to have. I use them and I just check and no scratches that I can see. I will now be more aware when I use one.

 

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