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Slinky1

NGD...Southern Jumbo 12 fret

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Sound hole to twelfth fret is 4 15/16 in. I measured twice. Seems to be just under five inches.

 

That is pretty consistent with my calculation of the resultant shift in the soundhole: between 1 1/4" and 1 3/8" closer to the butt end of the guitar compared to a 14-fretter. The actual distance from the 12th fret to the soundhole is the same in both 12-fretters and 14-fretters, but of course the neck-to-body joint is in a different location.

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Just for visual reference - here is the JB I used to own. Like Slinky's guitar it has the smaller burst. I do not have this guitar anymore, so I can't take measurements, but it did seem to have the sound hole lower down in the body. The was a very rich sounding guitar, but very closely duplicated the sound I get out of the Legend.

DSC04155_zps9a4c2ee1.jpg

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Sound hole to twelfth fret is 4 15/16 in. I measured twice. Seems to be just under five inches.

 

 

That is pretty consistent with my calculation of the resultant shift in the soundhole: between 1 1/4" and 1 3/8" closer to the butt end of the guitar compared to a 14-fretter. The actual distance from the 12th fret to the soundhole is the same in both 12-fretters and 14-fretters, but of course the neck-to-body joint is in a different location.

 

Thanks, Slinky. 5 3/16" soundhole to 12th measured on the Guild 12 fret. Nick, you are more keen on fret count than I. Here's UGMF'er Buck on number of frets and consideration on soundhole location in a discussion about the 12-fret Martin HD-28VS. Also mentioned is how the distance of bridge to cross brace as being more constant, and more critical:

 

" The distance from the 12th to 14th fret is about 1 3/8". The 14 fret body is 1" shorter, so the bridge moves enough to make up the other 3/8".

 

The reason that I don't reference the sound hole with 12 fret guitar is because the position changes depending on whether the guitar has a 19 or 20 fret board. Regardless, the X-brace is further from the sound hole, but that is not the important issue. It's the relationship of the X-brace to the bridge. That is nearly identical on 12 fret D's and forward braced 14 fret D's. As you noted, it's not "forward shifted", since that is the original position. I call it simply "forward" because it is forward most position used.

 

So, an HD-28VS will sound more like an HD-28V than it will an HD-28 because of the bracing position. A 1975 D-28S is very different from a 1975 D-28 because of the soundboard size, internal volume, stiffer neck, AND bracing position. This is why we tend to hear more difference between 14 fret and 12 fret guitars of that era than we do modern guitars - there are more internal differences."

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Thanks, Slinky. 5 3/16" soundhole to 12th measured on the Guild 12 fret. Nick, you are more keen on fret count than I. Here's UGMF'er Buck on number of frets and consideration on soundhole location in a discussion about the 12-fret Martin HD-28VS. Also mentioned is how the distance of bridge to cross brace as being more constant, and more critical:

 

" The distance from the 12th to 14th fret is about 1 3/8". The 14 fret body is 1" shorter, so the bridge moves enough to make up the other 3/8".

 

The reason that I don't reference the sound hole with 12 fret guitar is because the position changes depending on whether the guitar has a 19 or 20 fret board. Regardless, the X-brace is further from the sound hole, but that is not the important issue. It's the relationship of the X-brace to the bridge. That is nearly identical on 12 fret D's and forward braced 14 fret D's. As you noted, it's not "forward shifted", since that is the original position. I call it simply "forward" because it is forward most position used.

 

So, an HD-28VS will sound more like an HD-28V than it will an HD-28 because of the bracing position. A 1975 D-28S is very different from a 1975 D-28 because of the soundboard size, internal volume, stiffer neck, AND bracing position. This is why we tend to hear more difference between 14 fret and 12 fret guitars of that era than we do modern guitars - there are more internal differences."

 

That's a bit of an apples and oranges comparison. We have far fewer variables in the 12/14 fret Gibson variations, as I'm pretty sure they use the same body. The 12 and 14 fret Martin D's have very different bodies, with the 12-fretters using the original round-shoulder Martin D body, and the 14-fretters the familiar square dread D body.

 

I could be wrong on the 12/14 fret Gibsons using the same body plan, and I wish someone like Modoc would chime in on this.

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That's a bit of an apples and oranges comparison. We have far fewer variables in the 12/14 fret Gibson variations, as I'm pretty sure they use the same body. The 12 and 14 fret Martin D's have very different bodies, with the 12-fretters using the original round-shoulder Martin D body, and the 14-fretters the familiar square dread D body.

 

I could be wrong on the 12/14 fret Gibsons using the same body plan, and I wish someone like Modoc would chime in on this.

 

 

 

It's true. they are they same. Gibson sets the neck further into the body so the bridge is further back, but the body is the same. When ours came into the shop, we hung it next to a J45TV and the 12 fret SJ "looked" like it was bigger... but it isn't.

 

Congrats on the new guitar! This is actually based off of a custom order that I had them build a short run of a few years ago. They did a couple of tiny little tweaks (like no pickup and a normal size neck) this time around... but nice to see another one.

