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decision is made: L 5 CES and a Roland JC 120


skilsaw

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After 3 weeks of humming and hawing and research on the internet(it is the gospel truth isn't it?) I've decided to get my son and L 5 CES and a Roland JC 120 for Christmas. Monday or Tuesday I'll put down a deposit and the store will bring them in.

 

The only fear now is that I'll pay the Gibson price for a Chinese nock-off. To avoid that I'm going through a big music chain that is a Gibson dealer. I haven't heard anything about counterfit amps so there is no fear there.

 

I'm pumped. The way I feel, you would think the guitar is for me!

 

I'll have one of the guitarist/sales staff take it for a test ride just so I know it all works.

 

Even though I am Canadian, I'm glad to be supporting the USA and the United Kingdom (England) with this purchase. We've seen too much manufacturing go off shore.

 

Only 68 days until Christmas. Can't wait!

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Not meaning to sound odd, I mean after all as a parent it's your choice, but buying an L5 CES is like buying the guitar version of a classic Rolls Royce as a car for a teenager!

 

Many guitar makers make quality archtops at a lesser price, such as Peerless for example. Heck, even a used Gibson Herb Ellis would be a great guitar at about 1/5 of the cost of that and it's still a professional instrument as Herb himself would agree. Personally, I could never imagine buying such a high end instrument for a kid!

 

I'm just saying that's all as most great guitarists early instruments were budget ones and they did fine.

 

Surely you work up to a guitar like an ES 175, L5, L4 or Super 400 otherwise a kid will never have any value of the significance of such a fine instrument and/ or money?

 

No offense intended, I just don't understand this approach to things!

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After 3 weeks of humming and hawing and research on the internet(it is the gospel truth isn't it?) I've decided to get my son and L 5 CES and a Roland JC 120 for Christmas. Monday or Tuesday I'll put down a deposit and the store will bring them in.

 

The only fear now is that I'll pay the Gibson price for a Chinese nock-off. To avoid that I'm going through a big music chain that is a Gibson dealer. I haven't heard anything about counterfit amps so there is no fear there.

 

I'm pumped. The way I feel, you would think the guitar is for me!

 

I'll have one of the guitarist/sales staff take it for a test ride just so I know it all works.

 

Even though I am Canadian, I'm glad to be supporting the USA and the United Kingdom (England) with this purchase. We've seen too much manufacturing go off shore.

 

Only 68 days until Christmas. Can't wait!

 

I think that you're a great parent. To buy a great guitar will be something that your son will treasure for ever. However there are many different types of guitars and the choice to some extent depends on what sort of music you want to play and how good you are. So I'd try and and find out what he wants to do and whether he can play or he's about to learn. If you want to spend lots of money and that's not a bad thing then I'd consider an ES335, a good Les Paul or an ES175. If he's just starting out the an L5 is prolly the wrong choice. I own a few L5's and they are my favorite guitar but then again I play jazz in a jazz trio. Many years ago when I played in a blues band I played Les Pauls and would never have played or wanted to use an L5 for that band.

 

It's up to you but there are horses for courses. Worth considering in my humble opinion. Best wishes.

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After 3 weeks of humming and hawing and research on the internet(it is the gospel truth isn't it?) I've decided to get my son and L 5 CES and a Roland JC 120 for Christmas. Monday or Tuesday I'll put down a deposit and the store will bring them in.

 

The only fear now is that I'll pay the Gibson price for a Chinese nock-off. To avoid that I'm going through a big music chain that is a Gibson dealer. I haven't heard anything about counterfit amps so there is no fear there.

 

I'm pumped. The way I feel, you would think the guitar is for me!

 

I'll have one of the guitarist/sales staff take it for a test ride just so I know it all works.

 

Even though I am Canadian, I'm glad to be supporting the USA and the United Kingdom (England) with this purchase. We've seen too much manufacturing go off shore.

 

Only 68 days until Christmas. Can't wait!

 

Just saw your other posts and now realise your son plays jazz. So good luck with youir choice. You are buying a Rolls Royce and they are great guitars. I hope he loves it.

