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Gibson vs Rickenbacker


houndman55

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Which one makes the most guitars in America? I read in some random book that claimed that Rickenbacker is currently the largest manufactuere of guitars in the the United States as allegedly other brands outsourced to asia or elsewhere. But I'm pretty sure Gibson makes way more guitars than rickenbacker in a week. Maybe it's because other labels in "the gibson family of brands" like Kramer and Epiphone are indeed made in Asia and therefore counted as a part of Gibsons total output. Can anyone verify?

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Which one makes the most guitars in America? I read in some random book that claimed that Rickenbacker is currently the largest manufactuere of guitars in the the United States as allegedly other brands outsourced to asia or elsewhere. But I'm pretty sure Gibson makes way more guitars than rickenbacker in a week. Maybe it's because other labels in "the gibson family of brands" like Kramer and Epiphone are indeed made in Asia and therefore counted as a part of Gibsons total output. Can anyone verify?

I would have to agree with you on the total output of Gibson, however they should not be counted as being made in the USA. I own two Rics and they are made in the US I have not doubt.

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I agree that not all under the Gibson umbrella should be counted but I would still think Gibson makes more. I think because of the different lines that Gibson makes would out produce Rick, the acoustics and electrics combined. Rickenbacker's product line just seems like it is not as diverse.

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Rickenbacker makes what Rickenbacker customers WANT! The tried and true designs that have stood, and defined their

own test of time. Personally, I think Gibson could take a lesson, from that! But, to each his/her own. And, frankly,

I hope Rickenbacker continues to do what they've always done...make Great Guitars ONLY in America! Being "bigger,"

isn't always better. IMHO, as always.

 

CB

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This really has me wondering now between Gibson, and Rickenbacker, for which one, turns out more American manufactured guitars. I would guess Gibson. The American Rickenbacker basses seem to be more consistent in quality control, at least the ones that I've come in contact with. That's more important to me than numbers.

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What about Fender's U.S output?

 

 

Ian

 

 

Well, I only meant that Rickenbacker is one of the few (maybe the only??) that doesn't have "Asian or Mexican"

(legally made) versions. If it says Rickenbacker, it's only Made In USA! Guitars branded Gibson, are only Made in USA

as well. But, their other company subsidiaries out put is quite varied as to country of manufacture. So, is Fender...even

more so, because the actual "Fender" moniker is not limited to "Made in USA," but is on Asian, Southeast Asian,

and Mexican, built guitars, as well. So...??? [tongue]

 

CB

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Interesting question. I would like to see a link or something as to where the statement came from.

 

If it was a book, It can't really be current info, as it takes time to write and publish.

 

I can see a case where at a certain point in time, like a given year or week, it might be true.

 

Just to be clear: except for an acoustic model here and there (through the years, and in the past), GIBSON has always, by definition, meant "made in the USA". There is no such thing as an overseas-made Gibson. Same as Rickenbacker.

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I can't imagine Ricks being sold in greater numbers than even LP variations from Gibson.

 

I'm with CB also in thinking the Gibson brand only on US-made instruments is a good thing. Both Fender and Martin have guitars with their names on the headstock, but are imports.

 

To me the Rick is kinda a specialty instrument. I played one late '65 through 'much of '66 and, at the time was pretty happy with it. (CB, in retrospect, it was an "F" body, mapleglow, but that's a long, long time ago to recall the exact model. We played what we could get, pretty much.) Stuff happened and it was gone. BTW, back then I and almost everyone else I knew were playing light flatwounds on 6-strings for "rock" type material. In retrospect, I don't think I realized just how narrow the neck was at the nut - but it didn't make much diff because I was doing 90 percent rhythm picking in the band where I used the Rick.

 

OTOH, I can't imagine there not being a Rick market either, even with the narrow nut width.

 

m

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I can't imagine Ricks being sold in greater numbers than even LP variations from Gibson.

 

I'm with CB also in thinking the Gibson brand only on US-made instruments is a good thing. Both Fender and Martin have guitars with their names on the headstock, but are imports.

 

To me the Rick is kinda a specialty instrument. I played one late '65 through 'much of '66 and, at the time was pretty happy with it. (CB, in retrospect, it was an "F" body, mapleglow, but that's a long, long time ago to recall the exact model. We played what we could get, pretty much.) Stuff happened and it was gone. BTW, back then I and almost everyone else I knew were playing light flatwounds on 6-strings for "rock" type material. In retrospect, I don't think I realized just how narrow the neck was at the nut - but it didn't make much diff because I was doing 90 percent rhythm picking in the band where I used the Rick.

 

OTOH, I can't imagine there not being a Rick market either, even with the narrow nut width.

 

m

 

Milod, Do you mean the body had "f" holes, instead of the more common "cat eye" holes they're (more) known for? If so,

it may have been a "Rose Morris" version, of the 330 or 360. Those were commonly for Overseas (specifically England)

distribution, through the Rose Morris agency. But, there were some sold here, as well. Too bad you didn't hang on to

it! [crying][biggrin]

 

CB

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No, the F body had only a single cutaway on the thin-body semi. This particular guitar had cateye cutouts.

 

It was so big and I was so skinny at the time I coulda played nude and covered up with the thing.

 

That also made it possible to dance with a girl on the floor while my long curly-cord allowed.

