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chefothefuture

L5 CT Double Cut; a new owner's view

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Hi all.

Well I guess this might also serve as as introduction to this forum. Though a "newbe" to this forum, I've been well acquainted with Gibsons and other brands (and their respective forums)for well beyond three

decades.

So I was delighted to see that Gibson finally gave their big bodied guitars a double venetian cutaway production model. Even though the 335 family has existed since 1958, I never thought they really fit the ideal.

The Byrd custom was a tantalizer for sure!

Now that I have one, I must say that it has fulfilled almost all of my expectations and then some.

It did need some addition set up work, but to be fair, I bought mine second hand, so it might have been just the way the guitar has settled in.

Sound wise it's fantastic. Yeah, so the double cutaways and thinner CT body do effect the tone but I didn't buy it for it's tone solely as an acoustic so that really wasn't an issue.

It's tone acoustically isn't bad either, so I'm not unhappy.

In some ways though, I would have liked a full depth better, but that's just because I like the look better.

However, this guitar is just fine the way it is so I'm not complaining.

The only other thin I can think of that bugs me are the Schaller M6s. I would have preferred Super Klusons but that's an appearance thing, not a functional one.

The one thing that still puzzles me is why Gibson chose to do this on an L5.

It would seem that given the demographic that goes for this body style, a laminate bodied guitar like an ES5 or a Tal Farlow would find a greater market.

Who knows?

I'm not complaining.

 

So- On a scale of 1 to 10, I'll gave it a 9.5.

The .5 point off for not being a full depth....

 

Cheers,

chef

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Hi all.

Well I guess this might also serve as as introduction to this forum. Though a "newbe" to this forum, I've been well acquainted with Gibsons and other brands (and their respective forums)for well beyond three

decades.

So I was delighted to see that Gibson finally gave their big bodied guitars a double venetian cutaway production model. Even though the 335 family has existed since 1958, I never thought they really fit the ideal.

The Byrd custom was a tantalizer for sure!

Now that I have one, I must say that it has fulfilled almost all of my expectations and then some.

It did need some addition set up work, but to be fair, I bought mine second hand, so it might have been just the way the guitar has settled in.

Sound wise it's fantastic. Yeah, so the double cutaways and thinner CT body do effect the tone but I didn't buy it for it's tone solely as an acoustic so that really wasn't an issue.

It's tone acoustically isn't bad either, so I'm not unhappy.

In some ways though, I would have liked a full depth better, but that's just because I like the look better.

However, this guitar is just fine the way it is so I'm not complaining.

The only other thin I can think of that bugs me are the Schaller M6s. I would have preferred Super Klusons but that's an appearance thing, not a functional one.

The one thing that still puzzles me is why Gibson chose to do this on an L5.

It would seem that given the demographic that goes for this body style, a laminate bodied guitar like an ES5 or a Tal Farlow would find a greater market.

Who knows?

I'm not complaining.

 

So- On a scale of 1 to 10, I'll gave it a 9.5.

The .5 point off for not being a full depth....

 

Cheers,

chef

a late 60s , 70s Es 150 was a deep body Double Cutaway.. L5 double cut would be interesting though..

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a late 60s , 70s Es 150 was a deep body Double Cutaway.. L5 double cut would be interesting though..

 

Very true, but I group the 60's-70's ES150 in with the 335 family due to it's body shape. The full depth on those is cool though.

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I add a half point (at least) for it being a thinline.

 

Pictures would be nice...

 

Danny W.

 

LOL! Well, it's so amazing as it is I'll give back that half point. A perfect 10 she is.

Photos to come when I get some decent light.

I only have an iPhone and I'd like to catch some of the figuring.

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I have M6 Schallers on a Stratocaster that the previous owner installed and they are really good. They may be the best non-locking tuners I have. The other Schallers I have are on a Strat Ultra from 1990, and are locking tuners.

 

I have some Klusons on a Les Paul I own from 2012, and while they look good, they are the worst tuners I have on any of my guitars. I am constantly retuning, sometimes in the middle of a song I am playing, especially the G string. I have an old archtop ES-347 (1990) with gold plated Grovers and they are pretty good.

 

The Schallers I have are the best tuners I have encountered. The Klusons are the worst. I know Schallers are made in Germany and can be hard to get as replacement tuners because they only like large orders from companies. I think Gibson made a good choice. Klusons are period specific junk, and the ones they put on new Gibson guitars are only replicas because the Kluson company is defunct. The real Klusons had plastic deterioration after 20 years due to denaturing of the plastic. I predict that you won't have a problem, with Schallers. I would not complain despite your ruminations on your guitar.

 

I think a pic of the headstock would be in order.