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Not meaning to sound odd, I mean after all as a parent it's your choice, but buying an L5 CES is like buying the guitar version of a classic Rolls Royce as a car for a teenager!

 

Many guitar makers make quality archtops at a lesser price, such as Peerless for example. Heck, even a used Gibson Herb Ellis would be a great guitar at about 1/5 of the cost of that and it's still a professional instrument as Herb himself would agree. Personally, I could never imagine buying such a high end instrument for a kid!

 

I'm just saying that's all as most great guitarists early instruments were budget ones and they did fine.

 

Surely you work up to a guitar like an ES 175, L5, L4 or Super 400 otherwise a kid will never have any value of the significance of such a fine instrument and/ or money?

 

No offense intended, I just don't understand this approach to things!

 

I bought my first L-5C when I was thirteen with money I had earned gigging; singing what we now call doowop and playing a Les Paul goldtop I had bought in a pawn shop through a homemade amp. I owned the L-5C for forty years and I never felt deprived to have skipped all those intermediate steps. It was pretty minty when I sold it, despite it having been owned by a teenager at one time. Having spent every cent I had on it made me greatly appreciate its worth, since I knew how hard I had had to work to earn the money. About six months later I bought a used L-4C because I used the L-5C for acoustic playing and I wanted an archtop for amplified playing. If I had the money I would have bought another L-5C, but the L-4C had the advantage of being a guitar I didn't worry about traveling with or beating up, although I never did do that.

 

Fifty-five years later I still play and gig with Gibson L-5 guitars and I appreciate them every bit as much today as when I bought my first one, shown here (the black mark near the treble f-hole is a slide-scanning defect):

 

620d1d64.jpg

 

In any case, congrats to skilsaw on a great choice of guitar!

 

Danny W.

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Perhaps I misread the topic one the Roland JC-120, but my impression has been your son already owns a Gibson L-5 CES.

 

What guitars did he play up to now, and what guitar(s) does he own at the moment? In my opinion, an L-5 is not an everyday instrument for beating up through regular practicing. Although I consider none of my guitars as a showpiece, I typically do the hard work on cheaper ones and use the higher-class instruments for playing. To be honest, it is mainly about fret wear since I also treat my instruments very carefully when practicing.

 

Does your son have experiences with playing hollowbodies through amps? Accidental feedbacks may cause severe damage to the guitar body. Remember that this trouble gave way to developing solidbodies and semi-hollows. These are the guitar designs I use exclusively, and I play even my only semi-hollow rather seldom.

 

Please get this right, a Gibson L-5 CES is an absolute top-notch guitar for the discerning player, but I seriously doubt that one would use it for practicing or rehearsals regularly. I think most musicians use their highest-class instruments for lifting their playing to a new level when playing live or recording.

 

Just my two cents.

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All good reflections. Particularly the ins and outs of owning the Rolls Royce of guitars.

I'm purchasing it for him as a keepsake, as well as an instrument to play.

 

Thanks.

In my opinion, buying an L-5 CES is definitely a good decision, but I am still curious about what guitar(s) your son is playing at the moment, in particular to get a feel for the step he will have to take.

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Please get this right, a Gibson L-5 CES is an absolute top-notch guitar for the discerning player, but I seriously doubt that one would use it for practicing or rehearsals regularly. I think most musicians use their highest-class instruments for lifting their playing to a new level when playing live or recording.

 

Just my two cents.

 

Good Lord, it's a guitar made for playing, not the Crown Jewels. I rehearse, gig, jam and just play my L-5's around the house. Will that wear them out? Sure, so what? They can be fixed if necessary and made just as new. Why would I (or anyone) want to waste so much playing time on a lesser instrument just to save some wear and tear? Why would I want to save being "lifted to a new level" only for performances? In any case, that's what adrenaline is for. [smile]

 

Rehearsal:

 

IMG_0306_zps1ac50635.jpg

 

Gig:

 

SwingKings6-5-14onstage_zps942b2591.jpeg

 

Danny W.

