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Metal Saddles


daveinspain

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Just going over some tunes for a new project I'm starting (new band) and all of the sudden, boing….. Popped the B string [bored] Hmmm, just put a new set on a couple weeks ago, maybe longer but still… Broke right at the saddle, where my strings always tend to break. Got me thinking, the stock saddles that come on most Gibsons are the standard metal ones. At times Gibson has used white plastic or whatever material it is, maybe the same stuff they use for the nuts… Any way, strings tend to break at the saddle all the time and not just on one guitar but on all my Les Pauls and other guitars with the ABS style bridge. Maybe the plastic saddles would be better for wear and tear on the strings? Or maybe roller saddles…? My Robot has roller saddles and the strings also break on them as well…

 

Thoughts...

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Guest Farnsbarns

I'm always reminded of this issue when I see posts that include broken strings. I find it weird that I haven't broken a string in way over a decade, probably 15 years. What am I doing that this should be the case? I very rarely use a pick but?....<shrug>

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I'm always reminded of this issue when I see posts that include broken strings. I find it weird that I haven't broken a string in way over a decade, probably 15 years. What am I doing that this should be the case? I very rarely use a pick but?....<shrug>

 

Me either for the most part, however, I change my strings pretty regularly. There's no way that you can leave a set of strings on a guitar for 15 years without breaking one unless you never play it. That is the case for some of my acoustics and my Rickenbacker 12-string.

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Another option is to try topwrapping the strings you keep breaking. Less downward pressure on the saddle, so less chance of breakage.

 

-Ryan

 

Funny you should say that, the string I broke today was top wound... :-k It's usually the high E or B that breaks there and it happens on all my guitars… Must be me #-o

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Yeah im like Farns.. I never break strings.. The last time I remember that happening I was about 19 and in a band...

 

I think it must be to either do with your saddles that need to be filed a bit more or it could just simply be to do with your playing technique... or as others suggested try going up a string gauge...

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Guest Farnsbarns

Me either for the most part, however, I change my strings pretty regularly. There's no way that you can leave a set of strings on a guitar for 15 years without breaking one unless you never play it. That is the case for some of my acoustics and my Rickenbacker 12-string.

 

This is absolutely true. I have a nylon strung acoustic dated to 1969 that I know has the original strings. I never play it and neither did my mother who had it first. Just a keep sake. I do have a set I bought but I kind if like knowing it has the original strings.

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Not an expert, but I think it may have more to do with the players touch, than the equipment. I have always kept the original saddles on my Gibsons, and haven't broken a string for many years. I used to occasionally break one when I used the Ernie Ball Extra Super Slinky strings way back when I think the high E was like .008 or maybe less.

 

Guy I played in a band with for many years used to break strings a lot. He played fender either Strat or Tele. He just had a much stronger heavy handed style of playing than I. [confused]

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I am very heavy handed on both my fretting and strumming hands, so it's me for sure… I have to work on that. The top frets, nearest the nut, have divots on the guitars I play most. One time a friend asked my why i whack the guitar rather than strum it... #-o I'm not as heavy handed as that anymore but I do believe I can improve my dynamics and technique quite a bit more. I may look into the graphite saddles though.

 

Thanks to all, Dave

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Dave - all jokes aside it may well be you. I had the same issue, albeit I was breaking D's and to a lesser extent A's at the saddle. I play mainly rhythm and so the D is vulnerable as it takes a fair bit of the pain on downstrokes (which I mostly play - especially on heavier strumming songs). After trying a couple of things (filing saddles, change saddles etc) my luthier suggested it may well be me - not uncommon he said.

 

I have made 2 changes about a year ago and the problem has ceased altogether:

1. Elixer polyweb 10's

2. lighter gauge pick

Frankly I think its the lighter pick that is entirely responsible but as I changed strings at the same time I'm not 100% sure. I am 100% sure the issue has gone from incredibly frustrating to not even being a consideration now.

Good luck.

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The picture below is graph tech saddles that I use.

The reason I'm using them is because a luthier filed my A string saddle to deep and had to bring the other to their correct height which in turn he had to raise bridge then raise tail piece so string would not hit bridge on the angle.

 

The stop bar was too high off of body and did not look good.

I tried top wrapping and that worked and was able to put stop bar very low.

But I didn't like top wrap scratching my chrome.

So I bought graphtech saddles to get back to factory height.

Great move on my part.They worked so well that I changed the nut also....

bg1_zps19beadfb.jpg

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hp,

 

...looks like you kind of 'backed in' to using GT saddles. They are great, no?

 

I simply do not understand why some people would retain steel saddles, but that's just me.

 

Is that a SigT GT as your Avatar? What year?

 

 

Oh yes...2013 Signature T......

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