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Hummingbird V J-45


gibbyuk

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I have a take on this one - own both.

Two different guitars, no doubt, , , and 2 amazing guitars.

 

I'd say the main difference is that the Bird is more delicate and complex.

 

The Hummingbird has 2 sides to it - in a way it's real simple as if you get acces to some primal core when playing.

But then the mentioned sophisticated sweetness seeps through, and finding the right touch, you'll soon get the mythological nectar drippin'. .

That double-thing makes the square hog a mezmerizing instrument to handle.

 

The J-45 is one of the most praised guitars in the world for a reason.

It was blessed from the beginning it seems - and remains nothing short of fantastic.

It's called the workhorse, but newer incarnations have much more to them than the sittin on a farm fence with a straw in my mouth identity of the early models.

Still the 45 is more down to earth than the Bird - and less vain.

On a concrete level it has thicker highs and slightly lesser 'room'.

Some would say the fuller E and B make it a better finger-picker than the Bird - it's up to you and your styles.

 

If you are satisfied with the 45 Standard, do yourself a favor and ask why you want that H-bird.

Then go out and see if the Birds around meet that other need, , , and beat your black nut slope, which probably is really good.

 

Don't forget to report and please for now tell us why you want the exchange. . .

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To summarize what Em7 is saying in his unique way, you need to play both of them to see which one floats your boat for your style of playing. They are similar, and yet they are different. Defining that difference is not necessarily that simple. I tend to think of the J-45 as a bit more of a rustic creature, and the 'bird as more refined. The J-45 growls. The 'bird sings. The J-45 groans. The 'bird shimmers.

 

Lots of folks give up trying to choose between them, and end up with both. That's not a bad solution.

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I think "E" put it pretty well, although in different words than I would.

 

Both are dread-size, so you know both would be able to have similar volume. Tone to an extent regardless of guitar shape and construction is also dependent on strings and player technique.

 

I'm reminded of a story one guitar teacher-member here told of a recognized excellent Brit classical guitarist-teacher who was impressed with the tone of a student's new guitar when the student was playing - but depressed when it simply had a different response when he played it. Part of that is how one holds and plays the instrument, etc., as well as the fact that "we" hear something different from what's heard by the listener 20 feet away.

 

"We" pickers also, IMHO, tend to put more reliance on the guitar than on ourselves. In the acoustic world, for example - and I've played various steel and nylon instruments for more than 50 years - I'll never make Doc Watson's Gallagher sound like Doc sounded, even doing relatively simple vamping for a vocal. But he'd still sound like Doc Watson even if playing a low-end Epiphone large-body and we'd all be in equivalent awe of his playing and "tone."

 

I have nothing at all against "GAS" (Guitar Acquisition Syndrome) since I have a full-fledged case of it myself. But I think the question always must be whether one is honest with oneself on the motive of a given purchase. No guitar will make you a better musician although one that fits your physical geometry and playing style will make the journey a bit easier. That's true whether electric, acoustic or AE.

 

m

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Em7 as expected nailed it with all the nuances.

 

I guess in the end its a question if you like your tone to be sweeter or a little sour.

 

I would just say that if you can play the True Vintage version of both, as they are in another league, the Hummingbird in particular.

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A simple question. As EU noted - there are many versions of the two iconic models. The standard, original versions are based on mahogany b/s of course.

But - a simple answer, imho : the J45 Rings and the H'Bird Chimes;The J45 Sings Melody and the H'BIrd Harmonizes.

It is wonderful to be fortunate enough to have more than one guitar. But it is a luxury to have a choice sitting within arms reach of 2 iconic Gibson acoustics.

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A simple question. As EU noted - there are many versions of the two iconic models. The standard, original versions are based on mahogany b/s of course.

But - a simple answer, imho : the J45 Rings and the H'Bird Chimes;The J45 Sings Melody and the H'BIrd Harmonizes.

It is wonderful to be fortunate enough to have more than one guitar. But it is a luxury to have a choice sitting within arms reach of 2 iconic Gibson acoustics.

