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Country Artist - "Country Song"


Searcy

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Pretty funny [biggrin]

 

However, to be fair that is country pop NOT real country. It's hardly fair to compare that rubbish to Joe Maphis, JD Crowe, The Osborne Brothers, Earl Scruggs, Old Crow Medicine Show or many of the other fantastic REAL country musicians. It's like comparing pop/ crossover classical nonsense to real classical. Pop classical sucks, pop rock sucks... anything with POP sucks for the most part.

 

To me all pop is pretty much the same - boring, uninspired and very tedious and belongs in the garbage!

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Yeah cause you know, you could never find four Pop, Rock, Metal, R&B, KlassiK Rokk, Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Journey, Cream, and especially Beatles songs like that. Ever. Couldn't happen. Only country. Seriously, have any of you listened to the radio in the last...45 years or so?

 

rct

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I'm sorry if that offended you, I really am. Sorry. But I really do not like Country. I don't know why, I just don't. That I won't appologise for. I also don't like Disco, Punk, Rap, and anything from those dumb arse American or Australian Idol programmes. Does that make me a bad man, or wrong? [mellow]

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What RCT said is very true. For example look at how many songs use an AM/ F/ C/ G progression or a G/ C/ D progression across ALL genres. Recycled chord progressions are used in probably 99% of what you hear on the radio these days anyway and that's why I never listen to it. Spotify is way better to find new (and old) music.

 

In rock/metal Iron Maiden made a career out of playing similar songs for 30 odd years. AC/DC you could splice together and have a similar result as the OP video. Red Hot Chili Peppers would work too...lots of bands you could sync to show how similar their songs are. All the hair metal bands from the 80's used simple recycled riffs/ chord progressions and that is still true today with a lot of the boring bands you see on TV etc.

 

If you listen outside the radio you find way more interesting music that is not based on formulaic ideas. That's not to say all formulaic music is bad - if it is genuine and real then it is good in my book, but that's down to personal preference I guess and opinions.

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I'm sorry if that offended you, I really am. Sorry. But I really do not like Country. I don't know why, I just don't. That I won't appologise for. I also don't like Disco, Punk, Rap, and anything from those dumb arse American or Australian Idol programmes. Does that make me a bad man, or wrong? [mellow]

 

Nobody offended me, and I don't care what you like or don't like, and it's a good bet that you have no idea what I like and don't like. To accept that this matching up of melodic and harmonic structure across songs, writers, and artists is some "thing" peculiar to country music is naïve at best. Whoever spent their time and energy lining all that up would be wise to use their equipment and skillz to maybe put out a song that sells like some of the ones they were making fun of.

 

rct

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I thought that was real, REAL cool.

 

I don't know why everyone gets so worked up about this being the same as that, or this music type sucks while this is superior.

 

Like, an interviewer once asked the great Jazz Musician Monk what type of music he liked, he said "There is only two kinds of music. Good music and bad music".

 

I think nearly all the music we listen to or have today, it all comes from the same place, and it's made the same way. They all have their roots in the same place.

 

Lots of country, blues, "Americana" (as they call it, don't really know why), it actually comes from everyday poeple learning to play one or two same songs that everyone adjust to or adds lyrics to. Get together on the porch and play with each other and have music.

 

I guess to say that to me, playing the same or similar chord progression or rythm doesn't make it less authentic, it makes it MORE authentic.

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https://medium.com/cuepoint/why-do-all-records-sound-the-same-830ba863203

 

 

 

There was once a little-watched video on Maroon 5's YouTube channel (now deleted, but visible here and here) which documents the tortuous, tedious process of crafting an instantly-forgettable mainstream radio hit.

 

It’s fourteen minutes of elegantly dishevelled chaps sitting in leather sofas, playing $15,000 vintage guitars next to $200,000 studio consoles, staring at notepads and endlessly discussing how little they like the track (called “Makes Me Wonder”), and how it doesn’t have a chorus. Even edited down, the tedium is mind-boggling as they play the same lame riff over and over and over again. At one point, singer Adam Levine says: “I’m sick of trying to engineer songs to be hits.” But that’s exactly he proceeds to do.

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https://medium.com/cuepoint/why-do-all-records-sound-the-same-830ba863203

 

 

 

There was once a little-watched video on Maroon 5's YouTube channel (now deleted, but visible here and here) which documents the tortuous, tedious process of crafting an instantly-forgettable mainstream radio hit.

 

It’s fourteen minutes of elegantly dishevelled chaps sitting in leather sofas, playing $15,000 vintage guitars next to $200,000 studio consoles, staring at notepads and endlessly discussing how little they like the track (called “Makes Me Wonder”), and how it doesn’t have a chorus. Even edited down, the tedium is mind-boggling as they play the same lame riff over and over and over again. At one point, singer Adam Levine says: “I’m sick of trying to engineer songs to be hits.” But that’s exactly he proceeds to do.

 

This is news?

 

rct

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Nobody offended me, and I don't care what you like or don't like, and it's a good bet that you have no idea what I like and don't like. To accept that this matching up of melodic and harmonic structure across songs, writers, and artists is some "thing" peculiar to country music is naïve at best. Whoever spent their time and energy lining all that up would be wise to use their equipment and skillz to maybe put out a song that sells like some of the ones they were making fun of.

 

rct

 

 

I fully agree with you. Everything seems engineered to get that perfect 2:45 song (and I use that word losely). All done to a set formular. Where's the creativity?

As one recording company executive was overheard to say recently...."Individuality is fine, as long as we're all doing it together". (?)

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