 

<super grin>

 

Sheesh, that's too @#$% close to 50 years ago. <sigh>

 

m

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No, the F body had only a single cutaway on the thin-body semi. This particular guitar had cateye cutouts.

 

It was so big and I was so skinny at the time I coulda played nude and covered up with the thing.

 

That also made it possible to dance with a girl on the floor while my long curly-cord allowed.

 

<super grin>

 

Sheesh, that's too @#$% close to 50 years ago. <sigh>

 

m

 

 

Something, like this?

http://www.ronsvintage.com/1959%20Rickenbacker%20360F.htm

 

 

CB

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Similar... but this is a heckuva lot fancier. I do recall it had the Rick sound dual outputs; pots on the pickguard.

 

I dug through some of those "googled" bits too... None looked quite like I recall - but I dunno if that's because I'm old and that's half a century ago or if I was really more interested in the fun of playing and ... stuff ... at the time. No, no drugs (that's what led in ways to the band's breakup and aftermath) but just that the guitar brand was to me a lot less important than the pickin'. Gotta figure too I was still basically a folkie/folk bluesie in '65-66 when i wasn't doing a bit of classical or flamenco on the #1 guitar that was a classical.

 

Life's odd at times...

 

I actually got into that band after doing a "folk festival" gig fall of '65 with harmonica and kazoo in 'San Francisco Bay Blues' as I'd done it as a fingerpicker for a cupla years already.

 

m

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To me, the RIC bass is the cat's meow. 4003 or 4001 I think. (Don't know exactly what model is what).

 

If I were going to play bass, that one has this effect on me. I remember as a kid, wondering if I wanted to play bass or guitar, wanting that bass.

 

I would also say, the best sounding bass player I have ever played with used one. I would even venture to say the ones I associate that bass with are often what I think are the best, either in what they play or how they sound.

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Never understood the "Rickenbacker is an 'acquired taste'" or "one trick pony" mindset. WTH???

They're only limited, by the attitude=mindset, or "talent," of the player! I DO understand

that they're not everyone's "cup of tea." But, those previously mentioned "labels" have always

baffled me. :rolleyes:[tongue]

 

CB

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Ric 4003 basses to me, seem to be very temperamental for their sound, as to what amp it's played through. I really like my 4003 going through a Fender Super Bassman head / Ampeg SVT-410HLF cab. A lot of bottom to it, and less trebly clacking sounds.

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1417371549[/url]' post='1596782']

Never understood the "Rickenbacker is an 'acquired taste'" or "one trick pony" mindset. WTH???

They're only limited, by the attitude=mindset, or "talent," of the player! I DO understand

that they're not everyone's "cup of tea." But, those previously mentioned "labels" have always

baffled me. :rolleyes:[tongue]

 

CB

 

For the same reason some people love Gretchs and some don't,

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For the same reason some people love Gretchs and some don't,

 

I understand, that people have different tastes, and needs,

in a guitar..ANY guitar, of ANY brand. But, to say they're

a "one trick pony" is absurd. :rolleyes: Otherwise, there

wouldn't be so many of us here, that have one (or several)

of each brand, knowing full well their strengths and/or

"limitations!"

[tongue]

 

CB

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For the same reason some people love Gretchs and some don't,

I play both Rics and Gretsch thru a Vox AC30 and I just love the way they sound. It's what a couple of guys have said it's all personal taste and needs.

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CB...

 

My take would be that the narrower nut probably plays a role in this, and probably also the guitars with the dual outputs that likely leave a few folks figuring there's something "odd" about the Rick.

 

That said, and I've said before, I think that sometimes guitar players have this strong tendency to go for instruments that are considered typical for the type of music they're playing given what "big names" have mostly been seen playing certain types of guitars. I can't forget an old vid of Joe Pass playing jazz on a Fender Jaguar, for example - and yet most "jazz" players tend to go with the archtops instead. It's kinda odd in ways that Les Paul might be considered more of a jazz/pop player, but the instrument never really caught on with the jazzer and almost didn't catch on with the rockers. And the SG... it's interesting who picked them up as a 24 3/4 shortscale "board" guitar compared to the folks who are into the Fender variations.

 

It's kinda ditto with all the "big box" flattops. Very few pickers will go to the smaller box unless they're doing kinda a Leon Redbone sorta schtick. Yet much of the "on stage" sound of so many of those big flattops never really is heard even it it's an AE plugged in.

 

I don't see any reason why a Rick couldn't be used for about any genre of electric guitar playing other than the narrow nut, especially on the 12 as you yourself have mentioned. OTOH, there were at times a lot of other guitar brands with similarly narrow nut widths, but in another era of playing styles. I think that last may be why they're not perceived as comfortable to play and for whatever reason, bring "not my cup of tea" responses by those not playing the heavy chord rhythms up and down the neck as was once quite popular.

 

Also, since very few folks start on a Rick... I can see where that could be playing a role too. I started on a classical and to this day prefer relatively flat fingerboards - although stuff I've done technically since the '70s tends to let me prefer that kinda 1.7 inch nut over the wider fingerboards as well as narrower ones. Although... I don't recall feeling difficulty in playing that Rick I used circa '65 and '66 with what I was doing with it at the time - and for doing solo material away from the band, I still was using a classical guitar and generally a more "classical style" technique.

 

m

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