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Good Lord, it's a guitar made for playing, not the Crown Jewels.

I agree. Taken care of properly, a guitar can last for generations without significant wear (excepting the frets). Danny has already shown us evidence of this. As for me, I usually haven't kept a guitar long enough to see it for myself. ;)

 

I also wouldn't call the L5 the "Rolls Royce" of guitars. They're great, but they're not extremely rare or valuable, relatively speaking. Maybe a "Cadillac" would be more apt. A Rolls Royce might be a D'Angelico or a D'Aquisto (the originals, that is).

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My PC just farted and I lost my reply. It is probably a message from God saying my reply was too long.

 

I'll put a bit of a face on this story.

 

My son is 28 years old and played viola and guitar during his school years. He chose the school Jazz band over Orchestra in his final two years of highschool.

 

Life has not been easy for him. He has been delusional and psychotic off and on for the last 5 years. He is currently medicated and stable. He works 20 hours a week to supplement the social assistance he receives.

 

He started back into music after a hiatus, is taking guitar lessons again, and is looking forward to an "open mic" night at a local folk music coffee house.

 

I asked him if he wanted to get back into Jazz because I believe music is tonic for your mind and spirit. In his early 20's he sold the Ibanez archtop he played in the jazz band. He would like to play jazz again so I went hunting for a guitar for him to treasure. I found the historic L 5.

 

We've discussed it, and he won't sell this one. I will look after it for him if he stops playing again.

 

Maybe this is overkill, but I know what it is like to play with something you love.

 

Thanks again for your interesting feedback and comments.

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My PC just farted and I lost my reply. It is probably a message from God saying my reply was too long.

 

I'll put a bit of a face on this story.

 

My son is 28 years old and played viola and guitar during his school years. He chose the school Jazz band over Orchestra in his final two years of highschool.

 

Life has not been easy for him. He has been delusional and psychotic off and on for the last 5 years. He is currently medicated and stable. He works 20 hours a week to supplement the social assistance he receives.

 

He started back into music after a hiatus, is taking guitar lessons again, and is looking forward to an "open mic" night at a local folk music coffee house.

 

I asked him if he wanted to get back into Jazz because I believe music is tonic for your mind and spirit. In his early 20's he sold the Ibanez archtop he played in the jazz band. He would like to play jazz again so I went hunting for a guitar for him to treasure. I found the historic L 5.

 

We've discussed it, and he won't sell this one. I will look after it for him if he stops playing again.

 

Maybe this is overkill, but I know what it is like to play with something you love.

 

Thanks again for your interesting feedback and comments.

 

Sorry to hear this Skilsaw.

 

He will certainly love the new guitar [smile]

 

What a fantastic thing to do for your son.

 

Best wishes to you both.

 

Cody

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Well, I say if you can afford it, get the Gibson. The Gibson will last forever if it's looked after, long after the imported guitars have bitten the dust, and it will always be worth something, both financially and as that very special gift. Go for it, your son's a very luck lad.

 

Ian

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My PC just farted and I lost my reply. It is probably a message from God saying my reply was too long.

 

I'll put a bit of a face on this story.

 

My son is 28 years old and played viola and guitar during his school years. He chose the school Jazz band over Orchestra in his final two years of highschool.

 

Life has not been easy for him. He has been delusional and psychotic off and on for the last 5 years. He is currently medicated and stable. He works 20 hours a week to supplement the social assistance he receives.

 

He started back into music after a hiatus, is taking guitar lessons again, and is looking forward to an "open mic" night at a local folk music coffee house.

 

I asked him if he wanted to get back into Jazz because I believe music is tonic for your mind and spirit. In his early 20's he sold the Ibanez archtop he played in the jazz band. He would like to play jazz again so I went hunting for a guitar for him to treasure. I found the historic L 5.

 

We've discussed it, and he won't sell this one. I will look after it for him if he stops playing again.

 

Maybe this is overkill, but I know what it is like to play with something you love.

 

Thanks again for your interesting feedback and comments.

