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What's going to happen to the Blues?


Guitarooster52

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There was a time when I didn't think Zeppelin was blues based. That is until I started playing a lot of it. The Blues hides in songs waiting to be discovered by then next Jimmy Page. It's always been there and always will.

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I see you don't like his recent work.

 

Well... I think that "Road to Escondido" is one of his best albums. I don't want to compare with beano or Disraeli Gears (it's pointless) but that CD is always in my car.

 

"Me and Mr Johnson" is also very good.

 

"Me and Mr Johnson" - Hells yeah! I keep that right next to my "From the Cradle,", and "Ridin' with the King" in my car as well.

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As long as there are middle aged white guys there will be blues of some degree around. I can't go to a show or an open mic in this town without having to sit through a rendition of little wing or pride and joy by a beer bellied backwards kangol wearing soul patch sporting white guy.

 

Check out Mississippi blues and watch who the north mississippi allstars and duane burnside (his dad is R.L.) are touring with. They usually pickup good underground bands. Look up some old stuff you may never have heard of. I just bouhgt a couple junior kimbrough albums after hearing the black keys cover him for a few years. Model t ford and others on the old fat possom label are pretty good too.

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I would hope that the definition of blues comes to encompass more than just songs which have ONLY the same 3 chords, have vocals which have to adhere to the lyrical pattern of sing a line, repeat that same line with the first chord change, etc. and whose guitar solos consist mainly of a selection of those 800 standard blues licks. I hope that blues will be a music defined by its feeling, not by its musical structure. That hope goes for jazz too, by the way.

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I don't know about you blues is on the rise here were i live. All thanks to a highschool guitar teacher/active blues player. he got me addicted to the sound and now i just can't stop playin it.

 

Also if you are looking for a pretty main stream artist, there is one that stands out to me. Jonny Lang he is a great blues guitarist as well as many other instruments. Word of warning though some of his stuff might seem upbeat.

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Good luck. Last time I went to a "blues" bar, it was depressing. Oh, it was hopping, but I had to quote Peter Griffin:

 

"Awful lotta' honkies in here..."

 

Not into pale-blues here (aside from Johnny Winter...the palest of them all). Too much of that nowadays. :P

 

H-Bomb

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Good luck. Last time I went to a "blues" bar' date=' it was depressing. Oh, it was hopping, but I had to quote Peter Griffin:

 

"Awful lotta' honkies in here..."

 

Not into pale-blues here (aside from Johnny Winter...the palest of them all). Too much of that nowadays. :P

 

H-Bomb[/quote']

 

I was into R&R and surf when I went into the service. It was while I was in the Army that I got my introduction to American Blues in two different flavors; the Brits, handing our stuff back to us wrapped up in their own inimitable style, and the Real Deal that was intermingled with the Motown that the Brothers were playing. Taj was fairly new, BB was building his career, John Lee hadn't really broken the color barrier yet...except for those of us crackers lucky enough to have some Bro's for bunkies. A number of Black artists who later gained fame in their homeland were well known primarily among their own race, plus the military folks and overseas at the time.

 

I've long been a Johnny Winter fan, never Clapton for his Blues, especially his singing, but I've heard a few other White artists who are putting their own stamp on the music. Susan Tedeschi has really matured in the past 10 years. So has Jonny Lang...when he sticks to playing Blues. And I'd pay good bucks for some lessons from Bonnie Raitt, she smokes playing AND singing Blues.

 

If they do it right I don't notice their color. If they do it white I sure as hell do. :P

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Okay... I think blues is like "cowboy" music. In theory blues is a 12-bar construct and cowboy music talks about horses and cows. The reality is that neither form is "pure" in that neither was created in a cultural vacuum.

 

For some examples, are Mississipi John Hurt and Rev. Gary Davis "blues" players? How about Bob Wills or Sons of the Pioneers stuff? Davis did "Stars and Stripes Forever," for example and Sons of the Pioneers did jazz chords.

 

The "primitive" seems to me as much a matter of the available technology for appropriate types of performance as anything. Is it only "blues" if it's played on a half-broken Stella? A resonator? Lucille? Is Leadbelly's "Good Night Irene" blues? Was his 12-string?

 

Both genres also - toss in Flamenco if you will, which also has changed over the past 45 years - have been performed by human beings who sometimes wanted to copy somebody else and sometimes wanted to create something of their own and used their own background and abilities to do so.

 

Rock ditto. It grew similarly to how "Bluegrass" and "western swing" evolved out of simpler "folk" styles.

 

I can tell you too that the music on Beale Street in Memphis today ain't necessarily what was played in Blues Alley 28 years ago regardless of the musician's skin color.

 

Well... maybe I'm too much of a history nut as well as one who loves music of many styles, but let's face it, we all respond in terms of our musical tastes, performer or just listener, depending on our environment.

 

What's "blues?" Darned if I know, and I've been listening to a bit of it here and there since hearing John Lee Hooker on a big tube console radio half a century ago.

 

Ditto "cowboy" music. Frankly the old John Wayne movie "The Cowboys" that featured a kid playing Vivaldi on guitar is probably as true to life as you can get. "Grandfather Clock" and "When You and I Were Young" were quite popular, and so were "ragtime" piano styles and player pianos in cowboy saloons. That's for real, not just the movies, by the way. Heck, Chris Ledoux was as much rock as "cowboy" in "Hooked on an eight-second ride."

 

I think musicians will always explore musical concepts they've been exposed to in their own way, some with skill and talent and some with less skill and talent.

 

The degree to which such music may be considered "commercial" probably depends more on the musician's skill, talent and a bit of luck with whom they might meet to "get ahead" in the biz. Heck, Roy Buchanan never got rich and he was about as talented as they come. And... Hmmmmm. Every hear him play "Misty" on Youtube? What's blues?

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Well, I like Blues of all styles I think. Johny Lang is great although it is a morphed style...fine by me. Robert Johnson, John Lee Hooker...both great and both quite different as is BB King who has yet another style.

 

 

Any Blues is better than music played by DJs who think a record player is an instrument! (In my humble opinion...!)

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Roy Buchanan

Danny Gatton

Johnny Winter

Stevie Ray Vaughn

Albert King

B.B. King

 

Come on.... open yourself to some of these people we've mentioned here.

 

Now i am not saying these people are no good, but i think as the way this post is going i think we are looking for more recent artists like 1990 to present.

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Well' date=' I like Blues of all styles I think. Johny Lang is great although it is a morphed style...fine by me. Robert Johnson, John Lee Hooker...both great and both quite different as is BB King who has yet another style.

 

 

Any Blues is better than music played by DJs who think a record player is an instrument! (In my humble opinion...!)[/quote']

 

+1 on the DJ/musician fallacy. How do you like John Lee Hooker, Jr.'s "That be the Blues"? Couldn't be more un-like his Dad's style. Very smooth and jazzy, mellow voice and arrangement.

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