 

I totally agree with you. I own both. The J45 is brighter and with more volume than the hummingbird, so the J45 is better for soloing and the bird for accompanying. In my case, the hummingbird suits better for me. That's why I am selling my J45 in order to finance a J200 or J150.

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Jarvis gives it a shot -

 

 

 

Really good comparison. Shows how the 'bird is a perfect rhythm instrument. Certainly a sweeter voice than the J-45, but's that's not necessarily what you always want. J-45 a little more gutsy, harder around the edges.

 

J-45 growls, hummingbird sings.

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GIbson J-45/ Southern Jumbo = gritty raw power without being over bearing.

 

Gibson Hummingbird+ sweet warm pure tone.

 

I like them both. But the Hummingbird is favorite.

 

If you want that Gibson J-45 sound with a little bit of that Hummingbird Nudie Suit style, get yourself a Southern Jumbo !!

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The bird looks better ( she is like the hot girl at the bar you go home with for a night) Pretty, can sing like a canary.

 

The J 45 is the fat girl you marry, make a life with. A better fit. Great cook, handsome girl, great lungs. Marry the J 45 but Always good to have the bird on the sly though [cool]

 

Do both. Unlike my real life.

 

If you really want to Pimp... Go Dove. That my next girl. Shes the supermodel that will rock your socks off and them cook you a big fat steak!!!

 

That is the only advice I can give you. But I am a hack, so take it all with a grain of salt.

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Especially for Rock. Maybe Nashville. Doesnt rock for me as a folk box (doesnt have that Appalachian clarity or Shaker simplciity) or the blues (has the mids but not the top cut), but mileage may vary as the saying goes.

 

 

The two guitars in the folk-rock group I worked with back in 1970-'71 were a 'bird rhythm, and a D-18 (or D-28: can't remember which) lead. Not a bad combo for that type of music.

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The two guitars in the folk-rock group I worked with back in 1970-'71 were a 'bird rhythm, and a D-18 (or D-28: can't remember which) lead. Not a bad combo for that type of music.

 

Definitely not - and a post like that can't happen without a humble request of a few pics from that glorious era.

 

Of the group of course - and what birth-year for the rhythmic Bird. .

 

 

 

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Definitely not - and a post like that can't happen without a humble request of a few pics from that glorious era.

 

Of the group of course - and what birth-year for the rhythmic Bird. .

 

 

Most of my pics from that era are long gone, and good riddance. You wouldn't want to see me with my long pony tail, long red beard, Indian shirt with silver beads, fuzzy sheepskin vest, striped bell bottoms, and riding boots now, plus the cherryburst version of my J-45, would you ? [biggrin] (Looks a little too close for comfort like Bob Birdwell's photos from the Peter Wheat days.)

 

I wouldn't know the age of those guitars now. I would say early/mid-60's for both. 'Bird was a pretty bright cherryburst Also had RMI electric piano, electric organ (Yamaha, as I recall), and later, drums (not the best call for the music). I ran a home-made eight channel concert mixing board, and we had those bloody great Altec Lansing A-7 speakers. You remember those, don't you? We ran all that kit, three guitars, our suitcases, and four people all across the country in an extended Ford van.

 

Thanks God we were young!

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Most of my pics from that era are long gone, and good riddance. You wouldn't want to see me with my long pony tail, long red beard, Indian shirt with silver beads, fuzzy sheepskin vest, striped bell bottoms, and riding boots now, plus the cherryburst version of my J-45, would you ?

 

A photograph of exactly that would lift my Sunday - especially the original first-wave beads. But silver, , , is that historically correct ,-) , , , it must be.

How did they get silvered, , , and did they come in brass, cobber and gold too.

 

Here's a shot rock photographer H. Diltz posted the other day on FB. It's taken one early morning after being out all nite. Guess most of you recognize the guys on the flanks.

Admit I brought it to the archive for the beads also. . .

 

1967 ~ HenryDiltz.jpg

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