 

 

-Keith

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It's true. they are they same. Gibson sets the neck further into the body so the bridge is further back, but the body is the same. When ours came into the shop, we hung it next to a J45TV and the 12 fret SJ "looked" like it was bigger... but it isn't.

 

Congrats on the new guitar! This is actually based off of a custom order that I had them build a short run of a few years ago. They did a couple of tiny little tweaks (like no pickup and a normal size neck) this time around... but nice to see another one.

 

 

-Keith

 

 

Keith, how would you compare the tonal character of the 12-fretter vs the 14-fretter of the same spec? Is there a noticeable difference?

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Keith, how would you compare the tonal character of the 12-fretter vs the 14-fretter of the same spec? Is there a noticeable difference?

 

 

huge difference. on a Gibson 12 fret, the bridge is pushed further back in the bracing so it's in the center of the open area. this means that it tends to sound louder, fuller, and more open. though, it doesn't react quite as quick. none of that super bright, really percussive stuff. just a big boomy and warm guitar. very cool.

 

btw, different dealers are showing different specs on this guitar. particularly the top. When Gibson sent the list out to dealers, this model was listed as having a sitka top. that's not true. I realized that it was priced like many models with adi, and the top of the one we got in looks like adi. so, i made a call today. my guy in Bozeman checked the actual build sheet.... it's adi. not sitka like most sites are listing.

 

 

Keith

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Sorry, if not for Dan, there would be no pictures.

To my ear though, it certainly has that vintage Gibson tone.

But, I love all my Gibsons. I have a J-200, J-15 and a BluesKing also. The BluesKing is cool, but for my style, the small body doesn't work so well.

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I'm wondering how it compares to the J-15? Is it a chunkier neck? Volume, tone, handle hard strumming as well.

Sorry to bombard with questions, but I was thinking about getting a used J-45 TV and am now considering this SJ 12 fret. I sold my Jackson Browne yesterday and another consideration is getting a J-15 and putting the $$ difference in the bank for now--those J-15's are a great buy!

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I'm wondering how it compares to the J-15? Is it a chunkier neck? Volume, tone, handle hard strumming as well.

Sorry to bombard with questions, but I was thinking about getting a used J-45 TV and am now considering this SJ 12 fret. I sold my Jackson Browne yesterday and another consideration is getting a J-15 and putting the $$ difference in the bank for now--those J-15's are a great buy!

 

 

bigger neck than a J15 and definitely more bass boom. handles hard strumming quite well. I think that's really what they do best.

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Nid2007,

 

As much as I love my SJ 12 fret, And I believe it is "the one" for me, it's hard to beat that J-15. If you are wanting to save some money, get the J-15.

 

I love my J-15. The neck on the two feel very similar. I measured the nut width on the SJ 12 fret it was 1.750 inches. The J-15 is, according to Gibson is 1.725. Very small difference. The SJ does seen a tad wider.

 

I don't think you can go wrong either way.

 

The SJ is a strumming machine.

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Thanks Slinky. I'm torn. That little bit of nut width can mean s lot to me sometimes. Though without the Browne's 7/8 in my stable any longer, it may start to mean less the more I play my other guitars.

 

Sorry if this was mentioned above already, but do we know whether the bracing of your SJ is the same as on the TV models?

 

Thanks for the info.

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nid2007, man! This neck on the SJ is so very comfortable.

 

The frets!

 

The frets feel very wide, but very comfortable. I love this guitar. I believe it is my number 1. This guitar is me. This guitar is very comfortable strumming, finger picking and flat picking.

 

I can not say enough good things about this SJ. I've looked it over pretty good,not with mirror in sound hole though, and the fit and finish is outstanding. Believe it or not, the set up was awesome straight out of the box. The action was very low, but no buzzing. Strums like a champ.

 

I am very happy with my new Southern Jumbo. Worth every penny to me.

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Wow that is a simply stunning guitar congrats man I think that's the best looking guitar I've seen from Gibson...

brrrr if only I hadn't just ordered my new Atkin J 45 I would definitely been hunting one down here in the UK

Enjoy your new guitar [thumbup]

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Tony says its the best acoustic he has played out of Bozemon period. Pretty sick endorsement. And......

 

Wildwood has one in stock :)

So they do http://www.wildwoodguitars.com/products/10145067.php?CategoryID=432&n=30

If this had a rectangle bridge, thru saddle, and 19 frets, I'd be selling my wife's piano in the morning. [biggrin]

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So they do http://www.wildwoodguitars.com/products/10145067.php?CategoryID=432&n=30

If this had a rectangle bridge, thru saddle, and 19 frets, I'd be selling my wife's piano in the morning. [biggrin]

 

 

Interestingly, most of the earliest SJ's (1943) had 19 frets, a through saddle, and a belly-down (Martin style) bridge. This Fuller's 1943 SJ re-issue comes pretty close, except for the bound fretboard. which came later:

 

SJ2.jpg

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