Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Recommended Posts

Hi I'm having a problem with my J-35 ....

when I tune the high E string with a tuner, the tuner says it's in tune but the string is way sharp so I always have to tune it down to pitch by ear.

It's only started doing this lately and I can't really work out why... The only change I've made is to D'Addario 12's strings instead of using Elixir HD Lights

 

Would changing string type and gauge make a tuning problem occur ?

I'm thinking of taking it in to see the guitar tech at my local store to see what he thinks the problem is

 

I'm still loving my J-35 the top is starting to darken now and the guitar seems to be starting to open up tone wise, it's my favourite guitar and it's getting played everyday.

 

I have been considering getting the tech to fit a bone saddle and pins, I was thinking about changing the pickup to a Baggs lyric but the tech suggested me trying a Baggs Para DI first

 

Any input would be great thanks guys

Link to post
Share on other sites

May be more a tuner tuning issue than a J-35 tuning issue. Some clip-on tuners don't pick up the low E very well; if that is happening, try clipping it between the 5th & 6th string tuners to pick up vibrations better. Also- batteries dwindling will not pick up well, especially on a larger guitar like the J-35, compared to a smaller or punchier guitar like your Taylor 322e. Did you ever try squeezing the clip on part of the tuner a bit while tuning uncooperative strings? ..this usually helps. Hitting the 12th fret harmonic often yields a fairly true signal, too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As an overall backup that is "free," if you have a "smart phone," download the free tuner app from Martin's web site. It gives a tone or a cute little dial that sez if you're in tune or not.

 

As a onetime pitchpipe user before "tuners" were were invented, I have a tendency if it ain't loud around me just to use the tone on my Samsung Android. it comes for the iphone too...

 

m

Link to post
Share on other sites

As an overall backup that is "free," if you have a "smart phone," download the free tuner app from Martin's web site. It gives a tone or a cute little dial that sez if you're in tune or not.

 

As a onetime pitchpipe user before "tuners" were were invented, I have a tendency if it ain't loud around me just to use the tone on my Samsung Android. it comes for the iphone too...

 

m

 

Another vote for pitch pipes from me.

Still use them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,

 

I had an similar issue with my H-Bird lately. After a string change the guitar was kind of untunable. I changed the saddle, adjusted the truss rod, tried nut sauce on the nut and the bridge. (I usually only use nut sauce on my bigsby equipped electric).

 

I was almost ready to take it to a tech, but then I decided to change the strings again. Turned out the set I used before was bad. New strings (and well yeah, a different brand this time) and all my tuning issues were gone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I see this too sometimes on all my guitars. I have a Peterson Strobo-clip tuner that I like much more than the Snark. But I just use the tuner to get "into the ballpark". I then play a bunch of chords and fine tune to my taste.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the years regarding tuning, I've discovered I have to learn each guitar's quirks and personality in order to optimize tuning. No guitar is the same and as a result I have to tune each one just a bit differently but nearly always very slightly detune the high E & B a couple cents. And it's even more critical for me since I play in DADGAD and the high strings are tuned lower to begin with. On one guitar, I'll tune using octaves; on another I'll use both octaves and 5ths; on another I'll use harmonics to achieve the most accurate tuning for THAT guitar. I've not had any tuning issues with my J-35 but still tune the high A & D about 2 cents lower, along with the low D. When capoing, I place the capo directly on the fret (like Tony Rice and many others) which avoids any string stretch and pulling the strings sharp. I never have to retune when using a capo. So it's important to learn each guitar's tuning quirks and what works best for each guitar.

 

As johnny mentioned, it's possible to get a bad set of strings. I've had two sets of Adamas 1818 where the bass string was about 5 cents sharp when fretting that string or on the 12th fret harmonic. Drove me nuts. Switched the Adamas 6th with a Martin M540 6th and intonation was perfect.

 

Also, it's possible for a nut slot to be cut incorrectly, allowing the string to rest at a point just ahead of the front edge of the nut, which changes the scale length. As a result, when that sting is correctly tuned open using a tuner, when fretted, the intonation will be off.

 

DC

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuning can certainly be a bit hit and miss now and again, but my Snark seems to do a great job with my J45 custom with Masterbuilt strings :)

 

However this guy is sure we are all doing it wrong...

http://youtu.be/8tfxy_zs0Mo

 

 

I wimped out and watched the 10-minute version of his tuning video. I actually found it useful. Not sure I could have sat through an hour on tuning, however.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...