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Photo for L7 B4 1947


artb

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PHOTO ADDED for preceding question for L7 age indicated by GIBSON style marking. The shell inlay is horizontal rather than diagonal as on later L7s. artb

 

 

 

tried twice down to 61k size to get notice of too big to include. I will not use remote photo storage. So for second time give up this good but incompatible forum. artb.

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We hate to lose you and especially pics of a good old Gibson. I know of no other way to get pictures on here other than remote photo storage.

 

I would agree.....it is a pain in the butt. I would certainly post more pictures than I do, if it was a less time-consuming process (PITA).

 

Rod

 

 

 

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j45nick...THANK YOU for fine photos. Mine is the earlier script you show so well but is horizontal not angled with G and N in line horizontily. With help like your's no need for my photos. artb

 

 

Yours is older, probably 1942 or earlier. It probably has a different headstock inlay (rather than the crown), and different fretboard inlays (rather than the parallelograma). If you could describe those two things (headstock and board inlays) it would help a bit.

 

Also, measure across the widest part of the guitar body. It will be either 16" or 17". Try to ignore the shape, and measure across as if it were a flat surface.

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Yours is older, probably 1942 or earlier. It probably has a different headstock inlay (rather than the crown), and different fretboard inlays (rather than the parallelograma). If you could describe those two things (headstock and board inlays) it would help a bit.

 

Also, measure across the widest part of the guitar body. It will be either 16" or 17". Try to ignore the shape, and measure across as if it were a flat surface.

 

It is 17" with crown and fret board as you show. artb

 

 

'

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Yours is older, probably 1942 or earlier. It probably has a different headstock inlay (rather than the crown), and different fretboard inlays (rather than the parallelograma). If you could describe those two things (headstock and board inlays) it would help a bit.

 

Also, measure across the widest part of the guitar body. It will be either 16" or 17". Try to ignore the shape, and measure across as if it were a flat surface.

 

It is 17" with crown and fret board as you show except it is ebony. artb

 

 

'

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It is 17" with crown and fret board as you show except it is ebony. artb

 

 

'

 

 

Probably around 1942. If you want, email me a couple of photos and I will try to give you something a bit more definitive. You can do that through my profile here.

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Probably around 1942. If you want, email me a couple of photos and I will try to give you something a bit more definitive. You can do that through my profile here.

 

I REALLY APPRECIATE your organizing this no photo mess for me confirming my belief also for a pre WW2 age. artb (I may accept using the lousy photo repro system after all} Forums are only as good as the participants and the enthusiasm in spite of my negative attitude is great

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I REALLY APPRECIATE your organizing this no photo mess for me confirming my belief also for a pre WW2 age. artb (I may accept using the lousy photo repro system after all} Forums are only as good as the participants and the enthusiasm in spite of my negative attitude is great

 

 

The crown headstock inlay and parallelogram inlays on board apparently started in 1942, which was after the start of WW2, so I would not call it pre-WW2. It is certainly sometime around the start of WW2, or early in WW2. Without a serial number it would be hard to pin it down much more than that.

 

I would take a small LED flashlight and illuminated the white paper label from several angles to try to see if the serial number might be legible. You might also explore the inside a bit with a small inspection mirror inserted through the f-holes. You'd be surprised at how much you can see and learn.

 

For f-hole guitars, I use a small, round extension inspection mirror I picked up at an auto parts store, and an LED penlight which I shone into the guitar.

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Yours is older, probably 1942 or earlier.

 

The 17" split-parallelogram L-7 is certainly '42+, but it's been my finding, through comparing documented serial numbers and headstock logos, that the large straight script logo was used until (and at least) well into 1946.

 

The large slanted script logo, which happens to be my all-time favorite Gibson logo, was only used for a very short time around 1947 and early 1948. The short-lived large slanted script logo also spanned the change in serial number systems from the end of the 5-digit numerical system into the beginning of the "A" series.

 

From the information provided, I would say the build date of guitar under discussion could only be narrowed down to '42-46. Serial numbers from this era are completely documented and verified. If the number can be deciphered off the label, the date can be easily determined.

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The 17" split-parallelogram L-7 is certainly '42+, but it's been my finding, through comparing documented serial numbers and headstock logos, that the large straight script logo was used until (and at least) well into 1946.

 

The large slanted script logo, which happens to be my all-time favorite Gibson logo, was only used for a very short time around 1947 and early 1948. The short-lived large slanted script logo also spanned the change in serial number systems from the end of the 5-digit numerical system into the beginning of the "A" series.

 

From the information provided, I would say the build date of guitar under discussion could only be narrowed down to '42-46. Serial numbers from this era are completely documented and verified. If the number can be deciphered off the label, the date can be easily determined.

 

I had an L50 definitely 1944 that was excellent. I am a little surprised the wartime made L7 is slso a really good one. Nice to know its 1942+. THANKS TO ALL artb

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