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Warped Pickguard


Dave F

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I picked this up today locally off CL.

 

Excellent condition, plays and sound great. Good price.

 

One issue. The pick guard was not being used and when I put it on its a little warped.

 

Does anyone have any little tricks to straighten it out?

 

Thanks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_0644_zps10ed4203.jpgIMG_0642_zps4477e42a.jpgIMG_0641_zps592572e7.jpg

 

 

 

 

IMG_0643_zpse7e1ce14.jpgIMG_0645_zpsfe02975e.jpg

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Mmmm, Rosewood Jumbo! Congrats.

 

The pickguard is cool, when seen in it's historical context, just like the stair step guard & headstock on RichG's '39 J-55. 'Just that the elevated p/g tends to be a bit percussive when playing. Perhaps you could ring Chicago Music Exchange and shoot them a pic; if they still have their '34 Jumbo Re-ish, they could tell you that yours is only a tad higher than normal.

 

I'm sure a gradual reshape could be accomplished with an iron, ironing board edge, the 'guard wrapped in a towel, and patience, if so inclined.

 

Craigslist just moved up a notch ; ).

 

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Mmmm, Rosewood Jumbo! Congrats.

 

The pickguard is cool, when seen in it's historical context, just like the stair step guard & headstock on RichG's '39 J-55. 'Just that the elevated p/g tends to be a bit percussive when playing. Perhaps you could ring Chicago Music Exchange and shoot them a pic; if they still have their '34 Jumbo Re-ish, they could tell you that yours is only a tad higher than normal.

 

I'm sure a gradual reshape could be accomplished with an iron, ironing board edge, the 'guard wrapped in a towel, and patience, if so inclined.

 

Craigslist just moved up a notch ; ).

 

 

I think your faded rose link got me searching although this is not short scale. So this one's on you.

 

I was concerned about the long scale but once I played it, it felt really good. I'm starting to like the V-neck contours.

 

This popped up on CL yesterday and the guy owned a business close to where I work so I took a long lunch and checked it out.

 

 

 

 

 

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I can't really tell from the photo if the PG is black or tortoise, but a non-cutaway bound L5 pickguard is a readily available part (in either color). If your straightening procedures don't work, I would install one of these:

 

http://www.allparts.com/PG-9817-043-Bound-Tortoise-L-5-Pickguard_p_2784.html

 

I have used the part shown above, and found them to be of equal or greater quality than the old Gibson originals.

 

Simply due to age of the guard, and inevitable off-gassing of the celluloid (if tortoise), I would just replace it any way as "preventive" maintenance.

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I would first just try placing the pickguard under a bunch of heavy book

 

As well as the iron and some damp towels, assuming the pickguard is not made of celluloid you could always put it between two pieces of glass and bake in an oven set on low for a bit. Others swear by using a hair dryer followed by placing heavy books on top of it using wax paper to separate the pickguard from the books.

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I can't really tell from the photo if the PG is black or tortoise, but a non-cutaway bound L5 pickguard is a readily available part (in either color). If your straightening procedures don't work, I would install one of these:

 

http://www.allparts....ard_p_2784.html

 

I have used the part shown above, and found them to be of equal or greater quality than the old Gibson originals.

 

Simply due to age of the guard, and inevitable off-gassing of the celluloid (if tortoise), I would just replace it any way as "preventive" maintenance.

 

 

I'll look into a new one. This one is celluloid tortoise and does have a few gas spots on it.

 

IMG_0648_zps602edf06.jpg

 

 

 

 

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I would first just try placing the pickguard under a bunch of heavy book

 

As well as the iron and some damp towels, assuming the pickguard is not made of celluloid you could always put it between two pieces of glass and bake in an oven set on low for a bit. Others swear by using a hair dryer followed by placing heavy books on top of it using wax paper to separate the pickguard from the books.

 

 

 

 

I'll give the pressure method a try first. I measured the bow width-wise and length-wise and then clamped it onto a board. I'll check it every few days to see if it's responding.

 

Since it is celluloid I'll avoid the heat.

 

IMG_0649_zps9ae00d9d.jpg

 

 

 

 

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I spoke to my luthier today. He said to use a hair dryer and get it warm but not to hot to handle.

 

That will make it pliable and able to bend.

 

I tried it and it worked well.

 

Here's a before and after.

 

 

IMG_0644_zps10ed4203.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_0651_zpsaf67b4b0.jpg

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Exxxcellent.

 

Now- as you know, major curiosity here about how this one sounds. You've measured 25.3" scale length; approaching the AJ's scale length of 25.5", but bracing which favors a different tone (?). Have you given a look under the hood? Compared it with anything similar in your herd? Any with/without p'guard tone tests?

 

A question for Gib history buffs: why didn't Gibson do anything short scale, like it's off-brand Recording King Ray Whitley, or the odd '40's Southern Jumbo, in rosewood? To that extent, the long-scale rosewood AJ of the 1930's was in very low production numbers, too.

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Exxxcellent.

 

Now- as you know, major curiosity here about how this one sounds. You've measured 25.3" scale length; approaching the AJ's scale length of 25.5", but bracing which favors a different tone (?). Have you given a look under the hood? Compared to anything similar in your herd? Any with or without 'guard tone tests?

 

A question for Gib history buffs: why didn't Gibson do anything short scale, like it's off-brand Recording King Ray Whitley, or the odd '40's Southern Jumbo, in rosewood? To that extent, the long-scale rosewood AJ of the 1930's was in very low production numbers, too.

 

Here's a few shots under the hood.

 

When I feel like changing some strings, I'll A/B/C it with the AJ Walnut and J200 RW. May have to sneak in the D41 Special.

 

First impressions - Very comfortable V profile neck. Guitar rumbles like the AJ. These are the only two guitars I have that vibrate that much. Lots of volume. Perfect neck angle and setup.

 

8FABB53F-1FBC-4453-A1A4-94A4FF586E6A_zpssz2nf7zf.jpg

 

8542FA6F-BCBB-48D8-BD1C-60F18BA6CFAC_zpsjlpmr77u.jpg

 

 

034C4631-BA78-4F31-8DE0-00E2A52967CA_zpsxoxigquf.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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