I'm so sorry for your son. To my impressions and experiences, it's often the environment making honest and sensible people seem delusional or paranoid. My father-in-law died, and my former employer was sold to a large multinational group. What happened within my then-wife and with my employer, is beyond any reason and all bearing. I was nothing but a scapegoat to my ex-wife, and the management of the Swiss company is downright fascistic.

 

I started a therapy later. My then-therapists tried to make me compliant to all the evil things happening around me. Well, my wife crippled me through deliberately tearing apart a suture two days after a hand surgery, and the company is willing to sacrifice millions of years human life expectancy per year through applying their medicines. Honestly, this is rather the tip of the iceberg than exaggerated.

 

Without discussing all of it further, making my own music and covering music within actually three bands is my personal way of survival. Quoting Sister Sledge here, "I'm Lost In Music", and I can say it's the reason why I'm not lost yet and still am alive. My future is uncertain, but despite of health problems I'm still optimistic and try to support the both of my children.

 

My best wishes to you and your son. Be sure you have all of the understanding and sympathy I am capable of.

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I agree. Taken care of properly, a guitar can last for generations without significant wear (excepting the frets). Danny has already shown us evidence of this. As for me, I usually haven't kept a guitar long enough to see it for myself. ;)

 

I also wouldn't call the L5 the "Rolls Royce" of guitars. They're great, but they're not extremely rare or valuable, relatively speaking. Maybe a "Cadillac" would be more apt. A Rolls Royce might be a D'Angelico or a D'Aquisto (the originals, that is).

 

I agree with both of you.

ALL guitars are made to be played, and all cars are made to be driven.

Of course it's anybody's right and choice to buy a guitar and keep it as a case queen only using it for delicate play once in a while, just as a car can be a garage queen only taken out on sunny days.

 

I don't have big money to purchase very expensive guitars or cars, but what I do own I play and drive.

My oldest guitar is a 1991 Fender American Strat Plus Dlx that I bought new in 1991. Two more years and it'll be vintage. :)

I've played that guitar heavily all these years and played at rehearsals, at home, gigs, studio and it's a players guitar with visible use. But it's far from damaged or in bad shape.

It's actually in fantastic shape and still plays and sounds beautifully. Even the hardware doesn't look it's 23yrs of age.

 

My latest purchase is a new ES335 in satin cherry, and I LOVE this guitar.

The price was a good bit higher than the competition, but there is just something about this guitar that had me pony'ing up the extra dough and to me it's worth it.

This one too will be played extensively. I hope to keep the Strat and ES335 and hand it down to the next generation and hopefully one of my younger nieces or nephews will want to play in the future and play these guitars.

It's a cool thought to know there may still be some physical connection with family even after I'm gone.

Both of these guitars will likely live on much longer than me. :)

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Hi capmaster, Thanks for your reply.

If I've learned one thing in the last few years it is that the person with the diagnosis is not the only one with mental health issues.

 

My salesman is working tomorrow so I'm going into the store to order the guitar and make a downpayment. Balance on delivery. It should arrive in a week or ten days and I'll put it away until Christmas.

 

My son has started guitar lessons again. He played viola for 8 years in school and guitar in the school jazz band for the last years of high school. I hope the new lessons are as motivational as they are technical. When my son was into music before, he was focused, happy and received satisfaction from his effort. That is what I really hope to give him for Christmas.

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Hi capmaster, Thanks for your reply.

If I've learned one thing in the last few years it is that the person with the diagnosis is not the only one with mental health issues.

 

My salesman is working tomorrow so I'm going into the store to order the guitar and make a downpayment. Balance on delivery. It should arrive in a week or ten days and I'll put it away until Christmas.

 

My son has started guitar lessons again. He played viola for 8 years in school and guitar in the school jazz band for the last years of high school. I hope the new lessons are as motivational as they are technical. When my son was into music before, he was focused, happy and received satisfaction from his effort. That is what I really hope to give him for Christmas.

The very best of luck with this, I hope everything works out well for your son and yourself.

 

Regards,

Ian

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