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Wetdog

Pre-Gibson Epiphones

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I believe Amos played an Epi Sheraton so it is not a pre-Gibson Epi but was made in Kalamazoo. Fo me, no neck made by Gibson in the 1960s will work. Too flippin skinny.

Early Sheratons were fitted with pre gibson Epiphone necks so in truth he was talking about a true Epiphone neck

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Early Sheratons were fitted with pre gibson Epiphone necks so in truth he was talking about a true Epiphone neck

 

 

So were acoustics like the Texan but my point was I would never refer to a 1958 Texan or a Sheraton as a a pre-Gibson Epi. I do know guys though that went out and bought an Epi Sheraton believing (incorrectly as it later turned out) that was the guitar Amos played on Maria's "Midnight on the Oasis."

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8X7TFZ4K2Y

 

Some one asked for photos. In the audio of this video, the recording is of me playing my 1955 or 56 NY Epiphone FT79. Its the round shouldered guitar in the photos in the video, where the stage is white-lit and I am wearing a plaid shirt. (The square sholdeed guitar I am shown playing in the dark-lit stage photos is a 1994 Gibson Gospel Reissue.)

 

Jazzman Jeff aka QM

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Dear Cliffenstein,

 

Would like to inquire since you are a mastering engineer if you are also an acoustical engineer or know one. I ask this because it would be an interesting experiment to process different acoustic instruments through an oscilloscope to actually scientifically measure tone and the overtones produced. As far as I can tell there is no literature on the subject for acoustic guitars. It would be a difficult experiment to control since there are so many variables. For instance where between the bridge and the fingerboard was the string plucked and how? As we know, the closer to the bridge a string is played the fewer lows sound and more highs. Then there is the type and gauge of string, type of pick, attack angle of the pick etc. If a study were made then it would be a less subjective topic. I would predict that what we are hearing is some mix (like on a mixing board) of the high, mid and low frequencies, which is why we refer to the sound as "more woody," or more "tinny." But ultimately we would still have a subjective question: "What sounds best to you?" It's exactly like asking, "What is your favorite color?" B)

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Ultimately, it will always come down to the player best using an instrument to convey the sound (and tones) he or she is using the instrument to convey. This first comes through the player, then through the player's hands, and then though the instrument. The player and the player's hands, of course, may also have to make certain nuanced adjustments in their playing to make certain sounds and tones come out of specific or different instruments.

 

Certain sounds and tones come naturally to some instruments, but a good player can also make the same sounds and tones come out of an instrument without those natural sounds and tones. That in itself can be one of the fun challenges of playing and having multiple guitars and advancing in one's guitar playing.

 

It's one of the cool things about the way so many Gibsons and Epis lend themselves to (from all eras) with each individual guitar being unique and playing/sounding unique.

 

That's my experience...

 

 

Jazzman Jeff aka QM

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Not really interested in the discussion of what's better, new or old - I like and play both - but nice to see pre-Gibson Epiphones discussed here.

 

I just want to let you know about my history research project on vintage Epiphone instruments (pre-1957 era):

NY Epi Reg - The Unofficial New York Epiphone Registry - http://wiedler.ch/nyepireg/

 

Centerpiece of the website is the Registry database – so far listing >2900 documented instruments (model, serial number, many with photo). There is a (growing) section on Epiphone models with descriptions of their typical features and changes over the years. Furthermore you find also a text about my ongoing research on Epiphone serial numbers (explaining my findings and revised serial-number-to-year allocation for certain periods).

 

Owners of pre-Gibson Epiphones are invited to submit info about their instruments. I am happy to discuss any questions regarding vintage Epiphones.

 

Cheers, Felix

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