Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Need a photographer to answer...


rct

Recommended Posts

We were going through some stuff and came across a box with a couple old disposable cameras in it. Along with them were a few rolls of film that have nothing coming out of them, and a halfa dozen rolls with piece of film sticking out which I think I remember being film that had not been used yet. Along with a couple sealed rolls of film.

 

This is all 35mm, 24 exp., some 200 and some 400. 6 are Kodak, two are Seattle Filmworks(where the hellz did we get that?)

 

It is possible we bought it in 2003 and went on our first 6 week U.S. tour and didn't use it all. It is also possible that it is even older than that, there are not any markings that I could see anywhere, but I may not have looked hard enough.

 

So, do I remember right that with the little piece sticking out it is unused?

 

If it really is ten or more years old, is it any good? If it is, do you want it?

 

Thanks!

 

rct

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Give it a try, it may have shifted but it might be interesting. Look at the Seatle Filmworks ones - if they say Process C-41 you can still get it developed, if they say something else, you're probably out of luck. Seattle Filmworks got their start by buying unused ends of movie film and selling and processing it cheap. The older movie film stock could be processed in C-41, but most processors wouldn't because it had a backing material. Any Kodachrome you're out of luck too - they stopped processing that in 2010. I had a roll of Ekatchrome processed last year that had sat since 2001 and it came out just fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ones with the small ammount of film hanging out are un-exposed rolls. The reverse for the ones with nothing. They've been exposed.

I honestly wouldn't use the un-exposed stuff, but the already shot film might yeld something interesting. I've successfully printed off pics that have come from rolls that were shot nearly ten years previous.

Give it a go, nothing to lose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's the wee small hours of Thursday morning (1992) here and I'm just home from an exhausting night of caber tossing and Gay Gordon-ing whilst gargling whisky'n'haggis mouthwash...

 

The exposed film?

It depends to a large extent on how it's been stored. If it's gone through many great temperature changes then there might well be colour-shift, exposure lightening and saturation loss ('latent image regression') but I'd still say there is every chance of getting good results from the developed film. Even in apparently 'hopeless' cases a simple Ctr/Shift/L in Photoshop can work absolute wonders. I know from personal experience. Get Them Developed!

 

The unused film?

It's probably still going to be OK. There might be a slight shift in ISO/ASA sensitivity but it'll probably still work if you feel like giving it a go. My only caveat would be not to use it for anything of importance.

 

I haven't used film for over a decade. Don't miss it other than all the untold fun which can be found in a darkroom.

In ten minutes I'm heading in to Trafalgar Square to join in the 'Charlie Hebdo' rally. I'll be shooting Digital...

 

Philip.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We were going through some stuff and came across a box with a couple old disposable cameras in it. Along with them were a few rolls of film that have nothing coming out of them, and a halfa dozen rolls with piece of film sticking out which I think I remember being film that had not been used yet. Along with a couple sealed rolls of film.

 

This is all 35mm, 24 exp., some 200 and some 400. 6 are Kodak, two are Seattle Filmworks(where the hellz did we get that?)

 

It is possible we bought it in 2003 and went on our first 6 week U.S. tour and didn't use it all. It is also possible that it is even older than that, there are not any markings that I could see anywhere, but I may not have looked hard enough.

 

So, do I remember right that with the little piece sticking out it is unused?

 

If it really is ten or more years old, is it any good? If it is, do you want it?

 

Thanks!

 

rct

 

Had to be some good chit Y'all were on Pal

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's the wee small hours of Thursday morning (1992) here and I'm just home from an exhausting night of caber tossing and Gay Gordon-ing whilst gargling whisky'n'haggis mouthwash...

 

The exposed film?

It depends to a large extent on how it's been stored. If it's gone through many great temperature changes then there might well be colour-shift, exposure lightening and saturation loss ('latent image regression') but I'd still say there is every chance of getting good results from the developed film. Even in apparently 'hopeless' cases a simple Ctr/Shift/L in Photoshop can work absolute wonders. I know from personal experience. Get Them Developed!

 

The unused film?

It's probably still going to be OK. There might be a slight shift in ISO/ASA sensitivity but it'll probably still work if you feel like giving it a go. My only caveat would be not to use it for anything of importance.

 

I haven't used film for over a decade. Don't miss it other than all the untold fun which can be found in a darkroom.

In ten minutes I'm heading in to Trafalgar Square to join in the 'Charlie Hebdo' rally. I'll be shooting Digital...

 

Philip.

 

 

Gay Gordon-ing whilst gargling whisky'n'haggis mouthwash , Dang Philip rough night

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The unused film?

It's probably still going to be OK. There might be a slight shift in ISO/ASA sensitivity but it'll probably still work if you feel like giving it a go.

 

 

So, if I had some old stock and there could have been a slight shift in the ASA/ISO, could I compensate for that by changing the ISO setting on the body before shooting then?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, if I had some old stock and there could have been a slight shift in the ASA/ISO, could I compensate for that by changing the ISO setting on the body before shooting then?

TBH I doubt there would be any need if it's regular C-41 style Colour Negative film.

These film emulsions have such a wide exposure latitude you could over/underexpose by around three full stops before any really serious loss of detail is concerned.

Also remember that the shelf-life of these types of lilm is typically three years or more; there is quite a bit of a safety-belt built in.

