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57 classic question


deelaz

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You can definately use a 57 Classic pickup in either position.

 

When we first invented the Humbucking pickup in the late 50's, there was only one model and it went into both neck and bridge positions. On the other hand, most players now like a "hotter" pickup in the bridge position because the strings vibrate less near the bridge, and thus a weaker signal is generated. So, a hotter pickup will make up for that differnce in volume.

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The '57 Classic is my favorite pickup, for both solos and chunky old-school rock rythms. The ones in my Lifeson ES-355 sound huge! I only wish Gibby would make a set with 4-conductor wiring so I cound drop them into my Les Paul Axcess & still have the coil-splitting feature. The 490s come close, but they don't have the same balanced mids & sparkly highs as the '57s. I will probably replace the Burstbuckers in the LP with 490s until Gibson builds my 4-conductor '57 dream pickups.

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The '57 Classic is my favorite pickup' date=' for both solos and chunky old-school rock rythms. The ones in my Lifeson ES-355 sound huge! I only wish Gibby would make a set with 4-conductor wiring so I cound drop them into my Les Paul Axcess & still have the coil-splitting feature. [/quote']

 

A 9K '57 makes a great bridge pickup. A good guitar repair guy can tap the coils and turn it into a 4-wire fairly easily (a bad one will simply ruin your pickup). Ask Gary Brawer in San Francisco, who does this for some of his clients who use '57's.

 

Don't forget that once you have coil-tapped pickups on your guitar, you can select single coil mode one of several ways: you can have a single push-pull (as I think the Axcess does) installed as one of your tone controls. That will usually tap both pickups at once. Or you can have separate push-pulls installed that will tap each pickup individually. I'm not a fan of push-pulls (having pulled the knob completely off and had it fly into the audience once) and have two miniswitches (one for each pickup) installed on most of my coil-tapped guitars. Besides eliminating the prospect of knob launch at importune times, it allows you to see at a glance where you've got your pickups set.

 

One other option: Ibanez, with their higher-end Artist guitars in the late '70's and early '80's, installed Tri-Sound switches. This pair of three-way miniswitches allowed you to select serial, parallel or single-coil for each pickup. Serial is standard humbucking, and parallel produces a sound somewhere between single coil and full-humbucking. Surprisingly useful.

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