 

http://images.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Archtops/Custom/L-5-Doublecut/Gallery-Images/HSLCDCSITFGH1-Headstock.jpg

 

http://images.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Archtops/Custom/L-5-Doublecut/Gallery-Images/HSLCDCSITFGH1-Headstock-Back.jpg

 

Here's the Headstock on my ES-347; note the tulip shape:

 

IMG_1053-1.jpg

 

IMG_1203.jpg

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I have M6 Schallers on a Stratocaster that the previous owner installed and they are really good. They may be the best non-locking tuners I have. The other Schallers I have are on a Strat Ultra from 1990, and are locking tuners.

 

I have some Klusons on a Les Paul I own from 2012, and while they look good, they are the worst tuners I have on any of my guitars. I am constantly retuning, sometimes in the middle of a song I am playing, especially the G string. I have an old archtop ES-347 (1990) with gold plated Grovers and they are pretty good.

 

The Schallers I have are the best tuners I have encountered. The Klusons are the worst. I know Schallers are made in Germany and can be hard to get as replacement tuners because they only like large orders from companies. I think Gibson made a good choice. Klusons are period specific junk, and the ones they put on new Gibson guitars are only replicas because the Kluson company is defunct. The real Klusons had plastic deterioration after 20 years due to denaturing of the plastic. I predict that you won't have a problem, with Schallers. I would not complain despite your ruminations on your guitar.

 

I think a pic of the headstock would be in order.

 

http://images.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Archtops/Custom/L-5-Doublecut/Gallery-Images/HSLCDCSITFGH1-Headstock.jpg

 

http://images.gibson.com/Products/Electric-Guitars/Archtops/Custom/L-5-Doublecut/Gallery-Images/HSLCDCSITFGH1-Headstock-Back.jpg

 

Here's the Headstock on my ES-347; note the tulip shape:

 

IMG_1053-1.jpg

 

IMG_1203.jpg

 

I think it could depend on the particular model of tuner. The modern Kluson Deluxe can be pretty difficult even with the tighter ratio, but even the original deluxe's are a love/hate thing.

Conversely, I've had modern wafflebacks on my Tal Farlow for three years with no complaints. Same on a couple of Gretsch's.

Schaller's are certainly more consistent, so it makes sense from a production standpoint to use a tuner that would not be a potential warranty issue.

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I think you should check out the Tronical company, the people that make Min-etune and the newer Gforce tuner. These add-on units have white plastic buttons, that look like Klusons, and can be installed in about 20 minutes. The other plan is to seek those Kluson replicas and retrofit them. Me likes the gold plated Schallers.

 

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I have to say wow too.

 

I get what you are saying. It's not really a "full on" L-5 in that sense.

 

And neither, would a 335-type customer care to pay the price tag of anything like L-5 type builds.

 

But I'll say this, as far as anything thinline, THIS is over the top. WAY over the top.

 

I'd give it at LEAST an 11. I'd say 12 or 13.

 

I also don't think there is anything that could be played this couldn't do well, and better than most.

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Ok-

Well, here is the result of a retro-fit.

Caution be darned! LOL!

My guitar and I like the result.

I tried a "dry fit" with Imperials, but I preferred the Cartier like elegance of the Waffleback. Now if only there were a Sealfast re-issue.....

 

L5Head2.JPG

 

L5Head3.JPG

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I have to say wow too.

 

I get what you are saying. It's not really a "full on" L-5 in that sense.

 

And neither, would a 335-type customer care to pay the price tag of anything like L-5 type builds.

 

But I'll say this, as far as anything thinline, THIS is over the top. WAY over the top.

 

I'd give it at LEAST an 11. I'd say 12 or 13.

 

I also don't think there is anything that could be played this couldn't do well, and better than most.

 

Over the top?

Well, You can never be too rich, or too thin....

I'm now waiting for a Super 400 Double cut!

LOL!

 

Completely agree that this is beyond what a 335 customer would want unless they were going after a vintage one. Though there are some new models out of the Custom Shop that are fairly expensive....

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Those are very special Schaller tuners and waay over the top. They look better than the ones on the current versions of this guitar. You have nothing to worry about. Go and play this beauty... a lot!

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Hi all.

Well I guess this might also serve as as introduction to this forum. Though a "newbe" to this forum, I've been well acquainted with Gibsons and other brands (and their respective forums)for well beyond three

decades.

So I was delighted to see that Gibson finally gave their big bodied guitars a double venetian cutaway production model. Even though the 335 family has existed since 1958, I never thought they really fit the ideal.

The Byrd custom was a tantalizer for sure!

Now that I have one, I must say that it has fulfilled almost all of my expectations and then some.