 

Further to Flight's observations;

I had a summer job in a Camera/Print shop back in around 1985.

One day an elderly lady came in having discovered an exposed roll of B'n'W film in a drawer after her husband passed away.

On development it turned out to be photographs of the Isle of Man T.T. Races way back in 1957.

Although the negs were, admittedly, on the 'thin' (effectively underexposed) side - compared with how they would have been if processed in '57 - the prints still turned out fine.

 

P.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gay Gordon-ing whilst gargling whisky'n'haggis mouthwash , Dang Philip rough night

Ahh, I just take it as it comes, Hayden.

I'm just relieved I got the punctuation in my earlier post correct. Some of the permutation possibilities are scary...

 

P.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the fall of '77 my then-girlfriend and I went for a long walk and one place we stopped was a garage sale. There was an old Brownie type camera there fro 50 cents and I bought it. I think it was 127 film, either 8 or 12 exposure. There was still film in it from God knows when. I figured the shutter HAD to have been hit at some point so I advanced to the next photo and snapped a pic of Debbie. I dropped the film off at a friend's house, who was into photography old school, developing his own film etc. I spent many a bachelor Saturday night at his parents' house geeking out over Kodabromide and Ektalure and developing pics of whatever girlfriend I didn't have.

 

He developed it and not only did the Debbie pic come out, so did a pic of some random chick sitting on what looked like a NYC apartment house circa 1950! 25+ years to finish a film?? Those were the only two that came out. I don't recall if they were light struck or what, but no go on them.

 

Probably not worth it to try to use that old film but just saying "stranger things have happened".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd say best simply, "listen to Pippy."

 

On supposedly unexposed old film - with a bit hanging out of the little cartridge - go ahead and try, but not for anything important. There's more than just temperature differential that it may have been exposed to. I "lost" a cupla rolls returning France in '75 that were apparently clouded by the xray tech at airports at the time.

 

Since then on any "work" travels, I've tried to have film processed asap, although even that didn't do well with some Ilford C41 chromogenic B/W film - and loss of about 30 36-rolls due to the processor's chemistry and the thicker emulsion at the time. That little trip was quite expensive for the folks I was shooting for, and the photos irreplaceable but... stuff happens. The guy with the bank account for the trip, a longtime acquaintance through interesting circumstances, said he'd never seen me so angry.

 

So... if it's not a major cost concern, I'd say go ahead and develop what appears to have been exposed, and play with the film that appears to have been unexposed. Just one other point, though. Not everyone rewinds all the film back into the canister.

 

m

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back in the late '80s my parents decided to move from the house I grew up in. There was a built-in library type wooden shelf in the den that went all the way up to the ceiling. As we were loading up the books for the move, we came across some old film canisters with no dates or notes sitting on one of the shelves behind some of the books. We had them developed & they were some pictures of us when I was a kid back in the 60's! It was color film but the coloring was skewed from the original due to sitting 20 years on the shelf I guess but what memories they brought back! If you have some film where the roll of film is wound up inside the canister, get it developed! There are memories in there! Kind of a cool mystery to see what "develops"...literally!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So it sounds like we have 8 rolls of unused film, that might still be usable. We haven't had a 35mm since...2003, it's at least that old now. So I'll see if anybody at work wants it.

 

Thanks fotogrifferz!

 

rct

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TBH I doubt there would be any need if it's regular C-41 style Colour Negative film.

These film emulsions have such a wide exposure latitude you could over/underexpose by around three full stops before any really serious loss of detail is concerned.

Also remember that the shelf-life of these types of lilm is typically three years or more; there is quite a bit of a safety-belt built in.

 

They're KodaChrome 400 speed. Been sitting in a box in a dark, cool room. So, if I manualy shift the ISO setting, do I do it up or down? If there was any loss at all, then logicaly I'd have to go up one stop wouldn't I?

I can still remember the smell of developer and fixer! Can you? lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...It was color film but the coloring was skewed from the original due to sitting 20 years on the shelf I guess...

Brytam; I'd seriously recommend you have the prints scanned by someone (yourself?) who has any version of Photoshop or indeed any similar photo-imaging software.

Most have an 'auto colour-balance' button and I'd be astonished if the results were not great.

In fact the cheapest version of Photoshop, 'Photoshop Elements', even has a 'dropper' icon for 'Correct Colour for Skin-tone' which gets it 90% right 90% of the time.

 

They're KodaChrome 400 speed. Been sitting in a box in a dark, cool room. So, if I manualy shift the ISO setting, do I do it up or down? If there was any loss at all, then logicaly I'd have to go up one stop wouldn't I?

I can still remember the smell of developer and fixer! Can you? lol

Could you check on that film title, MP?

35mm Kodachrome was only available in 25, 64 and 200 film-speeds.

 

It might well be Ektachrome 400 or Kodacolour 400. If it is either of these then you are in luck as the E-6 (colour-reversal) and C-41 (colour negative) processes are still extant.

I'd guess (and it is just a guess) that the sensitivity wouldn't have changed much. If anything it might have increased slightly but as 400 film was intended to be rated at 320 in the first place 400 should be fine.

 

If it IS some type of Kodachrome then I'm afraid to say you are out of luck.

I've double checked and the K-14 process was discontinued in December 2010.

 

Philip.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...