It did need some addition set up work, but to be fair, I bought mine second hand, so it might have been just the way the guitar has settled in.

Sound wise it's fantastic. Yeah, so the double cutaways and thinner CT body do effect the tone but I didn't buy it for it's tone solely as an acoustic so that really wasn't an issue.

It's tone acoustically isn't bad either, so I'm not unhappy.

In some ways though, I would have liked a full depth better, but that's just because I like the look better.

However, this guitar is just fine the way it is so I'm not complaining.

The only other thin I can think of that bugs me are the Schaller M6s. I would have preferred Super Klusons but that's an appearance thing, not a functional one.

The one thing that still puzzles me is why Gibson chose to do this on an L5.

It would seem that given the demographic that goes for this body style, a laminate bodied guitar like an ES5 or a Tal Farlow would find a greater market.

Who knows?

I'm not complaining.

 

So- On a scale of 1 to 10, I'll gave it a 9.5.

The .5 point off for not being a full depth....

 

Cheers,

chef

 

Great purchase. Congrats. Personally I'd love a double cutaway L5. I own 2 CT's, a Super 400 and an L5. They are both really lovely.

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Ok- here are a couple of photos..

I'll try to get some better ones soon.

 

L51.JPG

L52.JPG

 

Just gorgeous. You are very lucky. Enjoy.

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Hi all.

Well I guess this might also serve as as introduction to this forum. Though a "newbe" to this forum, I've been well acquainted with Gibsons and other brands (and their respective forums)for well beyond three

decades.

So I was delighted to see that Gibson finally gave their big bodied guitars a double venetian cutaway production model. Even though the 335 family has existed since 1958, I never thought they really fit the ideal.

The Byrd custom was a tantalizer for sure!

Now that I have one, I must say that it has fulfilled almost all of my expectations and then some.

It did need some addition set up work, but to be fair, I bought mine second hand, so it might have been just the way the guitar has settled in.

Sound wise it's fantastic. Yeah, so the double cutaways and thinner CT body do effect the tone but I didn't buy it for it's tone solely as an acoustic so that really wasn't an issue.

It's tone acoustically isn't bad either, so I'm not unhappy.

In some ways though, I would have liked a full depth better, but that's just because I like the look better.

However, this guitar is just fine the way it is so I'm not complaining.

The only other thin I can think of that bugs me are the Schaller M6s. I would have preferred Super Klusons but that's an appearance thing, not a functional one.

The one thing that still puzzles me is why Gibson chose to do this on an L5.

It would seem that given the demographic that goes for this body style, a laminate bodied guitar like an ES5 or a Tal Farlow would find a greater market.

Who knows?

I'm not complaining.

 

So- On a scale of 1 to 10, I'll gave it a 9.5.

The .5 point off for not being a full depth....

 

Cheers,

chef

 

If you want more interesting tone you might consider installing an ebony bridge. I've put an ebony bridge on my L5 CT, L5CES and my Tal Farlow. I didn't put them on all at once but did so with each guitar after playing them for at least 3 years except the CT which i did after 12 moths of playing. Just a thought.

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I think it could depend on the particular model of tuner. The modern Kluson Deluxe can be pretty difficult even with the tighter ratio, but even the original deluxe's are a love/hate thing.

Conversely, I've had modern wafflebacks on my Tal Farlow for three years with no complaints. Same on a couple of Gretsch's.

Schaller's are certainly more consistent, so it makes sense from a production standpoint to use a tuner that would not be a potential warranty issue.

 

Have you posted photos of your Tal Farlow on the Gibson Forums? I own one and gig with it pretty regularly. I'd be interested in seeing some pics of yours. Luv the Tals

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Makes me jealous.

Dream of NGD. But I don't think it's happening.

Not unless I lose all self control and find my credit card has popped out of my wallet in the

Shoppe de la Guitarology.

 

And my parents thought learning an instrument was good for me.

It's more addictive than smoking crack.

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Have you posted photos of your Tal Farlow on the Gibson Forums? I own one and gig with it pretty regularly. I'd be interested in seeing some pics of yours. Luv the Tals

 

Actually I have not. I'll post one when I get it back from having some work done....

Yes, those Tals are great guitars :-)

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If you want more interesting tone you might consider installing an ebony bridge. I've put an ebony bridge on my L5 CT, L5CES and my Tal Farlow. I didn't put them on all at once but did so with each guitar after playing them for at least 3 years except the CT which i did after 12 moths of playing. Just a thought.

 

That would certainly bring out a different dimension. Right now, it pretty happy with the throaty tone with a brief top end ring on the end of a note.

Given that I play flats, it has a pleasing balance to my ear.

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